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The following steps allow you to enable rgb led's and push buttons on 8MIC-RPI-MX8 board with i.MX 8M Mini Applications Processor Evaluation Kit (EVKB). You have to use a led driver and change the device tree. On the Host. linux-imx repo.   Clone the i.MX Linux Kernel repo. git clone https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/linux-imx Switch to a particular version of Linux source code using git. cd linux-imx/ git checkout -b RGB ef3f2cfc6010 Device tree.   Obtain the "0001-Enable-RGB-LED-s-and-push-buttons-on-8MIC-RPI-MX8-bo.patch" file and copy it into linux-imx directory, then apply the patch. cp 0001-Enable-RGB-LED-s-and-push-buttons-on-8MIC-RPI-MX8-bo.patch ~/linux-imx/ cd ~/linux-imx/ patch < 0001-Enable-RGB-LED-s-and-push-buttons-on-8MIC-RPI-MX8-bo.patch Select the file to patch: File to patch: arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/imx8mm-evk-8mic-revE.dts patching file arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/imx8mm-evk-8mic-revE.dts Then setup your toolchain, for example: source /opt/fsl-imx-wayland/5.10-hardknott/environment-setup-cortexa53-crypto-poky-linux Generate config file. make imx_v8_defconfig Compile the device tree. make freescale/imx8mm-evk-8mic-revE.dtb Copy the .dtb file to the EVK, for example with scp: scp imx8mm-evk-8mic-revE.dtb root@192.168.100.105:/home/root Led driver.   Obtain the leds-pca995x.h file in the next site: https://github.com/TechNexion/linux-tn-imx/blob/tn-imx_5.4.70_2.3.0-stable/include/linux/platform_data/leds-pca995x.h  Copy it into the next path: cp leds-pca995x.h ~/linux-imx/include/linux Create a new directory. mkdir ~/linux-imx/PCA9955 Create a makefile. cd ~/linux-imx/PCA9955 vim Makefile   KERNEL_ROOT?=~/linux-imx obj-m += leds-pca995x.o all: make -C $(KERNEL_ROOT) M=$(PWD) modules clean: make -C $(KERNEL_ROOT) M=$(PWD) clean   Press the key "Esc" and then: :wq Obtain the leds-pca995x.c file in the next site: https://github.com/TechNexion/linux-tn-imx/blob/tn-imx_5.4.70_2.3.0-stable/drivers/leds/leds-pca995x.c Copy it into the next path: cp leds-pca995x.c ~/linux-imx/PCA9955 Obtain 0001-PCA9955BTW.patch file and copy it into the next path: cp 0001-PCA9955BTW.patch ~/linux-imx/PCA9955 Apply the patch. patch < 0001-PCA9955BTW.patch Then setup your toolchain, for example: source /opt/fsl-imx-wayland/5.10-hardknott/environment-setup-cortexa53-crypto-poky-linux Generate .ko file. cd ~/linux-imx/PCA9955 make all Copy the .ko file to the EVK, for example with scp: scp leds-pca995x.ko root@192.168.100.105:/home/root NOTE: The linux version of .ko file must be the same as EVK. On the EVK. Change the device tree.   Create a directory. mkdir Partition_1 Mount the partition one. mount /dev/mmcblk1p1 Partition_1/ Copy or move the device tree into partition one. cp imx8mm-evk-8mic-revE.dtb Partition_1/ Reboot the board. reboot Stop on u-boot and modify the .dtb file to use the device tree for 8mic board. u-boot=> editenv fdtfile edit: imx8mm-evk-8mic-revE.dtb u-boot=> saveenv Saving Environment to MMC... Writing to MMC(1)... OK u-boot=> boot Install a led driver.   Execute the following command. insmod leds-pca995x.ko And you will see something like: [ 249.359103] leds_pca995x: loading out-of-tree module taints kernel. [ 249.366864] ALL [ 249.368740] ALL 0 [ 249.370667] ALL 1 [ 249.372609] ALL 2 [ 249.374536] ALL 2 [ 249.376475] ALL 2 [ 249.378401] ALL 2 [ 249.380338] ALL 2 [ 249.382264] ALL 2 [ 249.384202] ALL 2 [ 249.386127] ALL 2 [ 249.388063] ALL 2 [ 249.389989] ALL 2 [ 249.391913] ALL 2 [ 249.393847] ALL 2 [ 249.395774] ALL 2 [ 249.397709] ALL 2 [ 249.399635] ALL 2 [ 249.401568] ALL 2 [ 249.403496] ALL 3 Turn on a Led.   If you changed the device tree, you can turn on a led with the following command: echo 250 > /sys/class/leds/pca995x\:blue0/brightness To turn off a led: echo 0 > /sys/class/leds/pca995x\:blue0/brightness Test the push buttons.   If you changed the device tree, you can test the push buttons with the following command: evtest Select the correct number: No device specified, trying to scan all of /dev/input/event* Available devices: /dev/input/event0: 30370000.snvs:snvs-powerkey /dev/input/event1: sw_keys /dev/input/event2: gpio_ir_recv Select the device event number [0-2]: 1 And you will see: Input driver version is 1.0.1 Input device ID: bus 0x19 vendor 0x1 product 0x1 version 0x100 Input device name: "sw_keys" Supported events: Event type 0 (EV_SYN) Event type 1 (EV_KEY) Event code 67 (KEY_F9) Event code 113 (KEY_MUTE) Event code 114 (KEY_VOLUMEDOWN) Event code 115 (KEY_VOLUMEUP) Properties: Testing ... (interrupt to exit) Event: time 1642457988.1642457988, type 1 (EV_KEY), code 114 (KEY_VOLUMEDOWN), value 1 Event: time 1642457988.1642457988, -------------- SYN_REPORT ------------ Event: time 1642457988.1642457988, type 1 (EV_KEY), code 114 (KEY_VOLUMEDOWN), value 0 Event: time 1642457988.1642457988, -------------- SYN_REPORT ------------ Useful information about push buttons.   Physical level.            When there is a change of voltage level on P0-P7 pins, PCA9555PW will generate interrupt on INT pin. The driver (running on SoC) can read the status of P0-P7 pins via I2C (SCL/SDA pins) and generate separate interrupts for each of P0-P7 pins. This is why this driver acts as interrupt controller . Consider next configuration:          One push button changes level on P4 pin, tempting PCA9555PW to generate interrupt. Interrupt from PCA9555PW is connected to GPIO5 IP-core (inside of SoC), and it uses line #9 of that GPIO5 module to notify CPU about interrupt. So we can say that PCA9555PW is cascaded to GPIO5 controller. GPIO5 also acts as interrupt controller, and it's cascaded to GIC interrupt controller.   Device tree.   The meaning of properties is as follows: interrupt-controller  property defines that device generates interrupts; it will be needed further to use this node as interrupt-parent in each push button node. #interrupt-cells defines format of interrupts property; in our case it's 2 : 1 cell for line number and 1 cell for interrupt type interrupt-parent and interrupts properties are describing interrupt line connection   Software level.   CPU now is in interrupt context in GIC interrupt handler. From gic_handle_irq() it calls handle_domain_irq() , which in turn calls generic_handle_irq() . See Documentation/gpio/driver.txt for details. Now we are in SoC's GPIO controller IRQ handler. SoC's GPIO driver also calls generic_handle_irq() to run handler, which is set for each particular pin. See for example how it's done in omap_gpio_irq_handler() . Now we are in PCA9555PW IRQ handler. PCA9555PW IRQ handler calls handle_nested_irq() . Finally, gpio_keys_gpio_isr() is called.
