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  Just sharing some experiences during the development and studying.   Although, it appears some hardwares, it focuses on software to speed up your developing on your  hardware.     杂记共享一下在开发和学习过程中的经验。    虽然涉及一些硬件,但其本身关注软件,希望这些能加速您在自己硬件上的开发。   08/03/2022   i.MX8MM SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MM-SDCARD-Secondary-Boot-Demo/ta-p/1500011     02/16/2022 mx8_ddr_stress_test without UI   https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/mx8-ddr-stress-test-without-UI/ta-p/1414090   12/23/2021 i.MX8 i.MX8X Board Reset https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8-i-MX8X-Board-Reset/ta-p/1391130       12/21/2021 regulator userspace-consumer https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/regulator-userspace-consumer/ta-p/1389948     11/24/2021 crypto af_alg blackkey demo crypto af_alg blackkey demo - NXP Community   09/28/2021 u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) - NXP Community     08/17/2021 gpio-poweroff demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/gpio-poweroff-demo/ta-p/1324306         08/04/2021 How to use gpio-hog demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/How-to-use-gpio-hog-demo/ta-p/1317709       07/14/2021 SWUpdate OTA i.MX8MM EVK / i.MX8QXP MEK https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/SWUpdate-OTA-i-MX8MM-EVK-i-MX8QXP-MEK/ta-p/1307416     04/07/2021 i.MX8QXP eMMC Secondary Boot https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/i-MX8QXP-eMMC-Secondary-Boot/ba-p/1257704#M45       03/25/2021 sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition from A core side sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition fr... - NXP Community     03/17/2021 How to Changei.MX8X MEK+Base Board  Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8X-MEK-Base-Board-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1246779#M43     03/16/2021 How to Change i.MX8MM evk Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8MM-evk-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1243938#M40       05/06/2020 Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's environment variables Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's env... - NXP Community     03/30/2020 i.MX6 DDR calibration/stress for Mass Production https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-346065     03/25/2020 parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345998     02/17/2020 Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground      01/15/2020 How to add  iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup How to add iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup    01/09/2020 Understand iMX8QX Hardware Partitioning By Making M4 Hello world Running Correctly https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345359   09/29/2019 Docker On i.MX6UL With Ubuntu16.04 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344462   09/25/2019 Docker On i.MX8MM With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344473 Docker On i.MX8QXP With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344474     08/28/2019 eMMC5.0 vs eMMC5.1 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344265     05/24/2019 How to upgrade  Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU How to upgrade Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU     04/12/2019 eMMC RPMB Enhance and GP https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343116   04/04/2019 How to Dump a GPT SDCard Mirror(Android O SDCard Mirror) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343079   04/04/2019 i.MX Create Android SDCard Mirror https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343078   04/02/2019: i.MX Linux Binary_Demo Files Tips  https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343075   04/02/2019:       Update Set fast boot        eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf   02/28/2019: imx_builder --- standalone build without Yocto https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-342702   08/10/2018: i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG update    Update slide CMA Arrangement Consideration i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_08102018.pdf   07/26/2018 Understand ML With Simplest Code https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341099     04/23/2018:     i.MX8M Standalone Build     i.MX8M Standalone Build.pdf     04/13/2018:      i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG  update            Add slide CMA Arrangement  Consideration     i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_04132018.pdf   09/05/2017:       Update eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 09/01/2017:       eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 08/30/2017:     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display(For i.MX6DQ/DLS)     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display.pdf 