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i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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GmSSL is an open source cryptographic toolbox that supports SM2 / SM3 / SM4 / SM9 and other national secret (national commercial password) algorithm, SM2 digital certificate and SM2 certificate based on SSL / TLS secure communication protocol to support the national security hardware password device , To provide in line with the national standard programming interface and command line tools, can be used to build PKI / CA, secure communication, data encryption and other standards in line with national security applications. For more information, please access GmSSL official website http://gmssl.org/english.html.   Software environments as the belows: Linux kernel: imx_4.14.98_2.0.0_ga cryptodev: 1.9 HW platform: i.MX6UL, i.MX7D/S, i.MX8M/MM, i.MX8QM/QXP. The patches include the following features: 1, Support SM2/SM9   encryption/decryption/sign/verify/ key exchange ,   RSA  encryption/decryption, DSA/ECDSA sign/verify, DH/ECDH key agreement, ECC & DLC & RSA key generation and big number  operation and   e lliptic  c urve   m ath by CAAM hardware   accelerating . 2, run "git apply 0001-Enhance-cryptodev-and-its-engine-in-GmSSL-by-CAAM-s-.patch" under folder sources/poky, and "git apply 0001-Add-public-key-cryptography-operations-in-CAAM-drive.patch"   under folder   sources/meta-fsl-bsp-release for patch these codes. 3, GmSSL Build command: $ tar zxvf GmSSL-master-iMX.tgz $  cd  GmSSL-master-iMX (For i.MX8M/MM, i.MX8QM/QXP) $  source /opt/arm-arch64/environment-setup-aarch64-poky-linux  $  ./Configure -DHAVE_CRYPTODEV -DUSE_CRYPTODEV_DIGESTS -DHW_ENDIAN_SWAP  --prefix= ~/install64   --openssldir=/etc/gmssl --libdir=/usr/lib no-saf no-sdf no-skf no-sof no-zuc -no-ssl3 shared linux-aarch64 $  make  $  make install                              /*image and config file will be installed to folder   ~ /install64   */   (For  i.MX6UL, i.MX7D/S ) $   source /opt/arm-arch32/environment-setup-cortexa7hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi $   ./Configure -DHAVE_CRYPTODEV -DUSE_CRYPTODEV_DIGESTS --prefix= ~ /install32   --openssldir=/etc/gmssl --libdir=/usr/lib no-saf no-sdf no-skf no-sof no-zuc -no-ssl3 shared linux-armv4 $  make  $  make install                             /*image and config file will be installed to folder   ~ /install32   */   4, How to use GmSSL: copy image gmssl to /usr/bin on i.MX board;  copy  gmssl libcrypto.so.1.1 and libssl.so.1.1 to /usr/lib  on i.MX board; copy folder etc/ gmssl to /etc/ on i.MX board. copy test examples (dhtest, dsatest, rsa_test, ecdhtest, ecdsatest, eciestest, sm3test, sms4test, sm2test, sm9test) under GmSSL-master-iMX/test  to U disk for running. You can run test examples by the following commands: #insmod /lib/modules/4.14.98-imx_4.14.98_2.0.0_ga+g5d6cbeafb80c/extra/cryptodev.ko #/run/media/sda1/dhtest #/run/media/sda1/dsatest #/run/media/sda1/rsa_test #/run/media/sda1/ecdhtest #/run/media/sda1/ecdsatest #/run/media/sda1/eciestest #/run/media/sda1/sm3test #/run/media/sda1/sms4test #/run/media/sda1/sm2test #/run/media/sda1/sm9test and speed test commands: #gmssl speed sm2 #gmssl genrsa -rand -f4 512 #gmssl speed dsa #gmssl genrsa -rand -f4 1024 #gmssl speed rsa #gmssl genrsa -rand -f4 2048 #gmssl speed ecdsa #gmssl genrsa -rand -f4 3072 #gmssl speed ecdh #gmssl genrsa -rand -f4 4096   ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++     updating at 2019-09-10    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 0001-fix-the-bug-which-hash-and-cipher-key-don-t-use-DMA-.patch fix the issue which   dismatching on key buffer between crytodev and caam driver. Crytodev uses stack's buffer for key storage and caam driver use it to dma map which cause flush cache failure. The patch need to apply on cryptodev-module in Yocto build.   ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++     updating at 2019-10-14   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ This updating is for China C-V2X application. The package meta-cv2x_4.14.98_2.0.0_ga.tgz is Yocto layer which bases on GmSSL and Cryptodev. I add HW SM2 verification by dedicated CAAM job descriptor and enhanced SW  SM2 verification by precomputed multiples of generator and ARMv8 assembler language to accelerate point  operation.  Software environments as the belows: Linux kernel: imx_4.14.98_2.0.0_ga cryptodev: 1.9 HW platform: i.MX8M/MM/MN, i.MX8QM/QXP. How to build: 1, decompress  meta-cv2x_4.14.98_2.0.0_ga.tgz and copy meta-cv2x to folder (Yocto 4.14.98_2.0.0_ga dir)/sources/ 2, Run DISTRO=fsl-imx-wayland MACHINE=imx8qxpmek source fsl-setup-release.sh -b build-cv2x and add BBLAYERS += " ${BSPDIR}/sources/meta-cv2x " into ( Yocto 4.14.98_2.0.0_ga dir ) /build-cv2x/conf/bblayers.conf and  IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " gmssl-bin "  into local.conf 3, Run bitbake fsl-image-validation-imx. 4, You can find  cv2x-verify.c under (build dir)/tmp/work/aarch64-poky-linux/cryptodev-tests/1.9-r0/git/tests. It is example for using CAAM cryptdev interface to do C-V2X verification (includes SM2 p256, NIST p256 and brainpoolP256r1).   cv2x_benchmark.c   under ( build dir )/tmp/work/aarch64-poky-linux/gmssl/1.0-r0/gmssl-1.0/test is the benchmark test program of C-V2X verifying. It includes HW, SW and HW+SW(one CPU) verifying for  SM2 p256, NIST p256 and brainpoolP256r1. 5, Run the below command on your i.MX8QXP MEK board. modprobe cryptodev ./cv2x_benchmark Note: the udpated GmSSL also support projective coordinates and affine coordinates (CAAM only support affine  coordinates ). Affine  coordinates is used  by default. You can call EC_GROUP_set_coordinates() and EC_GROUP_restore_coordinates() to change coordinates and restore default. When you hope to use some EC APIs under expected coordinates, you need to call EC_GROUP_set_coordinates() before EC APIs and  EC_GROUP_restore_coordinates()  after them. Like the below example: orig_coordinate = EC_GROUP_set_coordinates(EC_PROJECTIVE_COORDINATES); group = EC_GROUP_new_by_curve_name(NID_sm2p256v1); EC_GROUP_restore_coordinates(orig_coordinate);
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How to connect i.MX51 and Ubuntu using USB cable: i.MX51 Side Plug in USB cable. getprop debug.adb.usb - Shows that debug.adb.usb are not set by default setprop persist.service.adb.enable 0 -> disable adb setprop debug.adb.usb 1 - adb will be through USB (for Ethernet, use setprop debug.adb.usb 0) setprop persist.service.adb.enable 1 -> enable adb Example: # getprop debug.adb.usb  # # # setprop persist.service.adb.enable 0 disabling adb # adb_release android_usb gadget: high speed config #1: android setprop debug.adb.usb 1 # # setprop persist.service.adb.enable 1 enabling adb # adb_open adb_release adb_open android_usb gadget: high speed config #1: android # Ubuntu Side On Ubuntu side, the most important tip is regarding permission. ADB server MUST be started with root right. Example of right mistake: $ sudo <AND_SDK_DIR>/android-sdk-linux_86/tools/adb devices List of devices attached ????????????    no permissions  $ sudo <AND_SDK_DIR>/android-sdk-linux_86/tools/adb shell error: insufficient permissions for device How to proceed to get permission: $ sudo <AND_SDK_DIR>/android-sdk-linux_86/tools/adb kill-server $ sudo <AND_SDK_DIR>/android-sdk-linux_86/tools/adb start-server * daemon not running. starting it now * * daemon started successfully * $ sudo <AND_SDK_DIR>/android-sdk-linux_86/tools/adb devices List of devices attached 0123456789ABCDEF    device  $ sudo <AND_SDK_DIR>/android-sdk-linux_86/tools/adb shell ADB over Ethernet/Wi-Fi To make ADB work in i.MX51 using TCP: In your host machine: - Install Android SDK - export ADBHOST=BOARD_IP (setenv ADBHOST=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx) - adb kill-server In your board: - make sure that ro.secure property is *not* set when the adbd daemon is launched, so edit the file default.prop - make sure that /dev/android_adb or /dev/android do *not* exist - stop adbd - start adbd Now you will be able to list the device: hamilton@saygon:/opt/work/androidsdk/android-sdk-linux_86/tools$ ./adb kill-server hamilton@saygon:/opt/work/androidsdk/android-sdk-linux_86/tools$ ./adb devices * daemon not running. starting it now * * daemon started successfully * List of devices attached emulator-5554   device
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  1) Remove all "network" parameter from .../ltib-dir/rootfs/rc.d/rc.conf 2) Add the path of rootfs in the /etc/exports file: /home/user/ltib"dir/rootfs/rootfs *(rw,sync,no_root_squash)   then execute :- #exportfs -ra 3) Execute NFS server /etc/init.d/nfs restart  