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In some cases, such as OTA, need a complete reset/reboot of the i.MX8/i.MX8X. Current BSP default design for  i.MX8/i.MX8X is partition reset/reboot. So even using spl bootloader(flash.bin). The scfw is still running old version. Not the upgrade version as expected. Because the reset/reboot by the u-boot or Linux, Only reset/reboot the A Core partition. SCU is not reset. Need to change to the board reset, which will launch entire reset/reboot of the i.MX8/i.MX8X including SCU.
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We will build a remote debug environmet of Qt Creator in this user guide.   Contents 1 Change local.conf file in Yocto 2 2 Build and deploy Yocto SDK 2 2.1 Build full image SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.2 Deploy SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Configure QT Kit 2 3.1 Setup device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.2 Configure QT version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.3 Configure gcc and g++ manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.4 Configure gdb manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.5 Configure Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.6 Very important thing!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4 Test result
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Case Description There is requirement need to control(enable/disable) regulator from user space. Regulator userspace-consumer driver can help. But it doesn’t support device tree. A patch for handling device tree is needed. linux/drivers/regulator/userspace-consumer.c    
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  Just sharing some experiences during the development and studying.   Although, it appears some hardwares, it focuses on software to speed up your developing on your  hardware.     杂记共享一下在开发和学习过程中的经验。    虽然涉及一些硬件,但其本身关注软件,希望这些能加速您在自己硬件上的开发。     12/23/2021 i.MX8 i.MX8X Board Reset https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8-i-MX8X-Board-Reset/ta-p/1391130       12/21/2021 regulator userspace-consumer https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/regulator-userspace-consumer/ta-p/1389948     11/24/2021 crypto af_alg blackkey demo crypto af_alg blackkey demo - NXP Community   09/28/2021 u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) - NXP Community     08/17/2021 gpio-poweroff demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/gpio-poweroff-demo/ta-p/1324306         08/04/2021 How to use gpio-hog demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/How-to-use-gpio-hog-demo/ta-p/1317709       07/14/2021 SWUpdate OTA i.MX8MM EVK / i.MX8QXP MEK https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/SWUpdate-OTA-i-MX8MM-EVK-i-MX8QXP-MEK/ta-p/1307416     04/07/2021 i.MX8QXP eMMC Secondary Boot https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/i-MX8QXP-eMMC-Secondary-Boot/ba-p/1257704#M45       03/25/2021 sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition from A core side sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition fr... - NXP Community     03/17/2021 How to Changei.MX8X MEK+Base Board  Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8X-MEK-Base-Board-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1246779#M43     03/16/2021 How to Change i.MX8MM evk Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8MM-evk-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1243938#M40       05/06/2020 Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's environment variables Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's env... - NXP Community     03/30/2020 i.MX6 DDR calibration/stress for Mass Production https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-346065     03/25/2020 parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345998     02/17/2020 Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground      01/15/2020 How to add  iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup How to add iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup    01/09/2020 Understand iMX8QX Hardware Partitioning By Making M4 Hello world Running Correctly https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345359   09/29/2019 Docker On i.MX6UL With Ubuntu16.04 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344462   09/25/2019 Docker On i.MX8MM With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344473 Docker On i.MX8QXP With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344474     08/28/2019 eMMC5.0 vs eMMC5.1 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344265     05/24/2019 How to upgrade  Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU How to upgrade Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU     04/12/2019 eMMC RPMB Enhance and GP https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343116   04/04/2019 How to Dump a GPT SDCard Mirror(Android O SDCard Mirror) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343079   04/04/2019 i.MX Create Android SDCard Mirror https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343078   04/02/2019: i.MX Linux Binary_Demo Files Tips  https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343075   04/02/2019:       Update Set fast boot        eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf   02/28/2019: imx_builder --- standalone build without Yocto https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-342702   08/10/2018: i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG update    Update slide CMA Arrangement Consideration i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_08102018.pdf   07/26/2018 Understand ML With Simplest Code https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341099     04/23/2018:     i.MX8M Standalone Build     i.MX8M Standalone Build.pdf     04/13/2018:      i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG  update            Add slide CMA Arrangement  Consideration     i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_04132018.pdf   09/05/2017:       Update eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 09/01/2017:       eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 08/30/2017:     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display(For i.MX6DQ/DLS)     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display.pdf 08/27/2017:  L3.14.28 Ottbox Porting Notes:         L3.14.28_Ottbox_Porting_Notes-20150805-2.pdf MFGTool Uboot Share With the Normal Run One:        MFGTool_Uboot_share_with_NormalRun_sourceCode.pdf Mass Production with programmer        Mass_Production_with_NAND_programmer.pdf        Mass_Production_with_emmc_programmer.pdf AndroidSDCARDMirrorCreator https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-329596 L3.10.53 PianoPI Porting Note        L3.10.53_PianoPI_PortingNote_151102.pdf Audio Codec WM8960 Porting L3.10.53 PianoPI        AudioCodec_WM8960_Porting_L3.10.53_PianoPI_151012.pdf TouchScreen PianoPI Porting Note         TouchScreen_PianoPI_PortingNote_151103.pdf Accessing GPIO From UserSpace        Accessing_GPIO_From_UserSpace.pdf        https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343344 FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX        FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX.pdf i.MX6SX M4 fastup        i.MX6SX M4 fastup.pdf i.MX6 SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo        i.MX6_SDCARD_Secondary_Boot_Demo.pdf i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG        i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_10082016.pdf Security        Security03172017.pdf    NOT related to i.MX, only a short memo