08/27/2017:  L3.14.28 Ottbox Porting Notes:         L3.14.28_Ottbox_Porting_Notes-20150805-2.pdf MFGTool Uboot Share With the Normal Run One:        MFGTool_Uboot_share_with_NormalRun_sourceCode.pdf Mass Production with programmer        Mass_Production_with_NAND_programmer.pdf        Mass_Production_with_emmc_programmer.pdf AndroidSDCARDMirrorCreator https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-329596 L3.10.53 PianoPI Porting Note        L3.10.53_PianoPI_PortingNote_151102.pdf Audio Codec WM8960 Porting L3.10.53 PianoPI        AudioCodec_WM8960_Porting_L3.10.53_PianoPI_151012.pdf TouchScreen PianoPI Porting Note         TouchScreen_PianoPI_PortingNote_151103.pdf Accessing GPIO From UserSpace        Accessing_GPIO_From_UserSpace.pdf        https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343344 FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX        FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX.pdf i.MX6SX M4 fastup        i.MX6SX M4 fastup.pdf i.MX6 SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo        i.MX6_SDCARD_Secondary_Boot_Demo.pdf i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG        i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_10082016.pdf Security        Security03172017.pdf    NOT related to i.MX, only a short memo
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In some cases, i.MX board connect to different module. It has very tiny changes, such as just one gpio different driver strength. We can build an entire new software to handle this requirement. Here we introduce another way, using u-boot to modify the device tree(dtb) at runtime.   Here is u-boot fdt command for  How to use gpio-hog demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/How-to-use-gpio-hog-demo/ta-p/1317709   run loadfdt fdt addr ${fdt_addr_r} fdt print /soc/bus/pinctrl/uart3grp fdt rm /soc/bus/pinctrl/uart3grp fdt print serial2 fdt set serial2 status disabled fdt print serial2 fdt print gpio4 fdt resize fdt mknode gpio4 gpio_hog_demo fdt set gpio4/gpio_hog_demo gpio-hog fdt set gpio4/gpio_hog_demo gpios <7 0> fdt set gpio4/gpio_hog_demo output-high fdt print gpio4 run mmcargs run loadimage booti ${loadaddr} - ${fdt_addr_r} root@imx8mmevk:~# cat /sys/kernel/debug/gpio gpiochip0: GPIOs 0-31, parent: platform/30200000.gpio, 30200000.gpio: gpio-5 ( |PCIe DIS ) out hi gpio-13 ( |ir-receiver ) in hi IRQ ACTIVE LOW gpio-15 ( |cd ) in hi IRQ ACTIVE LOW gpiochip1: GPIOs 32-63, parent: platform/30210000.gpio, 30210000.gpio: gpio-38 ( |? ) out hi gpio-42 ( |reset ) out lo ACTIVE LOW gpio-51 ( |regulator-usdhc2 ) out lo gpiochip2: GPIOs 64-95, parent: platform/30220000.gpio, 30220000.gpio: gpio-80 ( |status ) out hi gpiochip3: GPIOs 96-127, parent: platform/30230000.gpio, 30230000.gpio: gpio-117 ( |PCIe reset ) out hi gpiochip4: GPIOs 128-159, parent: platform/30240000.gpio, 30240000.gpio: gpio-135 ( |gpio_hog_demo ) out hi gpio-141 ( |spi1 CS0 ) out hi ACTIVE LOW gpio-149 ( |wlf,mute ) out hi ACTIVE LOW root@imx8mmevk:~# [ 33.758914] VSD_3V3: disabling dtc_utils-v1.6.1-win-x86_64.zip by msys2   
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We will build a remote debug environmet of Qt Creator in this user guide.   Contents 1 Change local.conf file in Yocto 2 2 Build and deploy Yocto SDK 2 2.1 Build full image SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.2 Deploy SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Configure QT Kit 2 3.1 Setup device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.2 Configure QT version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.3 Configure gcc and g++ manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.4 Configure gdb manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.5 Configure Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.6 Very important thing!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4 Test result
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SWUpdate: Embedded Systems become more and more complex. Software for Embedded Systems have new features and fixes can be updated in a reliable way. Most of time, we need OTA(Over-The-Air) to upgrade the system. Like Android has its own update system. Linux also need an update system. SWUpdate project is thought to help to update an embedded system from a storage media or from network. However, it should be mainly considered as a framework, where further protocols or installers (in SWUpdate they are called handlers) can be easily added to the application. Mongoose daemon mode: Mongoose is a daemon mode of SWUpdate that provides a web server, web interface and web application. Mongoose is running on the target board(i.MX8MM EVK/i.MX8QXP MEK).Using Web browser to access it.   Suricatta daemon mode: Suricatta regularly polls a remote server for updates, downloads, and installs them. Thereafter, it reboots the system and reports the update status to the server. The screenshot is SWUpdate scuricatta working with hawkbit server.          