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It is often not easy to use company network to flash application, due to network security (proxy, etc...). We will see in this tutorial, how to flash a Linux application in a SD card with ONLY a SD card reader and simple standard Linux commands. SD card Memory Map A Linux application is divided in 3 parts: the bootloader the Linux Kernel the Linux Rootfs We will flash sequentially these 3 parts Flashing U-boot With the SD card Reader, we will flash the yellow part. In the [...]/ltib/rootfs/boot/ folder $ sudo dd if=u-boot.bin of=/dev/sdb bs=512 skip=2 seek=2 && sudo sync Flashing Linux Kernel With the SD card reader, we will flash the green part. Keep in mind that 1MB=1048576B -> Kernel Offset. $ sudo dd if=uImage of=/dev/sdb bs=1048576 seek=1 && sudo sync Configure U-boot variables To launch the Kernel, you need to configure U-boot. Plug the serial cable on the EVK: 115kbps, 8 bits, 1 stop and no parity EVK switches must be configured as below: DS1 DS2 DS3 DS4 DS5 DS5 DS7 DS8 DS9 DS10 Boot from SD/MMC Card 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 Put the SD card in the EVK (bottom slot) and launch the app. In the hyperterminal type:   BBG U-Boot > printenv To print environnement variables Modify the bootcmd: BBG U-Boot > setenv bootcmd_mmc 'run bootargs_base bootargs_mmc;mmc read 0 ${loadaddr} 0x800 0x1800;bootm' "0x1800" is the size of the kernel. Must be bigger than uImage Kernel file (0x1800x512Byte=3MB) If you want to use the WVGA as display screen (kernel need to be configured with CLAA support), for LTIB1007 and after (before it was 'wvga' option): Script for LTIB1007's u-boot on i.MX51 EVK (copy/paste in the hyperterminal): setenv bootcmd_mmc 'run bootargs_base bootargs_mmc; mmc read 0 ${loadaddr} 800 1800 ; bootm' setenv bootargs_mmc 'setenv bootargs ${bootargs} root=/dev/mmcblk0p1 rootwait rw  init=/init' setenv bootargs_base' setenv bootargs console=ttymxc0,115200 di1_primary console=tty1' setenv bootcmd 'run bootcmd_mmc' saveenv Script for LTIB1007's u-boot on i.MX53 EVK (copy/paste in the hyperterminal): setenv bootcmd_mmc 'run bootargs_base bootargs_mmc; mmc read 0 ${loadaddr} 800 1800 ; bootm' setenv bootargs_mmc 'setenv bootargs ${bootargs} root=/dev/mmcblk0p1 rootwait rw  init=/init' setenv bootargs_base 'setenv bootargs console=ttymxc0,115200 di0_primary console=tty1' setenv bootcmd 'run bootcmd_mmc' saveenv You must have the following printenv: BBG U-Boot > printenv bootdelay=3 baudrate=115200 loadaddr=0x90800000 netdev=eth0 ethprime=FEC0 uboot_addr=0xa0000000 uboot=u-boot.bin kernel=uImage bootargs_nfs=setenv bootargs ${bootargs} root=/dev/nfs ip=dhcp nfsroot=${serveri p}:${nfsroot},v3,tcp bootcmd_net=run bootargs_base bootargs_nfs; tftpboot ${loadaddr} ${kernel}; boot m load_uboot=tftpboot ${loadaddr} ${uboot} ethact=FEC0 bootargs=console=ttymxc0,115200 di1_primary root=/dev/mmcblk0p1 rootwait rw init =/init bootcmd_mmc=run bootargs_base bootargs_mmc; mmc read 0 ${loadaddr} 800 1800 ; bo otm bootargs_mmc=setenv bootargs ${bootargs} root=/dev/mmcblk0p1 rootwait rw init=/i nit bootargs_base=setenv bootargs console=ttymxc0,115200 di1_primary bootcmd=run bootcmd_mmc stdin=serial stdout=serial stderr=serial</br> Environment size: 748/131068 bytes BBG U-Boot > Create ext3 partition With the SD card reader, create an ext3 partition. You can use gparted, a graphical partition manager tool. Launch gparted: $ sudo gparted Create a new ext3 partition, with 20MB of offset: Copying Linux To copy rootfs folder generated by LTIB, type in the shell: $ sudo cp -r /[…]/ltib/rootfs/* /media/FreescaleSD/ && sudo sync Test application Put the SD in the slot slot and launch the application. Password is root.
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Ubuntu distro uses dash instead of bash as shell, then change it to bash: # cd /bin # sudo rm sh # sudo ln -s bash sh Install all necessary packages by typing: sudo apt-get install patch g++ rpm zlib1g-dev m4 bison libncurses5-dev libglib2.0-dev gettext \ build-essential tcl intltool libxml2-dev liborbit2-dev libx11-dev ccache flex uuid-dev liblzo2-dev If under Ubuntu 64bit, install ia32-libs package: sudo apt-get install ia32-libs If you will install Xorg in your ltib, you will need to install this package: sudo apt-get install x11proto-core-dev If you will install gtk+ in your ltib, you will need to install the following packages: sudo apt-get install libdbus-glib-1-dev libgtk2.0-dev libdbus-glib-1-dev Configure visudo file, as root using the command "/usr/sbin/visudo", and add the following line in the User privilege section: username ALL = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/rpm, /opt/freescale/ltib/usr/bin/rpm Where username is your user name, the name you use to do logon in your system. Classic Error messages and solutions under Ubuntu Can't exec "mconf": No such file or directory at /home/tic/ltib/bin/Ltibutils.pm line 972. exec: mconf /home/tic/ltib/config/main.lkc: No such file or directory at /home/tic/ltib/bin/Ltibutils.pm line 972. traceback:   Ltibutils::system_nb:972   main::get_plat_dir:2947     main:548 Started: Tue Feb 16 18:01:38 2010 Ended:  Tue Feb 16 18:59:26 2010 Elapsed: 3468 seconds Build Failed Solution: edit the ltib script line 925:                   # install the new package           $cmd  = "$cf->{sudo} $cf->{rpm} ";           $cmd .= "--root $cf->{rpmroot} ";           $cmd .= "--dbpath $cf->{rpmdb} ";           $cmd .= "--prefix $cf->{rpmipfx} " if $cf->{rpmipfx};           $cmd .= "--ignorearch -ivh ";           $cmd .= "--force "  unless $cf->{conflicts} || $cf->{hostinst};           $cmd .= "--replacepkgs --replacefiles " if $cf->{hostinst};           $cmd .= "--nodeps " if $cf->{nodeps};           $cmd .= "--excludedocs "; +        $cmd .= "--force-debian " if $rpm =~ m/rpm-fs/ && `uname -a` =~ m/ubuntu/i;           $cmd .= "--define '_tmppath $cf->{tmppath}' ";           $cmd .= "$rpm"; error: cannot open Name index using db3 - No such file or directory (2) error: cannot open Name index using db3 - No such file or directory (2) sudo rpm --root / --dbpath /tmp/rpm-tic/rpmdb -e --allmatches --nodeps --define '_tmppath /home/tic/ltib/tmp' rpm-fs 2>/dev/null sudo rpm --root / --dbpath /tmp/rpm-tic/rpmdb --ignorearch -ivh --force --nodeps --excludedocs --define '_tmppath /home/tic/ltib/tmp'  /tmp/rpm-tic/RPMS/i686/rpm-fs-4.0.4-1.i686.rpm rpm: please use alien to install rpm packages on Debian, if you are really sure use --force-debian switch. See README.Debian for more details. sudo /opt/freescale/ltib/usr/bin/rpm --root / --dbpath /opt/freescale/ltib/var/lib/rpm -Uv --justdb --notriggers --noscripts --nodeps  /tmp/rpm-tic/RPMS/i686/rpm-fs-4.0.4-1.i686.rpm sudo: /opt/freescale/ltib/usr/bin/rpm: command not found mkdir: cannot create directory `/opt/freescale': Permission denied Cannot create the download directory:   /opt/freescale/pkgs Either change to a global directory you have write permissions to, or create it as root.  Please set the permissions to 777 traceback:   main::check_dirs:2469   main::host_checks:1426     main:542 Started: Wed Nov 25 01:56:53 2009 Ended:  Wed Nov 25 02:07:42 2009 Elapsed: 649 seconds Build Failed solution : sudo chmod 777 /opt make[1]: Entering directory `/opt/freescale/ltib/usr/src/rpm/BUILD/texinfo-4.8' Making all in tools make[2]: Entering directory `/opt/freescale/ltib/usr/src/rpm/BUILD/texinfo-4.8/tools' make[2]: *** No rule to make target `all'.  Stop. make[2]: Leaving directory `/opt/freescale/ltib/usr/src/rpm/BUILD/texinfo-4.8/tools' make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1 make[1]: Leaving directory `/opt/freescale/ltib/usr/src/rpm/BUILD/texinfo-4.8' make: *** [all] Error 2 error: Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.U8vEdX (%build) RPM build errors:     Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.U8vEdX (%build) Build time for texinfo: 55 seconds Failed building texinfo Died at ./ltib line 1380. traceback:   main::build_host_rpms:1380   main::host_checks:1435     main:542 Started: Wed Nov 25 20:10:43 2009 Ended:  Wed Nov 25 20:31:42 2009 Elapsed: 1259 seconds These packages failed to build: texinfo Build Failed solution : install ccache package in host + cd /opt/freescale/ltib/usr/src/rpm/BUILD + cd lkc-1.4 + make -j1 conf mconf gcc -O0 -Wall -g -fPIC -c conf.c -o conf.o bison -l -b zconf -p zconf zconf.y flex -L -Pzconf zconf.l make: flex: Command not found make: *** [lex.zconf.c] Error 127 error: Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.010CjL (%build) RPM build errors:     Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.010CjL (%build) Build time for lkc: 2 seconds Failed building lkc Died at ./ltib line 1380. traceback:   main::build_host_rpms:1380   main::host_checks:1435     main:542 Started: Thu Nov 26 00:33:46 2009 Ended:  Thu Nov 26 01:19:39 2009 Elapsed: 2753 seconds These packages failed to build: lkc Build Failed solution : install flex package in host Making all in po make[2]: Entering directory `/home/tic/ltib/rpm/BUILD/alsa-utils-1.0.11rc2/alsaconf/po' mv: cannot stat `t-ja.gmo': No such file or directory make[2]: *** [ja.gmo] Error 1 make[2]: *** Waiting for unfinished jobs.... mv: cannot stat `t-ru.gmo': No such file or directory make[2]: *** [ru.gmo] Error 1 make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/tic/ltib/rpm/BUILD/alsa-utils-1.0.11rc2/alsaconf/po' make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1 make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/tic/ltib/rpm/BUILD/alsa-utils-1.0.11rc2/alsaconf' make: *** [all-recursive] Error 1 error: Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.93730 (%build) RPM build errors:     Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.93730 (%build) Build time for alsa-utils: 84 seconds Failed building alsa-utils f_buildrpms() returned an error, exiting traceback:   main:560 Started: Sat Nov 28 07:39:40 2009 Ended:  Sat Nov 28 08:17:18 2009 Elapsed: 2258 seconds These packages failed to build: alsa-utils Build Failed Exiting on error or interrupt solution : install package gettext and ja-trans checking for glib-genmarshal... no configure: error: Could not find a glib-genmarshal in your PATH error: Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.13030 (%build) RPM build errors:     Bad exit status from /home/tic/ltib/tmp/rpm-tmp.13030 (%build) Build time for glib2: 107 seconds Failed building glib2 f_buildrpms() returned an error, exiting traceback:   main:560 Started: Sat Dec  5 03:19:36 2009 Ended:  Sat Dec  5 03:29:46 2009 Elapsed: 610 seconds These packages failed to build: glib2 Build Failed Exiting on error or interrupt solution : install the package libglib2.0-dev