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    The meta layer is designed for those guys who want to use i.MX8M series SOC and Yocto system to develop AGV and Robot.    The platform includes some key components: 1, ROS1 (kinetic, melodic) and ROS2(dashing, eloquent, foxy) 2, Real-time Linux solution : Xenomai 3.1 with ipipe 5.4.47 patch 3, Industrial protocol : libmodbus, linuxptp, ros-canopen, EtherCAT(TBD) 4, Security: Enhanced OpenSSL, Enhanced GmSSL, Enhanced eCryptfs, secure key store, secure boot(TBD), SE-Linux(TBD),  Dm-verity(TBD) The first release bases on i.MX Yocto release L5.4.47 2.2.0 and You need download Linux 5.4.47_2.2.0 according to​​ https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/IMX_YOCTO_PROJECT_USERS_GUIDE.pdf  firstly. And then you can follow the below guide to build and test ROS and Xenomai. A, clone meta-robot-platform from gitee.com git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v0.1-L5.4.47-2.2.0 B, Adding the meta-robot-platform layer to your build 1,  copy meta-robot-platform into <i.MX Yocto folder>/source 2, You should create a symbol link: setup-imx-robot.sh -> sources/meta-robot-platform/imx/meta-robot/tools/setup-imx-robot.sh C, How to build Robot image (example for i.MX8MQ EVK board) $ DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mqevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r kinetic -b imx8mqevk-robot-kinetic [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mqevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r melodic -b imx8mqevk-robot-melodic ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mqevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r dashing -b imx8mqevk-robot-dashing ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mqevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r eloquent -b imx8mqevk-robot-eloquent ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mqevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r foxy -b imx8mqevk-robot-foxy ] $ bitbake imx-robot-core [or bitbake imx-robot-system ] [or bitbake imx-robot-sdk ] And if you add XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" in local.conf, you also can build real-time image with Xenomai by the below command: $ bitbake imx-robot-core-rt [or bitbake imx-robot-system-rt ] D, Robot image sanity testing //ROS1 Sanity Test #source /opt/ros/kinetic/setup.sh [or # source /opt/ros/melodic/setup.sh ] #echo $LD_LIBRARY_PATH #roscore & #rosnode list #rostopic list #only kinetic #rosmsg list #rosnode info /rosout //ROS2 Sanity Test #source ros_setup.sh #echo $LD_LIBRARY_PATH #ros2 topic list #ros2 msg list #only dashing #ros2 interface list #(sleep 5; ros2 topic pub /chatter std_msgs/String "data: Hello world") & #ros2 topic echo /chatter E, Xenomai sanity testing #/usr/xenomai/demo/cyclictest -p 50 -t 5 -m -n -i 1000 F, vSLAM demo You can find orb-slam2 demo under <i.MX Yocto folder>/sources/meta-robot-platform/imx/meta-robot/recipes-demo/orb-slam2. You should choose DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland due to it depends on OpenCV with gtk+.   //////////////////////////////////////// update for Yocto L5.4.70 2.3.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release package meta-robot-platform-v0.2-L5.4.70-2.3.0 for Yocto release L5.4.70 2.3.0 and it supports i.MX8M series (8MQ,8MM,8MN and 8MP) and i.MX8QM/QXP.  git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v0.2-L5.4.70-2.3.0 Updating: 1, Support i.MX8QM and i.MX8QXP 2, Add ROS driver of RPLIDAR and Orbbec 3D cameras in ROS1 3, Upgrade OpenCV to 3.4.13. 4, Add imx-robot-agv image with orb-slam2 demo 5, Fix the issue which failed to create image when adding orb-slam2 6, Fix the issue which failed to create imx-robot sdk image when add package ISP and ML Note: Currently, orb-slam2 demo don't run on i.MX8MM platform due to its GPU don't support OpenGL ES3. imx-robot-sdk image is just for building ROS package on i.MX board, not  for cross-compile. You can try "bitbake imx-robot-system -c populate_sdk" to create cross-compile sdk without gmssl-bin. diff --git a/imx/meta-robot/recipes-core/images/imx-robot-system.bb b/imx/meta-robot/recipes-core/images/imx-robot-system.bb index 1991ab10..68f9ad31 100644 --- a/imx/meta-robot/recipes-core/images/imx-robot-system.bb +++ b/imx/meta-robot/recipes-core/images/imx-robot-system.bb @@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ CORE_IMAGE_EXTRA_INSTALL += " \ ${@bb.utils.contains('DISTRO_FEATURES', 'x11 wayland', 'weston-xwayland xterm', '', d)} \ ${ISP_PKGS} \ " -IMAGE_INSTALL += " clblast openblas libeigen opencv gmssl-bin" +IMAGE_INSTALL += " clblast openblas libeigen opencv" IMAGE_INSTALL += " \ ${ML_PKGS} \   //////////////////////////////////////// update for Yocto L5.4.70 2.3.2  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release package meta-robot-platform-v0.3-L5.4.70-2.3.2 for Yocto release L5.4.70 2.3.2 .  git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v0.3-L5.4.70-2.3.2 Updated: 1, Upgrade to L5.4.70-2.3.2 2, Enable xenomai rtdm driver 3, Add NXP Software Content Register and BSP patches of i.MX8M Plus AI Robot board. Note: How to build for AI Robot board 1, DISTRO=imx-robot-wayland MACHINE=imx8mp-ddr4-ipc source setup-imx-robot.sh -r melodic -b imx8mp-ddr4-ipc-robot-melodic 2, Add BBLAYERS += " ${BSPDIR}/sources/meta-robot-platform/imx/meta-imx8mp-ai-robot " in bblayers.conf 3, bitbake imx-robot-sdk or bitbake imx-robot-agv   //////////////////////////////////////// update for v1.0-L5.4.70-2.3.2  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release package meta-robot-platform-v1.0-L5.4.70-2.3.2 .  git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v1.0-L5.4.70-2.3.2 Updated: 1, Upgrade ROS1 Kinetic Kame to Release 2021-05-11 which is final sync. 2, Add IgH EtherCAT Master for Linux in i.MX Robot platform. //////////////////////////////////////// update for v1.1-L5.4.70-2.3.2  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release package meta-robot-platform-v1.1-L5.4.70-2.3.2 .  git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v1.1-L5.4.70-2.3.2 Updated: 1, Add more packages passed building in ROS1 Kinetic Kame. 2, Change the board name (From IPC to AI-Robot) in Uboot and kernel for i.MX8M Plus AI Robot board. You can use the below setup command to build ROS image for AI Robot board: DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mp-ai-robot source setup-imx-robot.sh -r kinetic -b imx8mp-ai-robot-robot-kinetic DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mp-ai-robot source setup-imx-robot.sh -r melodic -b imx8mp-ai-robot-robot-melodic DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mp-ai-robot source setup-imx-robot.sh -r dashing -b imx8mp-ai-robot-robot-dashing DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mp-ai-robot source setup-imx-robot.sh -r eloquent -b imx8mp-ai-robot-robot-eloquent DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mp-ai-robot source setup-imx-robot.sh -r foxy -b imx8mp-ai-robot-robot-foxy BTW, you should add BBLAYERS += " ${BSPDIR}/sources/meta-robot-platform/imx/meta-imx8mp-ai-robot " in conf/bblayers.conf.   //////////////////////////////////////// update for v1.2-L5.4.70-2.3.3  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release package meta-robot-platform-v1.2-L5.4.70-2.3.3 .  git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v1.2-L5.4.70-2.3.3 Updated: 1, Update to Yocto release L5.4.70-2.3.3 2, Enable RTNet FEC driver, test on i.MX8M Mini EVK and i.MX8M Plus EVK. For the detailed information,  Please refer to the community post 移植实时Linux方案Xenomai到i.MX ARM64平台 (Enable Xenomai on i.MX ARM64 Platform)    //////////////////////////////////////// update for v2.1-L5.10.52-2.1.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release package meta-robot-platform-v2.1-L5.10.52-2.1.0 .  git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/meta-robot-platform.git git checkout v2.1.1-L5.10.52-2.1.0 Updated: 1, Update to Yocto release L5.10.52-2.1.0 2, Add ROS1 noetic, ROS2 galactic and rolling 3, Upgrade Xenomai to v3.2 4, Add vSLAM demo orb-slam3 5, Upgrade OpenCV to 3.4.15 for ROS1 A, Adding the meta-robot-platform layer to your build 1,  copy meta-robot-platform into <i.MX Yocto folder>/source 2, You should create a symbol link: setup-imx-robot.sh -> sources/meta-robot-platform/imx/meta-robot/tools/setup-imx-robot.sh B, How to build Robot image (example for i.MX8M Plus EVK board) $ DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r kinetic -b imx8mpevk-robot-kinetic [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r melodic -b imx8mpevk-robot-melodic ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r noetic-b imx8mpevk-robot-noetic] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r dashing -b imx8mpevk-robot-dashing ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r eloquent -b imx8mpevk-robot-eloquent ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r foxy -b imx8mpevk-robot-foxy ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r galactic -b imx8mpevk-robot-galactic ] [or DISTRO=imx-robot-xwayland MACHINE=imx8mpevk source setup-imx-robot.sh -r rolling -b imx8mpevk-robot-rolling ] $ bitbake imx-robot-agv [or bitbake imx-robot-cor ] [or bitbake imx-robot-system ] [or bitbake imx-robot-sdk ]
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  1.overwrite  the sources/meta-freescale/recipes-security/optee-imx with optee-imx.zip 2.add below code to conf/local.conf DISTRO_FEATURES_append += " systemd" DISTRO_FEATURES_BACKFILL_CONSIDERED += "sysvinit" VIRTUAL-RUNTIME_init_manager = "systemd" VIRTUAL-RUNTIME_initscripts = "systemd-compat-units" MACHINE_FEATURES_append += "optee" DISTRO_FEATURES_append += "optee" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += "optee-test optee-os optee-client optee-examples" 3.bitbake optee-examples or bitbake imx-image-xxx You can directly install optee-examples_3.11.0-r0_arm64.deb in your device.  