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Hello everyone, this document will explain on how to create and run a custom script for UUU (Universal Update Utility) tool Requirements: I.MX 8M Mini EVK Linux Binary Demo Files - i.MX 8MMini EVK (L5.10.35) UUU Serial console emulator (tera term or putty) Text editor (Notepad++, nano, etc) UUU is a pretty flexible tool since it uses the Fastboot protocol through uboot to flash the desired images, this will make possible to create a custom script to add many uboot commands to customize further the boot settings. In this example I will create a custom script which will flash uboot and Linux rootfs and write a Cortex-M binary to the FAT partition of the eMMC. At the same time I’ll create and modify a set of environmental variables, this variables will have a set of uboot commands that will load to the TCM this same binary before the device starts booting into Linux.   Creating the script For this document I'll be using Notepad++ but any text editor may be used instead, since the scripts used by UUU are written in plain text. The very first line of the script must be the version number which will represent the minimum UUU version that UUU can parse this script. For this case that version is 1.2.39 After it, we will add all standard commands to flash uboot and filesystem into the eMMC. Note: This may be also copied from the uuu.auto script inside the Demo files. Please note that the UUU commands format is PROTOCOL: CMD, for this example we will be using mainly SDP and FB protocols which corresponds to the serial download protocol and Fastboot respectively. For a list of all supported UUU protocols and commands please refer to the UUU documentation here: https://github.com/NXPmicro/mfgtools/releases/download/uuu_1.4.165/UUU.pdf Now add the following commands to the script, this will download and write into eMMC FAT partition, which was created when flashing the .wic image, the Cortex-M binary.   FB: ucmd setenv fastboot_buffer ${loadaddr} FB: download -f hello_world_test.bin FB[-t 20000]: ucmd fatwrite mmc ${emmc_dev}:1 ${fastboot_buffer} hello_world_test.bin ${fastboot_bytes}   #fatwrite write file into a dos filesystem "<interface> <dev[:part]> <addr> <filename> [<bytes> [<offset>]] - write file 'filename' from the address 'addr' in RAM  to 'dev' on 'interface' Note: The Cortex-M binary was named as hello_world_test.bin, but any example name may be used. At this point, in the script we will be using only uboot commands as seen above, in this case was fatwrite. The script will look as following: If the script is run now uboot (imx-boot-imx8mmevk-sd.bin-flash_evk), rootfs (imx-image-multimedia-imx8mmevk.wic) will be flashed and the Cortex-M binary (hello_world_test.bin) written to the FAT partition of the eMMC. To add environmental variables to modify uboot boot settings, i.e. overwrite the dtb variable so the EVK will select the RPMSG dtb, this in case the Cortex-M example needs to be run at the same time as Cortex-A. FB: ucmd setenv fdtfile imx8mm-evk-rpmsg.dtb Next add to the UUU script the set of uboot commands in form of environmental variables that will load to the TCM the Cortex-M binary   FB: ucmd setenv loadm4image "fatload mmc ${emmc_dev}:1 0x48000000 hello_world_test.bin; cp.b 0x48000000 0x7e0000 0x20000" FB: ucmd setenv m4boot "run loadm4image; bootaux 0x48000000" Note: This can be changed to load it to different targets not only TCM, for example DRAM. Now for the set of environmental variable to run when uboot starts booting into Linux we may add it to the variable mmcboot. Also adding the command to save the environmental variables set so the settings persist after reboot, this by adding the following commands to the script:   FB: ucmd setenv mmcboot "run m4boot; $mmcboot" FB: ucmd saveenv The resulting script will be the following: Now just save the script and name it as you see fit, for this example the name will be custom_script.auto.   Running the script To run a UUU script is pretty simple, just make sure that the files used in the script are in the same folder as the script. Windows > .\uuu.exe  custom_script.auto Linux $ sudo ./uuu custom_script.auto   Wait till it finish, turn the board off, set it to boot from eMMC and turn it on, the EVK will boot into Linux automatically and will launch the Cortex-M core automatically. We may also, double check that the environmental variables were written correctly by stopping at uboot and using the printenv command For this test I have used the Prebuilt image which includes sample Cortex-M4 examples for the EVK   further flexibility UUU scripts can be customized even more, for example using macros, so the script can take input arguments so it may be possible to select the uboot, rootfs, Cortex-M binary and dtb to be used when booting, and to be used for other i.MX chips as well. The resulting script will be as following: Note: Here is assumed that the dtb file is already at the FAT partition, if not same procedure may be added as the Cortex-M binary. To run a script which expect to have input arguments is as follow: Windows > .\uuu.exe -b uuu_cortexM_loader.auto imx-boot-imx8mmevk-sd.bin-flash_evk imx-image-multimedia-imx8mmevk.wic hello_world_test.bin imx8mm-evk-rpmsg.dtb Linux $ sudo ./uuu -b uuu_cortexM_loader.auto imx-boot-imx8mmevk-sd.bin-flash_evk imx-image-multimedia-imx8mmevk.wic hello_world_test.bin imx8mm-evk-rpmsg.dtb Please find both UUU scripts attached and feel free to use them. Hope this helps everyone to better understand how this tool works and the capabilities it have.