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When to enable CONFIG_DEBUG_LL, choose the debug port and then CONFIG_EARLY_PRINTK on i.MX6, system will hang. There is no error information there as below, Uncompressing Linux... done, booting the kernel. Booting Linux on physical CPU 0x0 Initializing cgroup subsys cpu Initializing cgroup subsys cpuacct Linux version 4.1.15-00001-gd582989-dirty (jay@jay-ubuntu) (gcc version 4.9 20 150123 (prerelease) (GCC) ) #10 SMP PREEMPT Mon Jul 17 15:08:55 CST 2017 CPU: ARMv7 Processor [412fc09a] revision 10 (ARMv7), cr=10c53c7d CPU: PIPT / VIPT nonaliasing data cache, VIPT aliasing instruction cache Machine model: Freescale i.MX6 Quad SABRE Smart Device Board bootconsole [earlycon0] enabled cma: Reserved 448 MiB at 0x2a000000 Memory policy: Data cache writealloc -------------- hang ----------------- ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ The patch fix it on android n7.1.1_1.0.0, kernel: 4.1.15.
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Booting Linux Directly from SD/MMC Card     You can create a self-bootable SD or MMC card with Linux.     This tutorial describes how to create a complete Linux system (bootloader + Linux kernel + root file system) that boots from SD/MMC card.     This is very useful for people willing to demonstrate several Linux images that can be self-contained in SD/MMC cards. Flashing RedBoot on MMC using ATK     To boot Linux from a SD card, the first thing to do is to program the bootloader to the card. For this, click on the link below:     I.MX35 PDK Board Flashing SDCard Flashing RedBoot on MMC using DD     You can also use dd on any linux system to load redboot:   $ sudo dd if=./Desktop/mx35_3stack_redboot_mmc.bin of=/dev/sdd bs=512 skip=2 seek=2 Configuring Kernel to Boot From SD/MMC     Creating a Linux bootable MMC/SD Card.     Execute LTIB:   $ ./ltib -c     Choose configure the kernel:   [*] Configure the kernel     Change image generation to NFS:     Target Image Generation     Options --->     (X) NFS only     Compile Linux kernel with built-in support to MMC/SD and ext3:     Follow that sequence:     Device Drivers --->     <*> MMC/SD card support --->     <*> UniFi SDIO glue for Freescale MMC/SDIO     <*> Freescale i.MX Secure Digital Host Controller Interface support       File systems --->     <*> Ext3 journalling file system support     After the compilation copy the file ~/ltib/rootfs/boot/zImage to tftpboot directory:   $ cp ~/ltib/rootfs/boot/zImage /tftpboot Creating RedBoot Kernel Partition     Create RedBoot partitions and copy Linux kernel to it:     Turn MMC active:   RedBoot> factive MMC     Initialize flash partitions:   RedBoot> fis init       RedBoot> fis list     ... Read from 0x07ee0000-0x07eff000 at 0x00060000: .     Name FLASH addr Mem addr Length Entry point     RedBoot 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00040000 0x00000000     FIS directory 0x00060000 0x00060000 0x0001F000 0x00000000     RedBoot config 0x0007F000 0x0007F000 0x00001000 0x00000000     Load kernel to RAM:   RedBoot> load -r -b 0x100000 /tftpboot/zImage     Using default protocol (TFTP)     Raw file loaded 0x00100000-0x002c31b7, assumed entry at 0x00100000     Create a kernel partition with content of kernel image loaded to RAM:       RedBoot> fis create -f 0x200000 kernel         RedBoot> fis list     ... Read from 0x07ee0000-0x07eff000 at 0x00060000: .     Name FLASH addr Mem addr Length Entry point     RedBoot 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00040000 0x00000000     FIS directory 0x00060000 0x00060000 0x0001F000 0x00000000     RedBoot config 0x0007F000 0x0007F000 0x00001000 0x00000000     kernel 0x00200000 0x00100000 0x001E0000 0x00100000     If you reset your board you need to see:   Booting from [SD card, CSD Version 1.0]     If instead you see this message:   Booting from [unknown version card ]     This means your card is not support, please replace it with other card. Creating the Root File System     After storing the kernel image in the SD card, remove the card from the target board and insert it in your computer (running Linux).     In this example, Linux detected the SD card as /dev/sdb.     Now we need to create two partitions. The first partition will not be used, this is just reserved to RedBoot and kernel. The second partition will be used to store Linux Root File System.   # fdisk /dev/sdb     Device contains neither a valid DOS partition table, nor Sun, SGI or OSF disklabel     Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0x526c22da.     Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.     After that, of course, the previous content won't be recoverable.         Warning: invalid flag 0x0000 of partition table 4 will be corrected by w(rite)         Command (m for help): p         Disk /dev/sdb: 1023 MB, 1023934464 bytes     32 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1008 cylinders     Units = cylinders of 1984 * 512 = 1015808 bytes     Disk identifier: 0x526c22da           Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System     Create the first partition with 8 MB; it already contains RedBoot and the kernel, as we stored previously:             Command (m for help): n     Command action       e extended       p primary partition (1-4)     p     Partition number (1-4): 1     First cylinder (1-1008, default 1):     Using default value 1     Last cylinder, +cylinders or +size{K,M,G} (1-1008, default 1008): +8M     Now, create the second partition using all remaining space on SD card:       Command (m for help): n     Command action       e extended       p primary partition (1-4)     p     Partition number (1-4): 2     First cylinder (10-1008, default 10):     Using default value 10     Last cylinder, +cylinders or +size{K,M,G} (10-1008, default 1008):     Using default value 1008         Command (m for help): p         Disk /dev/sdb: 1023 MB, 1023934464 bytes     32 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1008 cylinders     Units = cylinders of 1984 * 512 = 1015808 bytes     Disk identifier: 0x526c22da     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System     /dev/sdb1 1 9 8897 83 Linux     /dev/sdb2 10 1008 991008 83 Linux         Command (m for help): w   Now format the second partition as EXT3: # mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb2   Remove the SD card from your computer and insert again. Probably your Linux distribution will dectect it and will mount automatically.   On Ubuntu 8.10 it was mounted on /dev/media:   # mount   ...   /dev/sdb2 on /media/disk type ext3 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=hal) If your Linux didn't mount it, then you can mount it manually:   # mkdir -p /media/disk   # mount /dev/sdb2 -t ext3 /media/disk   Enter in your LTIB directory and copy the rootfs content to SD card:   # cd /home/alan/ltib-imx35/rootfs/   # cp -a * /media/disk/   Verify if it was copied correctly:   # ls -l /media/disk/   total 80   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 bin   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 boot   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 dev   drwxr-xr-x 6 root root 4096 2009-03-12 14:41 etc   drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 home   drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 lib   lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 11 2009-03-12 14:47 linuxrc -> bin/busybox   drwx------ 2 root root 16384 2009-03-12 14:37 lost+found   drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 mnt   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 opt   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 proc   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 10:10 root   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 sbin   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 sys   drwxrwxrwt 3 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:53 tmp   drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 unit_tests   drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 usr   drwxr-xr-x 11 root root 4096 2009-03-12 09:55 var   root@urubu:~/ltib-imx25/rootfs#     Now umount the SD card:   # umount /media/disk Configuring RedBoot to Load Kernel and Rootfs from SD/MMC Card     Remove the SD card from your computer and place again in the board.     Configure RedBoot to load the kernel from SD/MMC card and set up the kernel command parameter "root" to load the root file system from second SD/MMC card partition (/dev/mmcblk0p2)     RedBoot> fc     Run script at boot: true     Boot script:     Enter script, terminate with empty line     >> fis load kernel     >> exec -b 0x100000 -l 0x200000 -c "noinitrd console=ttymxc0,115200 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 init=/linuxrc ip=none"     >>     Boot script timeout (1000ms resolution): 1     Use BOOTP for network configuration: false     Gateway IP address: 10.29.244.254     Local IP address: 10.29.244.135     Local IP address mask: 255.255.0.0     Default server IP address: 10.29.240.182     Board specifics: 0     Console baud rate: 115200     Set eth0 network hardware address [MAC]: false     Set FEC network hardware address [MAC]: false     GDB connection port: 9000     Force console for special debug messages: false     Network debug at boot time: false     Default network device: lan92xx_eth0     Update RedBoot non-volatile configuration - continue (y/n)? y     ... Read from 0x07ee0000-0x07eff000 at 0x00060000: .     ... Erase from 0x00060000-0x00080000: .     ... Program from 0x07ee0000-0x07f00000 at 0x00060000: .       Now just reset the board and it will boot directly from SD/MMC card.