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SWUpdate: Embedded Systems become more and more complex. Software for Embedded Systems have new features and fixes can be updated in a reliable way. Most of time, we need OTA(Over-The-Air) to upgrade the system. Like Android has its own update system. Linux also need an update system. SWUpdate project is thought to help to update an embedded system from a storage media or from network. However, it should be mainly considered as a framework, where further protocols or installers (in SWUpdate they are called handlers) can be easily added to the application. Mongoose daemon mode: Mongoose is a daemon mode of SWUpdate that provides a web server, web interface and web application. Mongoose is running on the target board(i.MX8MM EVK/i.MX8QXP MEK).Using Web browser to access it.   Suricatta daemon mode: Suricatta regularly polls a remote server for updates, downloads, and installs them. Thereafter, it reboots the system and reports the update status to the server. The screenshot is SWUpdate scuricatta working with hawkbit server.          
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i.MX_Android_FAQ i.MX Android FAQ 1 Sync project and Build 1.1 How can I download AOSP repo from mirror server? By default, all aosp repo in the Android project will be downloaded from google server directly. But some may have issues to access the google server, if you have server which has mirrored the aosp repo then you can redirct the aosp repo download link. In i.MX android project, all aosp repo will be included in the ${MY_ANDROID}/.repo/manifests/aosp*.xml, you can redirect the aosp repo remote by changing the "fetch" for remote "aosp", below is an example to redirect the remote link to <your-mirror-server-address>: @@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ <manifest> <remote name="aosp" - fetch="https://android.googlesource.com/" + fetch="<your-mirror-server-address>/" review="https://android-review.googlesource.com/" /> <default revision="refs/tags/android-10.0.0_r32" remote="aosp" 1.2 How do I configure the build information? BUILD_ID and BUILD_NUMBER are two makefile variables that can be used in Android core build system to specify build information if they are defined. In our release package, we define the BUILD_ID as the internal release build number, and define the BUILD_NUMBER as the internal release date. You can customize the value of these two variables in the file of ${MY_ANDROID}/device/fsl/{product}/build_id.mk. "${MY_ANDROID}" represents a the root directory of Android source code. "{product}" is related to specific chips and boards, for example, it can be "imx8m/evk_8mq". Below is an example to update the BUILD_ID for i.MX 8MQuad EVK diff --git a/imx8m/evk_8mq/build_id.mk b/imx8m/evk_8mq/build_id.mk index 257b500..b177202 100644 --- a/imx8m/evk_8mq/build_id.mk +++ b/imx8m/evk_8mq/build_id.mk @@ -18,5 +18,5 @@ # (like "CRB01"). It must be a single word, and is # capitalized by convention. -export BUILD_ID=1.0.0-ga-rc2 +export BUILD_ID=1.0.0-ga-rc3 export BUILD_NUMBER=20190114 1.3 How do I change boot command line in boot.img? After using boot.img, we stored the default kernel boot command line inside of this image. It will package together during android build. You can change this by changing BOARD_KERNEL_CMDLINE's definition in ${MY_ANDROID}/device/fsl/{product}/BoardConfig.mk file. NOTE: Replace {product} with your product, eg, imx8m/evk_8mq. 1.4 How to fix Python2 incompatible with latest git-repo? You might meet below exception when you execute "repo init" or "repo sync": haoran@pentakill:~/ssd/imx_5.4.y$ repo sync -c repo: warning: Python 2 is no longer supported; Please upgrade to Python 3.6+. Traceback (most recent call last): File "/home/ssd-1/haoran/imx_5.4.y/.repo/repo/main.py", line 56, in <module> from subcmds.version import Version File "/home/ssd-1/haoran/imx_5.4.y/.repo/repo/subcmds/__init__.py", line 38, in <module> ['%s' % name]) File "/home/ssd-1/haoran/imx_5.4.y/.repo/repo/subcmds/upload.py", line 27, in <module> from hooks import RepoHook File "/home/ssd-1/haoran/imx_5.4.y/.repo/repo/hooks.py", line 472 file=sys.stderr) ^ In Android repository, the "repo" tool which used to work actually is from ${MY_ANDROID}/.repo/repo/repo. This Python script is from Google's  https://gerrit.googlesource.com/git-repo  by default. Google pushed the change for this git-repo.git and removed the Python2 support of the repo tool after Dec 2020. So the Python2 cannot execute the repo sub command any more based on latest repo tools.  For older Android release, some build scripts of Android cannot support Python 3. So that it is not convenient to switch Python tool always between "repo sync" and images builts. A way to reslove this is that we can follow below instructions to fallback your git-repo version which work for Python 2 for older Android releases:   $cd ${MY_ANDROID}/.repo/repo $git checkout -b python2_repo 58ac1678e8438fd029a22365741fc57276eda404 $git branch python2_repo --set-upstream-to=origin/master 2 Connectivity 2.1 How do I setup a computer to support ADB? To setup a computer to support ADB, see   Android web site   for more details. There is one thing not clear in the page mentioned above about "setup the system to detect the device" on Ubuntu Linux, an udev rules file need to be created and well edited, please follow below steps:     1. Create the file of "/etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules" with root permission and add the vendors of the device to the file with below format SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="18d1", MODE="0666", GROUP="plugdev" SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1fc9", MODE="0666", GROUP="plugdev" the id value of "18d1" is USB VID of google, which is used in our USB HAL code. the id value of "1fc9" is the USB VID of NXP.     2. now execute blow command on the host chmod a+r /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules 2.2 How do I setup a computer to support ADB In Recovery mode? NXP i.MX 6/7 series support applying system update from ADB's. Linux OS supports this feature by default. For Windows OS, follow the steps below: Install the Google usb driver. Apply the patch below to the USB driver from Google. Connect the USB cable to the board and install the driver according to the instructions provided. --- android_winusb.inf 2013-06-04 13:39:40.344756457 +0800 +++ android_winusb.inf 2013-06-04 13:43:46.634756423 +0800 @@ -23,6 +23,8 @@ [Google.NTx86] +;adb sideload support +%SingleAdbInterface% = USB_Install, USB\VID_18D1&PID_D001 ;Google Nexus One %SingleAdbInterface% = USB_Install, USB\VID_18D1&PID_0D02 @@ -59,7 +61,8 @@ [Google.NTamd64] - +;adb sideload support +%SingleAdbInterface% = USB_Install, USB\VID_18D1&PID_D001 ;Google Nexus One %SingleAdbInterface% = USB_Install, USB\VID_18D1&PID_0D02 %CompositeAdbInterface% = USB_Install, USB\VID_18D1&PID_0D02&MI_01 2.3 How do I enable USB tethering? We support the USB tethering feature, and upstream device can be WIFI or Ethernet. USB tethering can be enabled in the Settings UI after your OTG USB cable is connected to PC: Settings -> Network & internet -> Hotspot & tethering -> USB tethering. On linux and Windows 7 PC, when USB tethering is enabled, you can easily get a usb network device with host driver installed automatically. The IP and DNS server is automatically configured. On Windows XP PC, when you have connected the board with the PC and you can see an unknown device named "Android" in the device manager, you have to manually install the tethering driver file of tetherxp.inf. After it is successfully installed, you can see "Android USB RNDIS device" in the device manager. By this time, you can use USB rndis network device to access the network. 