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This article will describe one suggestion for one issue that UART continuously generate RX interrupts and receive 0xFF even when Rx line is continuously high in some cases on imx6 series. Below I will explain with imx6DL. Some settings are just to make it easier to reproduce. BSP version: L5.4.70-2.3.0 Board HW: MCIMX6DL-SDB When issue happen Config imx6DL UART3 as the serial port to 1200 baud, 8-N-1 format. Keep the RX Line high. Make the RX line low and keep it for a short time (360 usec-370 usec).   At this condition, you will find that the UART will continuously generate RX interrupts and show receiving 0xFF even you make the RX line return to be high. Why issue happen The low time is not in the correct range and out of our spec. In the imx6DL AEC document, there is one chapter named UART Receiver like blow   If using 1200 band, that means one valid bit time is 833 usec. And there is a definition that “tolerate 1/(16 x Fbaud_rate) tolerance in each bit”. That’s means in the case of 1200 baud. A range of valid bit is 781 to 885 usec. But is reproducing, the Low level time is 360 usec. This time out of range will make UART state machine to be confused. How to fix Actually, the best way is following our spec. If there is such an unknown situation in the customer’s environment, then the following method could be regarded as a suggestion to fix the issue meet by the customer. The interrupt handler will check USR1[AWAKE]. 2    If AWAKE is asserted, clear it and proceed as usual (assume we have valid data), else, check if USR1[AGTIM] is asserted. 3    if AGTIM is asserted, clear it and proceed as usual, else perform software reset (assume we have invalid data). Checking AGTIM is for one race condition when the RX fifo has some characters (less than RXTL) but no more data is coming in. When following this procedure, the UART will perform a software reset when a block interrupt occurs. Notes: From customer report, error could be cleared if a valid start-bit is detected on the RX line. This needs to be verified by the customer themselves. Test code has been included in attachment.   Besst Regards
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response. i.MX 6/7 Series Family DDR Tools Overview This page contains the latest releases for the i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools. The tools described on this page cover the following i.MX 6/7 series SoCs: i.MX 6DQP (Dual/Quad Plus) i.MX 6DQ (Dual/Quad) i.MX 6DL/S (Dual Lite/Solo) i.MX 6SoloX i.MX 6SL i.MX 6SLL i.MX 6UL i.MX 6ULL/ULZ i.MX 7D/S i.MX 7ULP The purpose of the i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools is to enable users to generate and test a custom DRAM initialization based on their device configuration (density, number of chip selects, etc.) and board layout (data bus bit swizzling, etc.). This process equips the user to then proceed with the bring-up of a boot loader and an OS. Once the OS is brought up, it is recommended to run an OS-based memory test (like Linux memtester) to further verify and test the DDR memory interface. The i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools consist of: DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) DDR Stress test _________________________________________________________ i.MX 6/7 Series DDR Stress Test The i.MX 6/7 Series DDR stress test tool is a Windows-based software tool that is used as a mechanism to verify that the DDR initialization is operational prior for use in u-boot and OS bring-up. The DDR Stress Test tool can be found here: i.MX 6/7 DDR Stress Test Tool Note that the DDR Stress test tool supports all of the above i.MX SoCs, however, some of the supported i.MX SoCs named in the tool support multiple i.MX SoCs as follows: MX6DQ – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6DQ and i.MX 6DQP (Plus) MX6DL – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6DL and i.MX 6S (i.MX 6DLS family) MX6ULL – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6ULL and i.MX6 ULZ MX7D – when selected, this supports both i.MX 7D and i.MX 7S _____________________________________________________________________________ i.MX 6/7 Series DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) The i.MX 6/7 series DDR RPA (or simply RPA) is an Excel spreadsheet tool used to develop DDR initialization for a user’s specific DDR configuration (DDR device type, density, etc.). The RPA generates the DDR initialization script for use with the DDR Stress Test tool. For a history of the previous versions of an RPA, refer to the Revision History tab of the respective RPA. To obtain the latest RPAs, please refer to the following links: i.MX 6DQP i.MX6DQP Register Programming Aids i.MX 6DQ i.MX6DQ Register Programming Aids i.MX 6DL/S i.MX6DL Register Programming Aids i.MX 6SoloX i.MX6SX Register Programming Aids i.MX 6SL i.MX6SL Register Programming Aids  i.MX6SLL i.MX6SLL Register Programming Aids i.MX 6UL/ULL/ULZ i.MX6UL/ULL/ULZ DRAM Register Programming Aids i.MX7D i.MX7D DRAM Register Programming Aids i.MX 7ULP i.MX7ULP DRAM Register Programming Aids _____________________________________________________________________________ DRAM Register Programming Aids FAQ    
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  Question: How can we generate an ARM DS5 DStream format DDR initialization script using the DRAM Register Programming Aid?  Answer: Some RPAs include a  "DStream .ds file" tab for the ARM DS5 debugger specific commands. The i.MX6UL/ULL/ULZ DRAM Register Programming Aids for example already has this supported. However, the user can easily create  the .ds format from the existing .inc format. The basic steps to convert .inc files to .ds format are as follows: 1)  Replace the one instance of setmem /16 with mem set 2)  In that same line, replace 0x020bc000 = with 0x020bc000 16 3)  Use a Replace All command to change setmem /32 with mem set 4)  Use a Replace All command to change = with 32 5)  Use a Replace All command to change // with # 6)  Save as a .ds file.   Question: When using a 528MHz DRAM Controller interface with a DDR memory of a faster speed bin, which speed bin timing options should one use? Answer: For example, let’s assume our MX6DQ design is using a DDR3 memory from a DDR3-1600 speed bin.  However, the maximum speed of the MMDC interface for the MX6DQ using DDR3 is 528MHz.  Should we use the 1600 speed bin (800MHz clock speed) or the 1066 speed bin (533MHz clock speed)?  In short, the user should use the timings rated for the maximum speed (frequency) with which you are running, in this case DDR3-1066 (533MHz).  In some cases, like when using the MX6DL, the maximum DDR frequency is 400MHz.  In this case, you would want to try and use 800 timings found in the AC timing parameters table.  However, most DDR3 devices have speed bin tables that may go only as low as 1066, in which case you would use the closest speed bin to your operational frequency (i.e. the 1066 speed bin table).     Question: Some timing parameters may specify a min and max number, which should I use? Answer: In most cases, you will want to choose the minimum timings.  Some DRAM controllers may have a tRAS_MAX timing parameter, in which case you would obviously use the maximum tRAS parameter given in the DRAM data sheet. Also, for timing parameters tAONPD and tAOFPD, we also want to use the maximum values given in the DDR3 data sheet. These represent the maximum amount of time the DDR3 device takes to turn on or off the RTT (termination), therefore, we should wait at least this amount of time before issuing any commands or accesses.   Question: Some timing parameters state things like “Greater of 3CK or 7.5ns”; which should I use? Answer: This depends on your clock speed.  Say you are running at 533MHz.  At 533MHz, 7.5ns equates to 4CKs.  In this case, 7.5ns at 533MHz is GREATER than 3CK, so we would use the 7.5ns number, or 4CKs. At 400MHz, 7.5ns equates to 3CKs.  In this case, we’d simply use 3CKs.   Question: I have a design that will throttle the DDR frequency (dynamic frequency scaling).  