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Getting Started for i.MX53 Quick Start Board Here is a quick overview you can follow to get your very first contact with i.MX53 QSB. Introduction Out of box i.MX53 QSB video booting up Ubuntu Original Video: Out of box i.MX53 QSB video booting up Ubuntu with some demo (GPU and VPU) Original Video: How to load a pre-built image Here, you should have loaded your board with the out-of-box SD card. Next step is create your own SD card with some pre-built image. You can find pre-built image packages from Freescale for Linux look for Linux Binary Demo file Please, go to Timesys wikipage[1] and see how to load a pre-built image. You can use some Freescale image or some Timesys image. Both will work! For loading linux OS you need at least 3 images: bootloader image kernel image root file system image or tarball Bootloader For iMX53QSB the default bootloader provided by Freescale is u-boot.You can build your own image using LTIB following the same procedure from here. Kernel You can build a new uImage (kernel binary image to be loaded by u-boot) using LTIB, and you can follow the instructions from here Root File System Root file system is a set of directories and files that become the system environment. How to Built Your Own Image Take BSP package on Freescale i.MX53 QSB web site. Prepare your computer to LTIB installation, see that you need All Boards LTIB. Transfer all images to the SD Card (it will be placed under <ltib_dir>/rootfs/boot). Configure your u-boot environment variable. Boot your board. In case you want to boot via NFS, please follow the next procedure instead. Take BSP package on Freescale i.MX 53 QSB web site. Prepare your computer to LTIB installation, see that you need @all_boards_ltib Configure your computer to be able to provide NFS service: Configure your TFTP server. Configure your NFS server. Configure your u-boot environment variable. Boot your board. Be aware the kernel command line you set on u-boot variable can configure the display.
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This document explains how to bring-up u-boot & Linux via JTAG This procedure has been tested on: i.MX6 Solo X Sabre SD i.MX6UL EVK Prerequistes: Get the latest BSP for your board. This procedure was tested with L4.1.15. Build the 'core-image-minimal' image to bring-up your board (Detailed steps here) Optional- Build a meta-toolchain for your device 1.- Set board to boot from Serial dowloader mode or set it to boot from the SD card and remove the sd card We basically want the board to stall in boot ROM to attach to the target. 2.- Connect JTAG probe and turn on the board The device should stall trying to establish a connection to download an image, this will allow us to attach to the target. 3.- Load Device Configuration Data In 'normal' boot sequence the boot ROM takes care of reading the DCD and configuring the device accordingly, but in this case we are skipping this sequence and we need to configure the device manually. The script used by Lauterbach to parse and configure the device is called dcd_interpreter.cmm and can be found here. Search for the package for your specific device. The DCD configuration for your board should be on your u-boot directory: yocto_build_dir/tmp/work/<your board>imx6ulevk/u-boot-imx/<u-boot_version>2016.03-r0/git under board/freescale/<name of your board>mx6ul_14x14_evk/imximage.cfg This file (imximage.cfg) contains all the data to bring up DRAM among other early configuration options. 4.- Load U-boot If an SREC file of U-boot is not present build it (meta-toolchain installed required) the SREC file contains all the information required by the probe to load it and makes this process easier. To build the SREC simply type: make <your board defconfig>mx6ul_14x14_evk_defconfig  (all supported boards are found under u-boot_dir/configs) make If you cannot build an SREC or do not want to, you can use the u-boot.imx (located under yocto_build_dir/tmp/deploy/images/<your board name>/) or u-boot.bin files but you will need to figure out the start address and load address for these files, this can be done by examining the IVT on u-boot.imx (here is a useful document explaining the structure of the IVT). Let U-boot run and you should see its output on the console I will try to boot from several sources but it will fail and show you the prompt. 5.- Create RAMDisk After building the core-image-minimal you will have all the required files under yocto_build_dir/tmp/deploy/images/<your board name>/ You will need: zImage.bin - zImage--<Linux Version>--<your board>.bin Device tree blob - zImage--<Linux Version>--<your board>.dtb Root file system - core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4 We need to create a RAMDisk out of the root file system we now have, these are the steps to do so: Compress current Root file system using gzip: gzip core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4 If you want to keep the original file use: gzip -c core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4 > core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4.gz Create RAMDisk using mkimage: mkimage -A arm -O linux -T ramdisk -C gzip -n core-image-minimal -d core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4.gz core-image-minimal-RAMDISK.rootfs.ext4.gz.u-boot Output: Image Name: core-image-minimal Created: Tue May 23 11:28:55 2017 Image Type: ARM Linux RAMDisk Image (gzip compressed) Data Size: 3017939 Bytes = 2947.21 kB = 2.88 MB Load Address: 00000000 Entry Point: 00000000 Here are some details on mkimage usage Usage: mkimage -l image -l ==> list image header information mkimage [-x] -A arch -O os -T type -C comp -a addr -e ep -n name -d data_file[:data_file...] image -A ==> set architecture to 'arch' -O ==> set operating system to 'os' -T ==> set image type to 'type' -C ==> set compression type 'comp' -a ==> set load address to 'addr' (hex) -e ==> set entry point to 'ep' (hex) -n ==> set image name to 'name' -d ==> use image data from 'datafile' -x ==> set XIP (execute in place) mkimage [-D dtc_options] [-f fit-image.its|-F] fit-image -D => set options for device tree compiler -f => input filename for FIT source Signing / verified boot not supported (CONFIG_FIT_SIGNATURE undefined) mkimage -V ==> print version information and exit 6.- Modify U-boot's environment variables Now we need to modify U-boot's bootargs as follows: setenv bootargs console=${console},${baudrate} root=/dev/ram rw We need to find out the addresses where u-boot will expect the zImage, the device tree and the initial RAMDisk, we can do it as follows: => printenv fdt_addr fdt_addr=0x83000000 => printenv initrd_addr initrd_addr=0x83800000 => printenv loadaddr loadaddr=0x80800000 Where: fdt_addr -> Device tree blob load address initrd_addr -> RAMDisk load address loadaddr -> zImage load address 7.- Load zImage, DTB and RAMDisk Now we know where to load our zImage, device tree blob and RAMDisk, on Lauterbach this can be achieved by running the following commands: Stop the target and execute: data.load.binary zImage.bin 0x80800000 data.load.binary Your_device.dtb 0x83000000 data.load.binary  core-image-minimal-RAMDISK.rootfs.ext4.gz.u-boot 0x83800000 Let the device run again and deattach from the device in lauterbach this is achieved by: go SYStem.mode.NoDebug start the boot process on u-boot as follows: bootz ${loadaddr} ${initrd_addr} ${fdt_addr} You should now see the Linux kernel boot process on your terminal: After the kernel boots you should see its prompt on your terminal: Since we are running out of RAM there is no way for us to save u-boot's environment variables, but you can modify the source and compile u-boot with the new bootargs, by doing so you can create a Load script that loads all the binaries hits go and the boot process will continue automatically. One way to achieve this is to modify the configuration file under U-boot_dir/include/configs/<your board>.h find the mfgtool_args and modify accordingly. The images attached to this thread have been modified as mentioned.