2.4 How do I use MTP? The Media Transfer Protocol is a set of custom extensions to the   Picture Transfer Protocol   (PTP). Whereas PTP was designed for downloading photographs from digital cameras, Media Transfer Protocol supports the transfer of music files on digital audio players and media files on portable media players, as well as personal information on   personal digital assistants. Starting with version 4.0, Android supports MTP as default protocol transfer files with PC, instead of the USB Mass Storage. By default, as Google suggested, we disabled the UMS and enabled MTP. NOTE: Please make sure you disable the USB Tethering when using MTP. Under WinXP, you can not make MTP work with ADB enabled, but under Win7, MTP can work together with ADB in most of the cases. When connecting the board to PC by USB cable, a USB icon will be shown in the notification bar. Then you can click on the notification area, and select "Connected as a media device" to launch the USB computer connection option UI. There, MTP and PTP can be chosen as current transfer protocol. You can also launch the option UI by Settings -> Storage -> MENU -> USB computer connection. MTP on Windows XP Windows XP supports PTP protocol by default. In order to support MTP protocol, you must install Windows Media Player (Version >= 10). When connecting to the PC, you can see MTP devices in windows explorer. Since Windows XP only supports copy/paste files in the explorer, you cannot directly open the files in MTP device. MTP on Windows 7 Windows 7 supports MTP(PTP) protocol by default. When connecting to the PC, you can see MTP devices in windows explorer. You can do any operations just as you would on your hard disk. MTP on ubuntu Ubuntu supports PTP protocol by default. To support MTP protocol, you must install the following packages: libmtp, mtp-tools by $ sudo apt-get install mtp-tools If your default libmtp version is not 1.1.1 (current latest libmtp on ubuntu is 1.1.0), you must upgrade it manually by: $ sudo apt-get install libusb-dev $ wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/project/libmtp/libmtp/1.1.1/libmtp-1.1.1.tar.gz $ tar -xvf libmtp-1.1.1.tar.gz $ cd libmtp-1.1.1 $ ./configure --prefix=/usr $ make -j4 $ sudo make install After you have done the steps outlined above, you can transfer the files between PC and Device by the following commands: mtp-detect: find current connected MTP device mtp-files: list all the files on MTP device 2.5 How do I set networking proxy for Wi-Fi? To configure the proxy settings for a Wi-Fi network, you have to: Tap and hold a network from the list of added Wi-Fi networks Now choose "Advanced options", and scroll down to "Proxy". Choose "Manually". Then enter the proxy settings provided by the network administrator. Finally tap on the button denoted as "CONNECT". 2.6 How to adapt the "wifi country code" for a specific country and/or region? In i.MX Android Software, "CN" is used as default code while it's mainly for mainland of China. Some other countries and/or regions are listed in below table for convenience. If the target country/region is not in below table,  Search on the internet with the keyword of "ISO 3166" for the result. Code Country/Region name CA Canada JP Japan DE Germany NL Netherlands IT Italy PT Portugal LU Luxembourg NO Norway FI Finland DK Denmark CH Switzerland CZ Czech Republic ES Spain GB United Kingdom KR Republic of Korea (South Korea) FR France SG Singapore BR Brazil IL Israel AT Austria AU Australia BE Belgium CY Cyprus EE Estonia GR Greece HU Hungary ID Indonesia IE Ireland ID India IS Iceland LT Lithuania LV Latvia MY Malaysia NZ New Zealand PH Philippines PL Poland SE Sweden SI Slovenia SK Slovak Republic TH Thailand US United States ZA South Africa   2.7 How to switch the Power role of USB Power Delivery through USB Type-C? Several i.MX 8 board support the USB Power Delivery(PD) through USB Type-C port.The board can be acted as Power Sink or Power Source. Check corresponding Android Release Notes to see whether board support USB Power Delivery(PD) or not. Below are the steps to switch the Power role: 1.Connect a reference device with i.MX board: Use a Type-C to Type-C cable to connect i.MX board with the reference device(support Usb Power Delivery). 2.Check i.MX board device's role If i.MX board connects as host , and the reference device is a device(has a usb Drop-down menu to choose transfer files, ptp), then do step 3 on the reference device. If i.MX board connects as device(has a usb Drop-down menu to choose transfer files, ptp), and the reference device is a host, then do step 3 on i.MX board. 3.Power role switch If i.MX board is host: To make i.MX board as Power Source to charge the reference device, choose "Charging this device" on the reference device's usb Drop-down menu. To make i.MX board as Power Sink to be charged by the reference device, choose "Supplying power" on the reference device's usb Drop-down menu. If i.MX board is device: To make i.MX board as Power Source to charge the reference device, choose "Supplying power" on i.MX board's usb Drop-down menu. To make i.MX board as Power Sink to be charged by the reference device,choose "Charging this device" on i.MX board's usb Drop-down menu. NOTE: 1.Below command can check current power role for the i.MX board cat /sys/class/typec/port0/power_role source [sink] : means this i.MX board is been charged by the reference device, [source] sink : means this i.MX board is charging the reference device, 2.The reference device should support the USB Power Delivery(PD). You can check whether the reference device support it or not by below command when it is connected with i.MX board's USB Type-C port: cat /sys/class/typec/port0/port0-partner/supports_usb_power_delivery, If this value is yes, then this reference device supports usb power delivery. Google pixel phone meets this requirement, but Google nexus 6 does not. 3 Core 3.1 How do I enter Android Recovery mode manually? When the system is running, press "VOLUME DOWN" and "Power" to enter Recovery mode if board has these keys. This check is in u-boot.git board support file, where you can change your preferred combo keys. Also, you can input this command in the console: reboot recovery # the board reset to recovery mode. to enter recovery mode. 3.2 How do I enter the text menu in recovery mode? NOTE: This function only works on boards with POWER / VOLUME UP / VOLUME DOWN keys. When the system completes booted up into recovery mode, you will see an Android Robot Logo Press the   POWER KEY(keep pressed),   and then   VOLUME UP KEY   going to the   text menu   like this: Move the menu item by   VOLUME UP   and   VOLUME DOWN   button. Select the menu item by   Power Key. Select the required option using the direction keys on the keypad or keyboard. reboot system now apply update from ADB, you may update the software from update.zip by adb sideload command. Only NXP i.MX 6/7 series support this feature. wipe data/factory reset. /data and /cache partitions are formatted. wipe cache partition. /cache partition is formatted. Reboot the system. 