At full speed, I plan to run at 533MHz, and then I plan to throttle down to say 400MHz whenever possible.  Do I need to re-calculate my 400 MHz timing parameters that were initially set for 533MHz? Answer: It is not necessary to re-calculate timing parameters for 400MHz, and you can re-use the ones for 533MHz.  The timings at 533 MHz are much tighter than 400 MHz, and the key here is to NOT violate timings.  Also, it may be a bit of a hassle maintaining two sets of timing parameters, especially if later in the design, you swap DDR vendors that might require you to re-calculate some timing parameters.  It’s easier to do it once and to come up with a combined worse-case timing parameters for 533MHz, which you know will work at 400MHz.  But, if you don’t mind maintaining two sets of timing parameters, and really want to optimize timings down to the last pico-second for 400MHz, then knock yourself out.   Question: Can I use these Register programming aids for both Fly by and T- Topology ? Answer Yes The DDR register programming aid is agnostic to the DDR layout. The same spreadsheet works for both topologies. We recommend running write leveling calibration for both topologies and the values returned by the Write Leveling routine from the Freescale DDR stress test should be incorporated back to the customer specific initialization script. The DDR stress test also has a feature whereby it evaluates the write leveling values returned from calibration and increments WALAT to 1 if the values exceed a defined limit. The DDR stress test informs the user when the Write Additional latency (WALAT) exceeds the limit and should be increased by 1, and reminds the user to add it back in the customer specific initialization script if required.   WALAT - 0 00000000 WALAT: Write Additional latency. Recommend to clear these bits. Proper board design should ensure that the DDR3 devices are placed close enough to the MMDC to ensure the skew between CLK and DQS is less than 1 cycle.     Question: Can I use the DEFAULT Register programming aid values for MDOR when using an Internal OSC instead of the recommended 32.768 KHZ XTAL ? Answer No, NXP recommends reprogramming these values based on the worse case frequency (Max clock) of the internal OSC of the device to guarantee JEDEC timings are met. Please refer to  Internal Oscillator Accuracy considerations for the i.MX 6 Series for more details  
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response.   This is a detailed programming aid for the registers associated with MMDC initialization. The last sheet formats the register settings for use with ARM RealView ICE. It can also be used with the windows executable for the DDR Stress Test. This programming aid was used for internal NXP validation boards.
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response.   This is the detailed programming aid for the registers associated with DRAM initialization (DDR3 and LPDDR2) of the MX6UL/ULL/ULZ (consolidated RPA). The last work sheet tab in the tool formats the register settings for use with the ARM DS5/RealView debugger. It can be manually converted by the user to a DCD file format used by uboot or other bootloaders (note the removal of debugger specific commands in this tab). The programming aids were developed for internal NXP validation and development boards.   This tool serves as an aid to assist with programming the DDR interface of the MX6UL/ULL/ULZ and is based on the DDR initialization scripts developed by the R&D team and no guarantees are made by this tool.   The following are some general notes regarding this tool: Refer to the "How To Use" tab in the tool as a starting point to use this tool. Note that in the "DStream .ds file" tab there are DS5 debugger specific commands that should be commented out or removed when using the DRAM initialization for non-debugger specific applications (like when porting to bootloaders). This tool may be updated on an as-needed basis for bug fixes or future improvements.  There is no schedule for aforementioned maintenance.  