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Introduction This is a brief guide showing how to integrate the driver for the WF111 module to the i.MX6 BSP Release. In this case the WF111 driver is available on a repository and it’s in accordance with the Yocto Project, which allows to easily customize a linux distribution for your board. Requirements WF111 Documentation – Silicon Labs have made a great job of documenting the steps to add the WF111 driver to a Linux distribution and have created Application Note 996 (link below), which we will use as reference. http://www.silabs.com/documents/login/application-notes/AN996.pdf WF111 Driver - We will also be using the Yocto layer included on the following repository: https://github.com/engicam-stable/meta-engicam i.MX6 3.14.52 BSP Release – In out scenario the WF111 layer that will be imported includes a driver that it’s compatible with Linux Kernel 2.6.24 up to 4.1., which it’s important to keep in mind.   Installing the 3.14.52 BSP Release First, setup the 3.14.52 BSP as described on the i.MX Yocto Project User’s Guide.   Adding the WF111 Driver Layer Clone the WF111 Driver Layer to your sources folder inside the BSP Release directory. Since the 3.14.52 BSP Release is based on Fido we will clone the Fido branch of the driver repository. $ cd <BSP_RELEASE_DIR>/sources $ git clone https://github.com/engicam-stable/meta-engicam -b fido ‍ ‍  Once the layer is cloned you would need to add the new later editing the bblayers.conf file located the following path: <BSP_RELEASE_DIR>/<BUILD_DIR>/conf/bblayers.conf By adding the following line to add the new layer.   BBLAYERS += " ${BSPDIR}/sources/meta-engicam " ‍   This should make the wf111-driver available through bitbake since bitbake will now look into this layer for all available recipes. You can then add the driver to your image by adding the following line to the <BUILD_DIR>/conf/local.conf   IMAGE_INSTALL_append += "wf111-driver" ‍ Or you may create a new image recipe that includes the wf111-driver package. However, there are certain kernel options that must be enabled for the driver to work.   Creating an append to configure the kernel options Before we can bake an image with the WF111 driver we would need to edit the kernel options as mentioned on Silabs AN996. The following kernel options must be enabled:   CONFIG_WIRELESS_EXT CONFIG_MODULES CONFIG_FW_LOADER We would need to add the CONFIG_WIRELESS_EXT as the other two options are enabled on the BSP by default.   This involves adding an addendum to the kernel recipe to change its configuration. You may either add this append to any layer. The best way to handle it would be using a new layer for all your customization. You can find how to create a new layer on the following document: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-331917 We’ll use a new layer called meta-newlayer for this example. It’s important that this layer has a high priority so the changes from the bbappend are not overridden. The following alternative was suggested by Chris Hossack on the following thread: https://community.nxp.com/thread/376369 First, run the menuconfig tool on the bitbake environment: bitbake linux-imx -c menuconfig Enable the necessary options: Networking Support > Wireless > cfg80211 wireless extensions compatibility   Save the configuration and exit. Then run the following bitbake command, which will create a config fragment file that contains the changed made to the default kernel options. bitbake linux-imx -c diffconfig We’ll make an append file that adds the required options.  Content of the config fragment:   CONFIG_WIRELESS_EXT=y CONFIG_WEXT_CORE=y CONFIG_WEXT_PROC=y CONFIG_WEXT_SPY=y CONFIG_WEXT_PRIV=y CONFIG_CFG80211_WEXT=y CONFIG_LIB80211=y CONFIG_LIB80211_CRYPT_WEP=y CONFIG_LIB80211_CRYPT_CCMP=y CONFIG_LIB80211_CRYPT_TKIP=y # CONFIG_LIB80211_DEBUG is not set CONFIG_HOSTAP=y # CONFIG_HOSTAP_FIRMWARE is not set ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍    Since we are appending the kernel layer we need to add the addendum on the same path as that of the original kernel recipe but within our layer and create the append file there. Also add the WF111.cfg file to the linux-imx directory:   We would need to copy (and you may rename it as well) to the folder where are will be creating the append recipe for the kernel. Copy:  <BSP_RELEASE>/<BUILD_DIR>/tmp/work/<MACHINE>-poky-Linux-gnueabi/linux-imx/<KERNEL_VERSION>/fragment.cfg To: <BSP_RELEASE>/sources/meta-newlayer/recipes-kernel/linux/linux-imx/WF111.cfg You can do so suing the following command: cp <BSP_RELEASE>/<BUILD_DIR>/tmp/work/<MACHINE>-poky-Linux-gnueabi/linux-imx/<KERNEL_VERSION>/fragment.cfg <BSP_RELEASE>/sources/meta-newlayer/recipes-kernel/linux/linux-imx/WF111.cfg ‍ (Please note that the file was renamed for ease, but you may use any name for the config fragment)   We need to create the bbappend file on the following path (as it must be the same relative path as the original recipe it is appending) <BSP_RELEASE>/sources/meta-newlayer/recipes-kernel/linux/linux-imx_3.14.52.bbappend   The linux-imx_3.14.52.bbappend file would contain the following:   SRC_URI += "file://WF111.cfg"  do_configure_append() {          #this is run from         #./tmp/work/<MACHINE>-poky-linux-gnueabi/linux-imx/3.14.52-r0/git          cat ../*.cfg >> ${B}/.config  } ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍    After creating this recipe you should be able to bake any image from the BSP and see the driver there. I tested with the core-minimal-image and found that the files were indeed added to /lib/firmware. $ bitbake core-image-minimal ‍‍ ‍
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The i.MX 8QXP MEK does not allow the OV5640/LVDS/LCD usage only by changing the device tree anymore. It occurs because the M4 owns the i2c resources, so the A core must use rpmsg to enable virtual drivers. Due to this, if the user changes the device tree, for instance, the *ov5640.dtb, the kernel won't boot, entering in the following loop: [    8.603353] [drm] Supports vblank timestamp caching Rev 2 (21.10.2013).      [    8.610025] [drm] No driver support for vblank timestamp query.              [    8.616077] imx-drm display-subsystem: bound imx-drm-dpu-bliteng.2 (ops dpu_) [    8.624978] imx-drm display-subsystem: bound imx-dpu-crtc.0 (ops dpu_crtc_op) [    8.632526] imx-drm display-subsystem: bound imx-dpu-crtc.1 (ops dpu_crtc_op) [    8.639833] imx-drm display-subsystem: failed to bind ldb@562210e0 (ops imx_7 [    8.648428] imx-drm display-subsystem: master bind failed: -517 With the approach provided in this post, it is possible to make this change manually, only by changing the flash.bin at U-boot for a non-m4 one. In order to make the changes to the flash.bin file, it’s needed to obtain the following files: - u-boot.bin from internal u-boot provided by NXP. - scfw_tcm.bin from SCFW porting kit - bl31.bin from ARM Trusted Firmware - SECO firmware container image Disclaimer The described procedures in this document target a GNU/Linux (Ubuntu 20.04 LTS) and it’s focused on iMX8QXP B0 + BSP L4.19.35_1.1.0. Required packages 1 - Install ARM64 ToolChain: 1.1 - Install ARM64 GCC and G++ cross-compilers: # apt install gcc-aarch64-linux-gnu g++-aarch64-linux-gnu 2 - Install ARM32 GCC6 ToolChain: 2.1 - Download the ARM32 6 Toolchain and install it: $ mkdir ~/gcc_toolchain $ cp ~/Downloads/gcc-arm-none-eabi-6-2017-q2-update-linux.tar.bz2 ~/gcc_toolchain/ $ cd ~/gcc_toolchain/ $ tar xvjf gcc-arm-none-eabi-6-2017-q2-update-linux.tar.bz2 # apt-get update # apt-get install srecord 3 - Download MKimage 3.1 - Create a new directory desired to the packages: $ mkdir flash_build $ cp flash_build 3.1 - Clone the MKimage: $ git clone https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-mkimage -b imx_4.19.35_1.1.0 4 - U-boot build 4.1 - Clone the U-boot  $ git clone https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/uboot-imx -b imx_v2019.04_4.19.35_1.1.0 $ cd uboot-imx 4.2 - Export the ARM64 ToolChain:  $ export ARCH=arm64 $ export CROSS_COMPILE=/usr/bin/aarch64-linux-gnu- 4.3 - Build it:  $ unset LDFLAGS $ make -j4 imx8qxp_mek_defconfig $ make 4.4 - Copy the binary files to the MKimage/iMX8QX directory:  $ cp spl/u-boot-spl.bin ../imx-mkimage/iMX8QX/ $ cp u-boot-nodtb.bin ../imx-mkimage/iMX8QX/ $ cd ..   5 - ARM Trusted Firmware 5.1 - Clone the imx-atf:  $ git clone https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-atf -b imx_4.19.35_1.1.0 $ cd imx-atf 5.2 - Build it:  $ unset LDFLAGS $ make PLAT=imx8qx bl31 5.3 - Copy the binary files to the MKimage/iMX8QX directory:  $ cp build/imx8qx/release/bl31.bin ../imx-mkimage/iMX8QX/ $ cd ..   6 - SCFW 6.1 - Export the ARM32 GCC6 Toolchain:  $ export TOOLS=~/gcc_toolchain/ 6.2 - Download the BSP L4.19.35_1.1.0_SCFW and copy it to the flash_build directory:  $ cp ~/Downloads/imx-scfw-porting-kit-1.2.7.1.tar.gz $ tar xvzf imx-scfw-porting-kit-1.2.7.1.tar.gz $ cd packages/ $ chmod a+x imx-scfw-porting-kit-1.2.7.1.tar.gz $ ./imx-scfw-porting-kit-1.2.7.1.bin 6.3 - Build it to i.MX 8QXP MEK B0:  $ cd imx-scfw-porting-kit-1.2.7.1/src/ $ tar xvzf scfw_export_mx8qx_b0.tar.gz $ cd scfw_export_mx8qx_b0/ $ make qx R=B0 B=mek 6.4 -  Copy the binary file to the MKimage/iMX8QX directory:  $ cp build_mx8qx_b0/scfw_tcm.bin ../../../../imx-mkimage/iMX8QX/ $ cp ../../../../ 7 - SECO Firmware Container Image 7.1 - Download the SECO firmware binaries and copy it to the flash_build directory $ cp ~/Downloads/firmware-imx-7.9.bin . $ chmod a+x firmware-imx-7.9.bin 7.2 - Copy the binary files to the MKimage/iMX8QX directory:  $ cp firmware-imx-7.9/firmware/seco/mx8qx-ahab-container.img /imx-mkimage/iMX8QX/ 8 - Build flash.bin 8.1 -  In a new terminal, open the imx-mkimage directory : $ cd flash_build/imx-mkimage 8.2 - Build it:  $ make SOC=iMX8QX flash 8.3 - Deploy it to the SDCard:  $ sudo dd if=iMX8QX/flash.bin of=/dev/sdX bs=1k seek=32 && sync Now, you are able to use any non-rpmsg.dtb without kernel errors. Author: Pedro Jardim: pedro.jardim@nxp.com
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Q: How to program i.MX6 eFUSE? A: what about using the mfg tool? In the end only the supplies, USB OTG and the boot mode pins need to be connected. The customers Idea was to have all devices (i.MX6 eFUSE , Flash, PFUZE, etc) pre- programmed before mounting on the board. I presented the flows we support (MFG Tool, Platform SDK) for eFUSE programming last Friday when I was at the customer. KITPF0100SKTEVBE Product Summary Page MfgTools is the most convenient way to burn eFuse . Or the customer can burn the fuse on their jig/socket board by the u-boot: How to Fuse in U-Boot U-Boot contains a tool, imxotp , which is used for fusing. U-Boot > imxotp imxotp - One-Time Programable sub-system Usage: imxotp imxotp read <index> - read fuse at 'index' imxotp blow [--force] <index> <value> - blow fuse at 'index' with hex value 'value' Tips: ' addr ' to 'index': convert 'index' from 'address' index = ( addr - otp_base) / 0x10 eg , addr is 0x021bc410, otp_base is 0x021bc400, the index = 1 '-- force ' must be present in order to blow the fuse. Command will abort if '--force' is missing. index = ( addr - otp_base) / 0x10, where the addr is the address of the fuse you want to operate, the otp_base is the base address of the fuse block. ' value ' should correspond to fuse settings according to the fuse map and desired fuse configuration. ---------------------------------- FIrst of all thanks for your reply. However both flow assumes the i.MX6 is already soldered on the board. Please note the specific request was if it is possible (and we can support a programming house) to pre program the efuses BEFORE they are soldered on the PCB thus on a standard programmer. Take an FLASH programmer as an example.