3.3 How do I upgrade system by ADB? NXP i.MX 6/7 series support applying system update from ADB. Before upgrade the system with ADB tool, please install adb driver first, see "2 Connectivity->2.2 How do I setup a computer to support ADB In Recovery mode?" section. After the installation and setup of the driver is complete, follow the steps below: Download the OTA update package to your computer, and connect the board to your PC with USB cable. Ensure that the system has entered recovery mode. See "3.1 How do I enter Android Recovery mode manually" section. Toggle the text Menu, move the cursor to "apply update from ADB", the UI is displayed as follows: On your computer, execute below command adb sideload $YOUR_UPDATE_PACKAGE.zip After the package is sent, the system starts updating the firmware with the update file. 3.4 How do I use android fastboot? Fastboot is an utility which can be used to download images from Windows/Linux PC to the target storage device. This utility is released by Google, which can be downloaded from Android official site. Android release implements part of the fastboot commands in the U-Boot, such as: flash, reboot, getvar. Before using the fastboot, Google usb driver should be installed on windows HOST and the target board should boot up to bootloader fastboot mode. NOTE: the size of images downloaded by fastboot must be less than the related partition size. Target side: Power on the board with USB OTG connected. Make sure board enter fastboot mode. There are several ways to enter fastboot mode. Option1: Input   reboot bootloader   in console after boot. Option2: Connect power to the board. You'll see the following output from the console. U-Boot ... ... Fastboot: Normal Hit any key to stop autoboot: 3 Hit   any key   before the countdown completes to access the bootloader prompt. Type fastboot usb and hit Enter: Fastboot: Normal Hit any key to stop autoboot: 0 => fastboot usb NOTE: 1.On HOST PC, it will prompt you that a new device was found and that you need to install the driver. Please install it. 2.After board enter U-Boot mode, type mmc part on target side to get detail partition name defined in partition table image. Some partitions are hardcoded in u-boot, it will not be listed here. Host side: Make sure fastboot is contained by the system environment variable of "PATH". Go to image folder. Below is an example to use fastboot to flash images for NXP imx8 series. Make sure your board is in unlock state before flashing images with fastboot. bootloader0/bootloader and gpt partitions is hardcoded in u-boot, it's not in partition table file. names and number of partitions defined in partition table file may change as time goes on and new features are enabled. $ fastboot flash gpt partition-table.img $ fastboot flash bootloader0 u-boot.imx $ fastboot flash dtbo dtbo.img $ fastboot flash boot boot.img $ fastboot flash system system.img $ fastboot flash vendor vendor.img $ fastboot flash vbmeta vbmeta.img $ fastboot reboot Below is an example to use fastboot to flash images for NXP i.MX 6/7 series. $ fastboot flash gpt partition-table.img $ fastboot flash bootloader u-boot.imx $ fastboot flash dtbo dtbo.img $ fastboot flash boot boot.img $ fastboot flash system system.img $ fastboot flash vendor vendor.img $ fastboot flash vbmeta vbmeta.img $ fastboot flash recovery recovery.img $ fastboot reboot 3.5 How to do incremental OTA update for imx6/7?      3.5.1 Check the definition of "IncrementalOTA_InstallEnd" function i.MX6/7 code released before Android10(not include Android10) does not support to build incremental OTA package. need to define a function named "IncrementalOTA_InstallEnd" in releasetools.py for a specific platform, this is a file under ${MY_ANDROID}/device/fsl. take i.MX 7ULP EVK as an example, this file is ${MY_ANDROID}/device/fsl/imx7ulp/releasetools.py. if the function is not defined, make below changes on the code. Other platforms have their own releasetools.py, modify the file based on you own requirement.                                     diff --git a/imx7ulp/releasetools.py b/imx7ulp/releasetools.py index 8c40905d..d557b23e 100644 --- a/imx7ulp/releasetools.py +++ b/imx7ulp/releasetools.py @@ -38,3 +38,25 @@ def FullOTA_InstallEnd(info): # emit the script code to trigger the dtbo updater on the device info.script.WriteRawImage("/dtbo", "dtbo.img") + +def IncrementalOTA_InstallEnd(info): + # copy the vbmeta and dtbo into the package. + try: + vbmeta_img = common.GetBootableImage( + "vbmeta.img", "vbmeta.img", OPTIONS.input_tmp, "VBMETA") + dtbo_img = common.GetBootableImage( + "dtbo.img", "dtbo.img", OPTIONS.input_tmp, "DTBO") + except KeyError: + print "no vbmeta or dtbo images in target_files; skipping install" + return + # copy the vbmeta into the package. + common.ZipWriteStr(info.output_zip, "vbmeta.img", vbmeta_img.data) + + # emit the script code to trigger the vbmeta updater on the device + info.script.WriteRawImage("/vbmeta", "vbmeta.img") + + # copy the dtbo into the package. + common.ZipWriteStr(info.output_zip, "dtbo.img", dtbo_img.data) + + # emit the script code to trigger the dtbo updater on the device + info.script.WriteRawImage("/dtbo", "dtbo.img")                                     The variable "BOARD_PREBUILT_DTBOIMAGE" in ${MY_ANDROID}/device/fsl  is used to specify the dtbo images to be built into the OTA package. modify the value of this variable based on your requirement. Take i.MX7ULP EVK as an example, you may need to made below change to make the OTA package suitable for boards with MIPI panel display                                     diff --git a/imx7ulp/evk_7ulp/BoardConfig.mk b/imx7ulp/evk_7ulp/BoardConfig.mk index 0c023ecc..ec1c695f 100644 --- a/imx7ulp/evk_7ulp/BoardConfig.mk +++ b/imx7ulp/evk_7ulp/BoardConfig.mk @@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ TARGET_BOARD_DTS_CONFIG := imx7ulp:imx7ulp-evkb.dtb imx7ulp-evk:imx7ulp-evk.dtb TARGET_BOARD_DTS_CONFIG += imx7ulp-mipi:imx7ulp-evkb-rm68200-wxga.dtb imx7ulp-evk-mipi:imx7ulp-evk-mipi.dtb TARGET_KERNEL_DEFCONFIG := imx_v7_android_defconfig # TARGET_KERNEL_ADDITION_DEFCONF := imx_v7_android_addition_defconfig -BOARD_PREBUILT_DTBOIMAGE := out/target/product/evk_7ulp/dtbo-imx7ulp.img +BOARD_PREBUILT_DTBOIMAGE := out/target/product/evk_7ulp/dtbo-imx7ulp-mipi.img # u-boot target used by uuu for imx7ulp_evk TARGET_BOOTLOADER_CONFIG += imx7ulp-evk-uuu:mx7ulp_evk_defconfig                                     3.5.2  Build target package file                You can use below command to generate target package file under android environment: $ cd ${MY_ANDROID} $ source build/envsetup.sh $ lunch evk_7ulp-userdebug $ make target-files-package -j4 After the build finish, you can find target package file in the following path: . ${MY_ANDROID}/out/target/product/evk_7ulp/obj/PACKAGING/target_files_intermediates/evk_7ulp-target_files-**.zip