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      The i.MX6UL/LL/LZ processor supports 2 USB OTG interfaces, USB OTG1 and USB OTG2, and each USB interface can be configured as a device, host or dual role mode. On the EVK board of i.MX6UL/LL, USB OTG1 is designed as dual role mode, and USB OTG2 is designed as HOST mode. This is sufficient for most customers.       However, in actual applications, we may need 2 USB HOSTs, and at the same time, we don’t want to use MicroUSB to USB TYPE-AF cable for Host-Device mode conversion. Therefore, the design of the USB circuit needs to meet such requirements: 1. USB device mode We need a USB device to download the linux image to the flash or SD card on the board. 2. 2 USB HOSTs When the system is working normally, we need the board to support 2 USB HOST. i.MX6UL/LL/LZ has only 2 USB ports. How to design to meet this requirement without increasing the USB HUB? The following scheme is used as a reference, and I hope it will be helpful to customers with similar requirement:        The logic and application description of this Diagram: : Default—device mode In the process of debugging the software, we need to use the USB OTG interface to download the linux image, so it must work in device mode. What we need to do is: (1). Pull USB OTG ID up to 3.3V (2). The USB OTG D+/D- signal is switched to the MicroUSB connector. (3). The USB OTG VBUS is provided with 5V power from the external PC USB HOST. Usage:        -Use a jumper for Pin 1 and Pin2, USB OTG ID pin will be pulled up to High.        With the operation, SEL pin of USB Muxer is High, and USB signals are switched to port B, and USB differential signals are connected to MicroUSB connector. At the same time, MIC2026-1YM output is disabled. The USB OTG1 VBUS pin of CPU is supplied by VBUS of MicroUSB connector, that is to say, supplied by PC USB HOST.        In this mode, software engineer can use it to download images to flash on board. Normal Work—Host mode After the software debugging is completed, two HOSTs are needed on the board. At this time, we need to switch the USB OTG1 from device to HOST mode. What we need to do is: (1). Pull USB OTG1 ID down to LOW (2). The USB OTG D+/D- signal is switched to the USB Type-AF connector. (3). Board should supply 5V power for USB device connected USB Type-AF connector. Usage:        -Use a jumper for Pin 2 and Pin3, USB OTG ID pin will be pulled down to Low.        With the operation, USB OTG1 ID pin is pulled down to Low, SEL pin of USB Muxer is also LOW, USB signals are switched to Port A, and connected to USB type-AF connector. At the same time, MIC2026-1YM is enabled , OUTA will output 5V , which will supply USB device connected on USB type-AF connector.   [Note] Users need to pay attention to. When using the jumper with PIN1/2/3, the board needs to be powered off. In other words, when switching between device and host, you need to switch off the power, then power on, and restart the board. The solution can also be used for i.MX processors with USB 2.0 interface.   NXP CAS team Wedong Sun 01/15/2021
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Recently, some customers are using i.MX processor, they want to add raid & LVM function support to the kernel, but they have encountered the problem that the compilation cannot pass. Tested it in L4.14.98, L4.19.35 & L5.4.x, Only L4.14.98 bsp exists the problem. Here are the experimental steps I have done, including the same problems I encountered with the customer, and how to modify the kernel to ensure that the compilation passes. 1. Exporting cross compilation tool chain from yocto BSP (1) Downloading Yocto BSP and compiling it. Following steps in i.MX_Yocto_Project_User's_Guide.pdf, download Yocto BSP and compile it successfully. (2) Exporting cross compilation tool chain Following methods described in i.MX_Linux_User's_Guide.pdf, export cross compilation tool chain from yocto BSP. See Chapter 4.5.12 of the document, please! Then cross compilation tool chain will be like below: (3) Copying linux BSP source code to a new directory # cd ~ # mkdir L4.14.98-2.0.0 # cd L4.14.98-2.0.0 # cp -r ~/imx-yocto-bsp/build-fb/tmp/work/imx6qsabresd-poky-linux-gnueabi/linux-imx/4.14.98- r0/git ./ Then all linux source code has been copied to L4.14.98-2.0.0, which is the top directory of linux kernel source code, I will compile kernel image here. 2. Compiling linux kernel # cd ~/L4.14.98-2.0.0 # source /opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.14-sumo/environment-setup-cortexa9hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi # export ARCH=arm # make imx_v7_defconfig # make menuconfig Then we will add RAID and LVM modules to linux kernel. In order to reproduce errors, I added all related modules to kernel. See below, please! Device drivers---->Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM) After save and exit, began to compile kernel. # make (make –j4) The following errors will occur: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- drivers/md/dm-rq.c: In function ‘dm_old_init_request_queue’: drivers/md/dm-rq.c:716:2: error: implicit declaration of function ‘elv_register_queue’; did you mean ‘blk_register_queue’? [-Werror=implicit-function-declaration] elv_register_queue(md->queue); ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ blk_register_queue cc1: some warnings being treated as errors scripts/Makefile.build:326: recipe for target 'drivers/md/dm-rq.o' failed make[2]: *** [drivers/md/dm-rq.o] Error 1 scripts/Makefile.build:585: recipe for target 'drivers/md' failed make[1]: *** [drivers/md] Error 2 Makefile:1039: recipe for target 'drivers' failed make: *** [drivers] Error 2 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3. Finding out root cause and solving it (1) elv_register_queue( ) function The function is loaded in dm-rq.c : int dm_old_init_request_queue(struct mapped_device *md, struct dm_table *t) { … … elv_register_queue(md->queue); … … } BUT compiler didn’t find it’s declaration and entity. Searching source code, and found it declared in linux_top/block/blk.h: … … int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q); … … It’s entity is in linux_top/block/elevator.c: int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q) { … … } (2) Adding declaration and exporting the function --- Declaration Add the line below to dm-rq.c: … … extern int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q); … … --- Exporting the function(elevator.c) Add EXPORT_SYMBOL(elv_register_queue); to the end of function, see below. int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q) { … … } EXPORT_SYMBOL(elv_register_queue); 4. Re-compiling Linux Kernel The above error will not occur and the compilation will complete successfully.   NXP CAS team Weidong Sun
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Hello everyone, In this document I'll explain on how to build the UUU (Universal Update Utility) using windows 10 PC. This may be useful in case of adding custom commands to run during the flash using built-in scripts, be it for debugging, fuse blowing, etc. First we need to download and install Visual Studio community, for this guide I'll use community 2019, version it is available here: https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/thank-you-downloading-visual-studio/?sku=Community&rel=16 For workloads select Universal Windows Platform development.   When installing, make sure to select and install the Git for windows complement, at the top select Individual components, this will display a new list, scroll down to code tools and you will find Git for windows, check this box In case Visual Studio is already installed, you may open the installer again and chose modify, this will let you install the complement as well. After the installation is complete we may run the git commands on the power shell. Now open the windows power shell and type the following commands: git clone https://github.com/NXPmicro/mfgtools.git // clones the MFGTool (UUU) source code from the github cd mfgtools // enters the mfgtools folder we just cloned git submodule init // creates the local configuration file for the submodules git submodule update // set the submodules to the commit specified by the main repository. At this point we can edit the built in scripts to add our custom commands, for this guide I'll add the printenv uboot command at the end of the flashing process. For this I'll enter the folder mfgtools/uuu, and edit emmc_burn_all.lst with any text editor, i.e. Notepad ++, add the command FB: ucmd printenv.   Save and close the editor, it is possible to add most uboot commands like for example the fuse commands to burn eFuses. Then we can now build the tool, opening msvc/uuu-static-link.sln with Visual studio, select solution uuu-static-link.sln   And finally build the solution: The executable (uuu.exe) would be at the following path: mfgtools\msvc\x64\Debug   Finally we run the built in script we modified and check the results. Find attached both the powershell and uboot logs, I tested this using an i.MX8MN with L5.4.47_2.2.0, running the following command: ./uuu.exe -v -b emmc_all imx-boot-imx8mnevk-sd.bin-flash_evk imx-image-full-imx8mnevk.wic Hope this may found useful for anyone trying to achieve something similar.
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Description       This doc explain how to enable the plugin boot on i.MX6Q/6DL and which used for change the pll2 clock and add the spread spectrum support to pass the EMI test. we still list the source codes of 3.0.35 and 4.1.15. to explain the dts/non-dts kernel support.       本文旨在说明如何在i.MX6Q/6DL上实现plugin启动,以支持展频和改变pll2的频率,其目的是为了通过 EMI测试。也附上了基于3.0.35和4.1.15的源代码,以供参考   Products Product Category NXP Part Number URL MPU i.MX6 Family https://www.nxp.com/products/processors-and-microcontrollers/arm-processors/i-mx-applications-processors/i-mx-6-processors:IMX6X_SERIES   Tools NXP Development Board URL i.MX6 SabreSDP https://www.nxp.com/design/development-boards:EVDEBRDSSYS#/collection=softwaretools&start=0&max=25&query=typeTax%3E%3Et633::archived%3E%3E0::Sub_Asset_Type%3E%3ETSP::deviceTax%3E%3Ec731_c380_c127_c126&sorting=Buy%2FSpecifications.desc&language=en&siblings=false          Version: MX6Q_PLUGIN_FC_SSC_V7-20200915_chn..pdf(chinese version)add baidou support MX6Q_PLUGIN_FC_SSC_V7-20170504_eng-chapter-imx6dl.doc+MX6Q_PLUGIN_FC_SSC_V3-20170309_eng.doc(english version)      
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