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Splash Screen on U-boot for i.MX25 PDK Having a bitmap on the LCD a few seconds after boot is a requirement on several embedded systems, u-Boot supports this feature. However, currently, the code provided on Freescale's BSP only implements support for the LCD controller on Linux. This page provides instructions to add support for the LCDC on the u-boot. 1 - Install Freescale i.MX25 BSP, SDK 1.7 It is available on www.freescale.com. If needed follow the getting started section instructions. 2 - Update u-boot source After installing the BSP and running LTIB for the first time, it's time to update u-boot: - Download u-Boot patch and spec file. - Replace the file "u-boot.spec.in" located at <ltib_path>/config/platform/imx by the one downloaded - Copy the "u-boot-2009.08-1273860148.patch" downloaded to /opt/freescale/pkgs 3 - Extract and rebuild u-boot - To extract the source and aply the patch run: <Ltib_path>$ ./ltib -p u-boot -m prep - Now Build:      <Ltib_path>$ ./ltib -p u-boot -m scbuild    After completing this step an u-Boot binary (u-boot.bin) will be saved at <ltib_path>/rpm/BUILD/u-boot-2009.08 4 - Program the SD card Program a SD card with the new u-Boot binary and a bitmap image to be displayed. Insert the SD and run:       $sudo dd if=<ltib_path>/rpm/BUILD/u-boot-2009.08/u-boot.bin of=/dev/mmcblk0 bs=512 "/dev/mmcblk0" should replaced according to your host, use "dmesg" after inserting the SD to find out where is the SD on your host. Unmount it before issuing the dd command. $sudo dd if="your_image".bmp of=/dev/mmcblk0 bs=512 seek=608 Argument seek 608, skips the first 608 blocks of the SD (608x512) where the uboot is stored. If you need to relocate the image, update also the environment variable "splashimage_mmc_init_block", see step 6. 5 - Boot Boot the image from the SD. Personality Board settings:   12345678 SW22 -> 00000000 SW21 -> 11000000    Debug Board settings: SW5,6,7,8,9,10 -> OFF      12345678 SW4 -> 10000001 Turn on the board and stop at u-boot prompt: MX25 U-Boot > 6 - u-Boot environment variables Update u-Boot environment variables for the splash screen to work: The address in memory to load the splash screen from: MX25 U-Boot > setenv splashimage 0x80800000 The SD device on the board: MX25 U-Boot > setenv splashimage_mmc_dev 0 The block on the SD where the bitmap is stored, this must match the block on step 4. MX25 U-Boot > setenv splashimage_mmc_init_block 0x260  The amount in blocks to be read from the SD card, this depends on the bitmap size, i.e. for a 308278 bytes bitmap, 0x2B5 blocks are enough on a 512 bytes per block SD, (308278 / 512). MX25 U-Boot > setenv splashimage_mmc_blkcnt 0x2b5 The SD card block size in bytes: MX25 U-Boot > setenv splashimage_mmc_blksize 512 Save the environment variables: MX25 U-Boot > saveenv Now reboot the board and you should see the splash screen on the LCD. 7 - Booting Linux When Linux takes control of the board it initializes the LCD controller and Framebuffer again. To maintain the splash screen on the LCD you can replace the Linux Logo with the figure used for the splash screen, the side effect is a blink when Linux takes over the LCDC. To achieve this, create a new image in Gimp and save it as ".ppm". Copy it to Linux "logo" folder <ltib_path>/rpm/BUILD/linux-2.6.31/drivers/video/logo Run: $ ppmquant -mapfile clut_vga16.ppm "my_image.ppm" | pnmnoraw > logo_linux_vga16.ppm where: logo_linux_vga16.ppm is the current logo being used by Linux. Recompile the kernel and boot it.
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i.MX6Q Automotive board has one ADV7180 analog video decoder with 2 video inputs. By default, only input 1 is used (connector J42).     To connect 2 analog video sources and switch the display between them, the following changes are needed:   1 - Create a new IOCTL on V4L2_capture and ADV7180 device drivers to receive the information from user space application on what input will be selected. 2 - In this new IOCTL, use the "Fast Switch Script" for ADV7180 described at Analog Devices site: ADV7180 Fast Switch Script | EngineerZone  3 - Create a user space application to call the IOCTL mentioned on step 1.   See attached:   1 -  0001-ADV7180-Adding-input-switch-IOCTL.patch.zip - Patch to be applied on NXP kernel 4.1.15_1.0.0_ga 2 - example2.c.zip - Source code example of user space application. It changes the video input in each 2 seconds. (See it working on attached video) 3 - example2.zip - U ser space application e xecutable file  4 - Makefile.zip - Makefile of user space application to be used as example 5 - adv7180_switch.mp4 - Video showing the application   In the application,  VIDIOC_S_CHIP_INPUT IOCTL is called to change the input:   int input = 0 ; if ( ioctl ( fd_capture_v4l , VIDIOC_S_CHIP_INPUT , & input ) < 0 ) { printf ( "VIDIOC_S_CHIP_INPUT failed\n" ) ; return TFAIL ; } ‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍   This IOCTL calls the ADV7180 Fast Switch Script, added on ADV7180 driver (see attached patch).