Copy the target file to ${MY_ANDROID} directory, let's rename it as evk_7ulp-target.a.zip. then execute below command to generate the full OTA package. $ ./build/tools/releasetools/ota_from_target_files evk_7ulp-target.a.zip evk_ota_full.zip Apply this OTA package evk_ota_full.zip to the board. for example, with adb, execute below commands on the host which is connected to the board via the USB cable: $ sudo adb root $ sudo adb reboot sideload # wait a while until the system reboot into sideload mode $ sudo adb sideload evk_ota_full.zip After preceding commands finished, the reboot the system. the images running on the board is the same as images in "evk_7ulp-target.a.zip"    3.5.3  Build incremental update package An incremental update contains a set of binary patches to be applied to the data already on the device. This can result in considerably smaller update packages. Incremental OTA package is also build from target package file, the difference with full OTA package is that two target package files are needed to generate on incremental OTA package. one target package has the images already running on the board, one has the image to be updated to. For example, we've update the i.MX 7ULP EVK board with images running on it the same as images in "evk_7ulp-target.a.zip". After this, some development work is done on the code. we can build the target package file again and generate full OTA package just as described in "3.5.2 Build target package file", We can also use this new generated target package file together with evk_7ulp-target.a.zip to generate a incremental OTA package. Assume that we've generated a target file, copied to ${MY_ANDROID} directory and rename it as evk_7ulp-target.b.zip. execute below command on the host to generate incremental OTA package: $ ./build/tools/releasetools/ota_from_target_files -i evk_7ulp-target.a.zip evk_7ulp-target.b.zip evk_7ulp_ota_diff.zip An incremental OTA package is generated with preceding command. it should be applied on device running the same images as in target file evk_7ulp-target.a.zip. This incremental OTA package can also be updated to the board with adb, just as described for full OTA package. After this OTA package is applied. next time if another incremental OTA is needed, a new generated target package file and the old evk_7ulp-target.b.zip is used to generate it. 4 A/V 4.1 How do I check frame drop statistic while video playback? Input below commands from console while video playback to get the real-time frame drop statistics. dumpsys media.player | grep "num" Then check the output,frame drop statistic will be showed like: numFramesTotal(1892), numFramesDropped(0), percentageDropped(0.00%) numFramesTotal: The total frames of the video file. numFramesDropped: The dropped frame count as AV synchronization. percentageDropped: The total dropped frame percentage. 5 Graphics 5.1 How to set GPU Minimal clock to balance performance and power consumption? Normally GPU works at full speed. When thermal driver report chip too hot, the GPU driver will adjust internal clock to reduce the power consumption to cool the chip down quickly. In theory we should set the GPU clock to 1/64 so that chip can be cool down more quickly, but you may see the black screen or flicker issue when GPU work at so slow clock especially in large resolution. There is below way to customize the threshold of GPU minimal clock based the chip and the resolution of their product. Customer can set the minimal GPU clock by change below line in ${MY_ANDROID}/device/fsl/{product}/init.rc file, the value can be set to any value from 1 to 64. write /sys/module/galcore/parameters/gpu3DMinClock 3 Current default value is 3. Customer should tune and set the suitable value based on their test. 5.2 How to disable GPU acceleration? There are three parts using GPU acceleration on android. Customer may need to disable some of them separately to narrow down issue. Below are the steps to do it. 1.Disable HWComposer: You can disable HWComposer in Setting apk, Settings->System-> {} Developer options ->Disable HW overlays 2.Disable OpenGL Renderer You can disable OpenGL Renderer and force use SKIA to draw by set "setprop sys.viewroot.hw false" and kill surfaceflinger thread. 3.Disable OpenGL 3D draw Disable OpenGL 3D draw can only be done after Disable OpenGL Renderer as this operation will totally disable all 3D OpenGL acceleration. You can do it by "mv /system/lib/egl/libGLES_android.so /system/lib/egl/libGLES.so" and kill surfaceflinger thread. NOTE: below example tell you how to kill surfaceflinger root@sabresd_6dq:/ # ps | grep surfaceflinger system 159 1 168148 7828 ffffffff b6f05834 S /system/bin/surfaceflinger root@sabresd_6dq:/ # kill 159 6 Boot 6.1 How to boot form different paritions of eMMC for boards with i.MX 8QuadXPlus b0 chips? i.MX 8QuadXPlus MEK with silicon revision b0 chips can boot from eMMC boot partition 32KB offset, but this is not a behaviour specified in the Reference Manual, it is not guaranteed to work fine on your boards. As the Reference manual shows that the first image container offset is 0 if the bootloader image is in eMMC boot partition or 32KB if the bootloader image is in eMMC User data area partition. If boot from eMMC boot partition 32KB offset does not work on your boards, some changes can be made to comply with the description in the Reference Manual: 1. bootloader image at eMMC boot partition with 0 offset with this scenario, eMMC fast boot mode should be used for i.MX 8QuadXPlus silicon revision b0 chips. eMMC fast boot mode is not enabled by default, and enabling it is irreversible. fastboot command "fuse prog -y 0 0x13 0x1" can be used to enable eMMC fastboot mode, this can be add to the uuu_imx_android_flash scripts. an example on uuu_imx_android_flash.sh: diff --git a/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh b/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh index da45518cb..49ee53555 100755 --- a/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh +++ b/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh @@ -145,6 +145,9 @@ function uuu_load_uboot if [[ ${target_dev} = "emmc" ]]; then echo FB: ucmd mmc partconf ${target_num} 1 1 1 >> /tmp/uuu.lst fi + if [[ ${soc_name} = "imx8qxp" ]] && [[ ${uboot_feature} != *"c0"* ]]; then + echo FB: ucmd fuse prog -y 0 0x13 0x1 >> /tmp/uuu.lst + fi if [[ ${intervene} -eq 1 ]]; then echo FB: done >> /tmp/uuu.lst Also, the "bootloader0" partition offset for i.MX 8QuadXPlus silicon revision b0 should change to 0 from 32K. diff --git a/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c b/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c index 92c978e6c8..7e3679b19a 100644 --- a/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c +++ b/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c @@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ static ulong bootloader_mmc_offset(void) { if (is_imx8mq() || is_imx8mm() || ((is_imx8qm() || is_imx8qxp()) && is_soc_rev(CHIP_REV_A))) return 0x8400; - else if (is_imx8qm() || (is_imx8qxp() && !is_soc_rev(CHIP_REV_B))) { + else if (is_imx8qm() || is_imx8qxp()) { if (MEK_8QM_EMMC == fastboot_devinfo.dev_id) /* target device is eMMC boot0 