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Minicom       It's a simple terminal program, easy to configure and use. Can be downloaded and installed from your Linux package distribution (Synaptic, apt-get, yum) or through this link.       Minicom is a terminal emulation that can access a remote serial console enabling the configuration of Bootloader or the flash file system of the board.   Configuring       Run Minicom calling it from Terminal:     $ minicom       Reach the cofiguration by typing CTRL-A Z Press key Z after releasing CTRL and A. Configure Minicom to work with i.MX, follow the procedure below.   Set the Serial Port       At the screen configuration, type O, choosing Configure Minicom In menu, choose Serial Port Setup Below, the configuration option:       +-----------------------------------------------------------------------+ | A - Serial Device  : /dev/ttyS0                            | | B - Lockfile Location  : /var/lock                          | | C - Callin Program  :                                          | | D - Callout Program  :                                        | | E - Bps/Par/Bits  : 115200 8N1                          | | F - Hardware Flow Control : No                          | | G - Software Flow Control : No                            | |                                                                        | | Change which setting?                                      | +-----------------------------------------------------------------------+       Type the letter of option to enable the modification. Remember to choose the right Serial Device. Screen       Another useful program to use with serial ports is screen. It is a screen manager with VT100/ANSI terminal emulation usually available in Linux distributions. To open serial device /dev/ttyS0, for example, using 115200 baudrate, simply use:     $ screen /dev/ttyS0 115200       To kill the screen manager, use Ctrl + a, k. For a list of useful parameters and commands, try:     $ man screen
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Before reading: only a personal works and sharing, not any form of "release". I didn't find any confidential information from the packages. So, I'm publishing it here. This is only for testing purpose. Do NOT use it for building a product. Use it at your own risk!! Yocto is flexible and powerful, and also, big and slow (when building). Sometimes we only need to build uboot or kernel or some piece of testing code. It's really a waste of time to build-up the whole Yocto environment which may cost over 50GB disk space and over 3 hours of building. I've made some scripts and sum them up to form a toolset for building uboot, kernel and some testing code out of Yocto environment. It's only a simple container and expect to use with uboot and kernel source code from formal Freescale release and a SDK built from Yocto project. GitHub source repo:       https://github.com/gopise/gopbuild What’s made off (a full package, not only the container): 1.    Some scripts and configurations files. 2.    SDK built from Yocto. 3.    Uboot/kernel from specific version. 4.    A hello-world to demonstrate how to build app in this environment. 5.    A slimmed rootfs binary from specific BSP pre-built as base. Will customize base on the source under “rootfs” folder. Only a placeholder in the container-only version. How to use it: Several common used board configurations have been included in the script: 6qsabresd/6qsabreai/6qpsabreai. You can add more into the “gopbuild” script easily. The “sabresd” has been set as default.      If you want to build all for sabresd (First of all, de-compress the package): cd < de - compressed - folder > source envsetup [ It will prompt for selecting board configuration to be built . Choose one by input corresponding number or click < ENTER > for default board . ] gmk ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍      If you want to build specific module for default board, such as uboot: gmk uboot ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍      Build kernel for sabreai board instead of default device: gmk kernel sabreai ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍      Clean everything? gmk all clean ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ After a successfully full build, you will get everything under “output” folder, including a log folder contains full build log:      “u-boot.imx/zImage/rootfs.tar.bz2/*.dtb”, can be used with MFG or uuu.      “fsl-image.sdcard”, can be burn into SD card directly. "Ready-for-building" Package: The "gopbuild" itself is a "container-only" package which doesn't contain any source or SDK. I've also made some packages based on latest BSP release for i.MX6/i.MX7/i.MX8. These packages are "ready-for-build" package which you can de-compress and build it directly. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- URL:https://pan.baidu.com/s/1Xlh1OBGsTRXez_NQw-Rjxg Password: gdc9 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Note: 1. To build for i.MX8 (8QM/8MQ/8QXP), you need L4.14.* or above. 2. To build for i.MX8, please download the SCFW from i.MX software page       i.MX Software and Development Tools | NXP      After download, decompress corresponding package for specific chip and put it under "/platform/scfw/". Take i.MX8QXP for example:             /platform/scfw/scfw_export_mx8qx/ All material (uboot/kernel/test code and SDK) are from official Yocto release. Thanks!
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  This article uses i.MX Linux® User's Guide, Rev. L4.1.15_2.1.0-ga, 05/2017 as an example (it may be found as attachment), please refer to section 4.5.12 (How to build U-Boot and Kernel in standalone environment).   First, generate a development SDK, which includes the tools, toolchain, and small rootfs to compile against to put on the host machine.     • Generate an SDK from the Yocto Project build environment with the following command. To set up the Yocto Project build environment, follow the steps in the i.MX Yocto Project User's Guide (IMXLXYOCTOUG). In the following command, set <Target-Machine> to the machine you are building for.   <Target-Machine> may be one of the following :   • imx6qpsabreauto • imx6qpsabresd • imx6ulevk • imx6ull14x14evk • imx6ull9x9evk • imx6dlsabreauto • imx6dlsabresd • imx6qsabreauto • imx6qsabresd • imx6slevk • imx6sllevk • imx6solosabreauto • imx6solosabresd • imx6sxsabresd • imx6sxsabreauto • imx7dsabresd  The «populate_sdk» generates an script file that sets up environment without Yocto Project. This SDK should be updated for each release to pick up the latest headers, toolchain, and tools from the current release.   $ DISTRO=fsl-imx-fb MACHINE=<Target-Machine> source fsl-setup-release.sh -b build-fb   $ DISTRO=fsl-imx-fb MACHINE=<Target-Machine> bitbake core-image-minimal -c populate_sdk   or   $ bitbake meta-toolchain       • From the build directory, the bitbake was run in, copy the sh file in tmp/deploy/sdk to the host machine to build on and execute the script to install the SDK. The default location is in /opt but can be placed anywhere on the host machine.     Note. Each time you wish to use the SDK in a new shell session, you need to source the environment setup script e.g.    $ . /opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.1.15-2.0.0/environment-setup-cortexa9hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi   or    $ source /opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.1.15-2.0.0/environment-setup-cortexa9hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi   From   Yocto Project Mega-Manual  Note By default, this toolchain does not build static binaries. If you want to use the toolchain to build these types of libraries, you need to be sure your image has the appropriate static development libraries. Use the   IMAGE_INSTALL   variable inside your   local.conf   file to install the appropriate library packages. Following is an example using   glibc   static development libraries:      IMAGE_INSTALL_append = " glibc-staticdev"   On the host machine, these are the steps to build U-Boot and Kernel:  • On the host machine, set the environment with the following command before building.   $ export CROSS_COMPILE=/opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.1.15/environment-setup-cortexa9hf-vfp-neon-pokylinux-gnueabi   $ export ARCH=arm • To build U-Boot, find the configuration for the target boot. In the following example,  i.MX 6ULL is the target.     Download source by cloning with   $ git clone  http://git.freescale.com/git/cgit.cgi/imx/uboot-imx.git  -b imx_v2016.03_4.1.15_2.0.0_ga   $ cd uboot-imx $ make clean $ make mx6ull_14x14_evk_defconfig $ make u-boot.imx   • To build the kernel, execute the following commands:   Download source by cloning with   $ git clone http://git.freescale.com/git/cgit.cgi/imx/linux-imx.git -b imx_4.1.15_2.0.0_ga   $ cd linux-imx $ make defconfig $ make   • To build an application (Hello World) as test.c:   $ source /opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.1.15-2.0.0/environment-setup-cortexa9hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi $ cd ~/test/ $ arm-poky-linux-gnueabi-gcc --sysroot=/opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.1.15-2.0.0/sysroots/cortexa9hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi -mfloat-abi=hard test.c To check if the the compiled code (a.out) is ARM executable   $ file ./a.out   ./a.out: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, EABI5 version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux-armhf.so.3, for GNU/Linux 2.6.32, BuildID[sha1]=0e5c22dcf021748ead2c0bd51a4553cb7d38f6f2, not stripped   Copy file a.out to target Linux filesystem and before run it check again :   root@imx6ul7d:/unit_tests/1# file a.out   a.out: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, EABI5 version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux-armhf.so.3, for GNU/Linux 2.6.32, BuildID[sha1]=0e5c22dcf021748ead2c0bd51a4553cb7d38f6f2, not stripped   To define what Linux libs are needed to run our application :   root@imx6ul7d:/unit_tests/1# ldd a.out     linux-vdso.so.1 (0x7ee93000)   libc.so.6 => /lib/libc.so.6 (0x76e64000)   /lib/ld-linux-armhf.so.3 (0x76f9d000)   If some libs are not located in the filesystem you can observe the following message :   -sh: root@imx6ul7d:/unit_tests/1#./a.out: No such file or directory   Finally - run a.out:   root@imx6ul7d:/unit_tests/1# ./a.out Hello World root@imx6ul7d:/unit_tests/1#
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Using a RAW NAND is more difficult compared to eMMC, but for lower capacity it is still cheaper. Even with the ONFI (Open NAND Flash Interface) you can face initialization issue you can find by measure performance. I will take example of a non-well supported flash, I have installed on my evaluation board (SABRE AI). I wanted to do a simple performance test, to check roughly the MB/s I can expected with this NAND. One of a simplest test is to use the dd command: root@imx6qdlsolo : ~ # time dd if = / dev / mtd4 of = / dev / null 851968 + 0 records in 851968 + 0 records out 436207616 bytes ( 436 MB , 416 MiB ) copied , 131.8884 s , 3.3 MB / s ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ As my RAW was supposed to work in EDO Mode 5, I could expect more than 20MB/s. To check what was wrong, read you kernel startup log: Booting Linux on physical CPU 0x0 Linux version 4.1 . 15 - 2.0 . 0 + gb63f3f5 ( bamboo@yb6 ) ( gcc version 5.3 . 0 ( GCC ) ) # 1 SMP PREEMPT Fri Sep 16 15 : 02 : 15 CDT 2016 CPU : ARMv7 Processor [ 412fc09a ] revision 10 ( ARMv7 ) , cr = 10c53c7d CPU : PIPT / VIPT nonaliasing data cache , VIPT aliasing instruction cache Machine model : Freescale i . MX6 DualLite / Solo SABRE Automotive Board [ . . . ] Amd / Fujitsu Extended Query Table at 0x0040 Amd / Fujitsu Extended Query version 1.3 . number of CFI chips : 1 nand : device found , Manufacturer ID : 0xc2 , Chip ID : 0xdc nand : Macronix MX30LF4G18AC nand : 512 MiB , SLC , erase size : 128 KiB , page size : 2048 , OOB size : 64 gpmi - nand 112000 . gpmi - nand : mode : 5 , failed in set feature . Bad block table found at page 262080 , version 0x01 Bad block table found at page 262016 , version 0x01 nand_read_bbt : bad block at 0x00000a7e0000 nand_read_bbt : bad block at 0x00000dc80000 4 cmdlinepart partitions found on MTD device gpmi - nand Creating 4 MTD partitions on "gpmi-nand" : ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ On line 13 you can read "mode:5, failed in set feature", meaning you are not in mode 5... so you have the "relaxed" timing you have at boot. After debuging your code (I have just remove the NAND back reading security check), you can redo the test: root@imx6qdlsolo : ~ # time dd if = / dev / mtd4 of = / dev / null 851968 + 0 records in 851968 + 0 records out 436207616 bytes ( 436 MB , 416 MiB ) copied , 32.9721 s , 13.2 MB / s‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ So you multiplied the performances by 4! Anyway, you have a better tool to measure your NAND performance, it is mtd_speedtest, but you have to rebuild your kernel. In Yocto, reconfigure your kernel (on your PC of couse!): bitbake virtual / kernel - c menuconfig‍‍ ‍ Choose in the menu "Device Drivers" -> "Memory Technology Device (MTD) support" -> "MTD tests support" , even it it not recommended! bitbake virtual / kernel - f - c compile bitbake virtual / kernel - f - c build bitbake virtual / kernel - f - c deploy‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ Then reflash you board (kernel + rootfs as tests are .ko files): Then you can do more accurate performance test: insmod / lib / modules / 4.1 . 29 - fslc + g59b38c3 / kernel / drivers / mtd / tests / mtd_speedtest . ko dev = 2 == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == = mtd_speedtest : MTD device : 2 mtd_speedtest : MTD device size 16777216 , eraseblock size 131072 , page size 2048 , count of eraseblocks 128 , pages per eraseblock 64 , OOB size 64 mtd_test : scanning for bad eraseblocks mtd_test : scanned 128 eraseblocks , 0 are bad mtd_speedtest : testing eraseblock write speed mtd_speedtest : eraseblock write speed is 4537 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : testing eraseblock read speed mtd_speedtest : eraseblock read speed is 16384 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : testing page write speed mtd_speedtest : page write speed is 4250 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : testing page read speed mtd_speedtest : page read speed is 15784 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : testing 2 page write speed mtd_speedtest : 2 page write speed is 4426 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : testing 2 page read speed mtd_speedtest : 2 page read speed is 16047 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing erase speed mtd_speedtest : erase speed is 244537 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing 2x multi - block erase speed mtd_speedtest : 2x multi - block erase speed is 252061 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing 4x multi - block erase speed mtd_speedtest : 4x multi - block erase speed is 256000 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing 8x multi - block erase speed mtd_speedtest : 8x multi - block erase speed is 260063 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing 16x multi - block erase speed mtd_speedtest : 16x multi - block erase speed is 260063 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing 32x multi - block erase speed mtd_speedtest : 32x multi - block erase speed is 256000 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : Testing 64x multi - block erase speed mtd_speedtest : 64x multi - block erase speed is 260063 KiB / s mtd_speedtest : finished == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == == = ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ You can now achieve almost 16MB/s, better than the dd test. Of course you cannot achieve more than 20MB/s, but you are not that far, and the NAND driver need optimizations. To redo the test: rmmod /lib/modules/4.1.29-fslc+g59b38c3/kernel/drivers/mtd/tests/mtd_speedtest.ko insmod /lib/modules/4.1.29-fslc+g59b38c3/kernel/drivers/mtd/tests/mtd_speedtest.ko dev=2 To check your NAND is in EDO mode 5, you can check your clock tree: / unit_tests / dump - clocks . sh clock          parent   flags    en_cnt pre_cnt      rate [ . . . ] gpmi_bch_apb   -- -       00000005    0        0        198000000 gpmi_bch       -- -       00000005    0        0        198000000 gpmi_io        -- -       00000005    0        0         99000000 gpmi_apb       -- -       00000005    0        0        198000000 ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ The IO are clocked now at 99MHz, thus you can read at 49.5MHz (20ns in EDO mode 5 definition).
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DirectFB DirectFB is a thin library that provides hardware graphics acceleration, input device handling and abstraction, integrated windowing system with support for translucent windows and multiple display layers, not only on top of the Linux Framebuffer Device. It is a complete hardware abstraction layer with software fallbacks for every graphics operation that is not supported by the underlying hardware. DirectFB adds graphical power to embedded systems and sets a new standard for graphics under Linux. [Source: directfb.org] DirectFB Quick Test Select DirectFB in Package List on LTIB1011: [x] DirectFB Select also DirectFB examples: [x] DirectFB examples Build your Linux. Flash your SD card. Launch your Linux image on your board, and then launch a DirectFB example: $ df_dok DirectFB benchmark is launched. Benchmark result on an i.MX 53 EVK:
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This document shows the necessary steps to configure the Eclipse IDE for development of Yocto applications. Requirements 1) Linux machine. Ubuntu 12.4 or higher is recommended. 2) Yocto Freescale BSP Release or Freescale Community BSP. For this example we'll use the Freescale BSP Release L3.14.28 but you may use the FSL Community BSP. - Freescale Community BSP FSL Community BSP - Freescale BSP Release  Documentation L3.14.28 (login required) https://www.freescale.com/webapp/Download?colCode=L3.14.28_1.0.0_LINUX_DOCS&location=null&fpsp=1&WT_TYPE=Supporting%20In… 3) Poky Meta Toolchain (Poky 1.7 / L3.14.28 for our example but you should use the toolchain that corresponds to the BSP that will be used) For information on how to extract and install the meta toolchain please follow the steps on the next document. Task #7 - Create the toolchain 4) Eclipse Luna. We’ll use the Luna SR2 (4.4.2) version of the Eclipse IDE. You may find it on the following website: http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/packages/release/luna/sr2 Look for the “Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers”, which contains the Eclipse Platform, the Java Development Tools (JDT), and the Plug-in Development Environment. Once you have downloaded the tarball extract it. The following command unpacks and installs the downloaded Eclipse IDE tarball into a clean directory using the default name eclipse:      $ cd ~      $ tar -xzvf ~/Downloads/eclipse-cpp-luna-SR2-linux-gtk-x86_64.tar.gz Configuring the Eclipse IDE Once with Eclipse Luna installed you may run the Eclipse IDE with the following command: $ cd eclipse $ ./eclipse Select a new workspace. Chose "Install New Software" from the "Help" pull-down menu. Select the "Luna - http://download.eclipse.org/releases/luna " Find and expand the Linux Tools option and select: Linux Tools LTTng Tracer Control Linux Tools LTTng Userspace Analysis LTTng Kernel Analysis If some of these options are not listed it means that they are already installed. (To change this you may uncheck the Hide items that are already installed box) Find and expand the Mobile and Device Development and select the following:   C/C++ Remote Launch (Requires RSE Remote System Explorer)   Remote System Explorer End-user Runtime   Remote System Explorer User Actions   Target Management Terminal (Core SDK)   TCF Remote System Explorer add-in   TCF Target Explorer If some of these options are not listed it means that they are already installed. (To change this you may uncheck the Hide items that are already installed box) Expand Programming Languages and select:   C/C++ Autotools Support   C/C++ Development Tools Chose Next and accept the necessary EULA Clck on the Finish button. The selected packages will be downloaded and installed. You will be asked to restart Eclipse IDE to finish the installation. Adding the Yocto Plug-in to the Eclipse IDE Next step is to install the Eclipse Yocto Plug-in into the Eclipse IDE. We'll show how to install the pre-built plug in. Start the Eclipse IDE In Eclipse, select "Install new Software" from the "Help" menu Click the "Add..." button to add a repository and enter: Name: Any name, we will use Yocto Fio Location: http://downloads.yoctoproject.org/releases/eclipse-plugin/1.8/luna Click "Ok" and then chose this new repository on the "Work with" drop-down menu and select the following plug-ins from the list:   Yocto Project ADT Plug-in   Yocto Project Bitbake Commander Plug-in   Yocto Project Documentation plug-in Install these plug-ins and click "OK" when prompted about installing software that contains unsigned content. You may be asked to restart the Eclipse IDE. Configuring the Eclipse Yocto Plug-in With all the necessary packages installed we'll now configure the Eclipse Yocto Plug-in. In this steps we will configure the Cross Compiler options and the Target options. These will then be used as default for your projects from within your working workspace. Select "Preferences" from the "Window" menu. Click on Yocto Project ADT from the left options and then under Cross Compiler Options select the Standalone pre-built toolchain radio button. We need to point to the Toolchain Root location of our installed toolchain. This is covered on the following community document: Task #7 - Create the toolchain In this case we'll be using poky 1.7 tollchain which has the following default location: /opt/poky/1.7 As fo the Sysroot Location this would correspond to your build directory sysroot folder, which is located on the following path: <YOCTO_BSP_DIR>/<BUILD_DIR>/tmp/sysroots/<MACHINE> In our case our Tartget architecture would be the Cortex-A9, which correspond to the i.MX6 and which is also the only option installed on the chosen directory. For Target Options we would be using the actual HW in order to test our application so keep the External HW option selected. Creating a Hello World Project We are now ready to create our project. Just to test our configuration we'll create a Hello World project.We can do so by selecting File->New->C Project or C++ Project We must then select a Project name and in project type we can chose either an Empty project or as in our case a Hello World Project, all this under the Yocto Project ADT Autotools Project folder. We will have the GNU Autotools Tolchain selected. The next screen will show some of the Basic Properties for our project, including the GNU license. Fill these as required. You may clock on Finish at this point. We should see that the HelloWorld project was created. We should right-click on the project folder and then chose Reconfigure Project in order to fill the necessary libraries. After this is completed we can build our project either by choosing the hammer icon or in the Build Project option inside the Project menu. We can look for correct competition or any errors or warning on the Console tab. Further Application Development After this basic setup you may work on more complex examples like a GPU and a Gstreamer Application examples on the following nicely written document: Yocto Application Development Using Eclipse IDE
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