partition, bootloader offset is 0x0 */ return 0x0; 2. bootloader image at eMMC User data area partition with 32KB offset. with this scenario, code in uboot should be modified to make the "bootloader0" partition in eMMC User data area partiton. Below patch can work for i.MX 8QuadXPlus MEK with b0 chips, but it obviously will impact other platforms, apply below path with caution. diff --git a/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_dev.c b/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_dev.c index f1c116bea2..c23f0a3e01 100644 --- a/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_dev.c +++ b/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_dev.c @@ -124,7 +124,7 @@ static int get_fastboot_target_dev(char *mmc_dev, struct fastboot_ptentry *ptn) printf("Flash target is mmc%d\n", dev); if (target_mmc->part_config != MMCPART_NOAVAILABLE) sprintf(mmc_dev, "mmc dev %x %x", dev, /*slot no*/ - FASTBOOT_MMC_BOOT_PARTITION_ID/*part no*/); + FASTBOOT_MMC_USER_PARTITION_ID/*part no*/); else sprintf(mmc_dev, "mmc dev %x", dev); } @@ -559,4 +559,4 @@ void process_erase_mmc(const char *cmdbuf, char *response) sprintf(response, "OKAY"); return; -} \ No newline at end of file +} diff --git a/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c b/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c index 92c978e6c8..4629060402 100644 --- a/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c +++ b/drivers/fastboot/fb_fsl/fb_fsl_partitions.c @@ -231,7 +231,7 @@ static int _fastboot_parts_load_from_ptable(void) bootloader_mmc_offset() / dev_desc->blksz; ptable[PTN_BOOTLOADER_INDEX].length = ANDROID_BOOTLOADER_SIZE / dev_desc->blksz; - ptable[PTN_BOOTLOADER_INDEX].partition_id = boot_partition; + ptable[PTN_BOOTLOADER_INDEX].partition_id = user_partition; ptable[PTN_BOOTLOADER_INDEX].flags = FASTBOOT_PTENTRY_FLAGS_UNERASEABLE; strcpy(ptable[PTN_BOOTLOADER_INDEX].fstype, "raw"); eMMC also need to be set to boot from User data area partition, set this in uuu_imx_android_flash scripts. An example on uuu_imx_android_flash.sh is as below, note that this will have impact on flashing other platforms, apply it with caution. diff --git a/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh b/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh index da45518cb..d98844d84 100755 --- a/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh +++ b/common/tools/uuu_imx_android_flash.sh @@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ function uuu_load_uboot echo FB: ucmd mmc erase ${uboot_env_start} ${uboot_env_len} >> /tmp/uuu.lst if [[ ${target_dev} = "emmc" ]]; then - echo FB: ucmd mmc partconf ${target_num} 1 1 1 >> /tmp/uuu.lst + echo FB: ucmd mmc partconf ${target_num} 1 7 1 >> /tmp/uuu.lst fi if [[ ${intervene} -eq 1 ]]; then 7 Misc 7.1 How to enable Developer options on Android Jelly Bean and later version? Google has hidden the Developer options since the version Jelly Bean - here's how to get them back: Go to the Settings menu, and scroll down to "System". Tap it. Then Tap "About tablet" menu. Scroll down to the bottom again, where you see "Build number." Tap it seven times. After the third tap, you'll see a playful dialog that says you're four taps away from being a developer. Keep on tapping, until you've got the developer settings back. 7.2 How do I enable or disable bus frequency feature? The Bus Frequency driver is used to low down the DDR, AHB and AXI bus frequency in the SoC when the IPs who needs high bus frequency is not working. This saves the power consumption in Android earlysuspend mode significantly (playing audio with screen off). The bus frequency driver is   enabled   by default, if you want to enable or disable it, please do the following command in the console: Disable:    $ echo 0 > sys/bus/platform/drivers/imx_busfreq/busfreq/enable Enable:    $ echo 1 > sys/bus/platform/drivers/imx_busfreq/busfreq/enable Please note that if you're using ethernet, the up operation will enable the FEC clock and force bus frequency to be high. That means you can not go into low bus mode anymore, no matter the ethernet cable is plugged or unplugged. So if you want to system going to low bus mode, you must do 'netcfg eth0 down' to shutdown the FEC manually. If you want to use FEC again, please do 'netcfg eth0 up' manually, when FEC is shutdown with clock gated, the PHY can not detect your cable in/out events. 7.3 How do I use memtool?    7.3.1  build  memtool in Android environment git clone https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-test/ -b imx_5.4.24_2.1.0 cp -r imx-test/test/memtool ${MY_ANDROID}/external  cd  ${MY_ANDROID} source build/envsetup.sh lunch evk_8mm-userdebug mmm external/memtool             The built binaries stores at ${MY_ANDROID}/out/target/product/evk_8mm/vendor/bin/memtool_32 and ${MY_ANDROID}/out/target/product/evk_8mm/vendor/bin/memtool_64    7.3.2  rebuild  boot image             Add below patch to enable CONFIG_DEVMEM, then rebuild boot.img and flash it on board: fastboot flash boot_a boot.img diff --git a/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_defconfig b/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_defconfig index ee40b9aa67e6..cdc9a1d56849 100644 --- a/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_defconfig +++ b/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_defconfig @@ -477,7 +477,6 @@ CONFIG_INPUT_ISL29023=y # CONFIG_SERIO_SERPORT is not set CONFIG_SERIO_AMBAKMI=y # CONFIG_LEGACY_PTYS is not set -# CONFIG_DEVMEM is not set CONFIG_SERIAL_8250=y CONFIG_SERIAL_8250_CONSOLE=y CONFIG_SERIAL_8250_EXTENDED=y    7.3.3   use memtool on board Push memtool to board's disk: adb push ${MY_ANDROID}/out/target/product/ evk_8 mm /vendor/bin/memtool_32 /data/local/tmp Run memtool_32 to get help info: evk_8mm:/ # /data/local/tmp/memtool_32 Usage: Read memory: memtool [-8 | -16 | -32] <phys addr> <count> Write memory: memtool [-8 | -16 | -32] <phys addr>=<value>   7.4 How do I use systrace? The systrace tool can be used to  analyze Android device performance. Please refer to below links about what is systrace and how to use it: https://source.android.com/devices/tech/debug/systrace  https://developer.android.com/topic/performance/tracing/command-line  The systrace tool will require the "CONFIG_DEBUG_FS" config to be enabled or you may have below error when generating the report: Starting tracing (stop with enter) Tracing completed. Collecting output... /system/bin/sh: <stdin>[2]: can't create /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/trace_marker: No such file or directory Outputting Systrace results... In some new Android releases, the "CONFIG_DEBUG_FS" config is disabled by default, you will need to enable it by yourself to enable the systrace function. For example: diff --git a/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_car2_defconfig b/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_car2_defconfig index 9e38bb17d640..bf35ce161d6d 100644 --- a/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_car2_defconfig +++ b/arch/arm64/configs/imx_v8_android_car2_defconfig @@ -509,3 +509,4 @@ CONFIG_PANIC_TIMEOUT=5 CONFIG_DEBUG_LIST=y CONFIG_ENABLE_DEFAULT_TRACERS=y # CONFIG_UPROBE_EVENTS is not set +CONFIG_DEBUG_FS=y   8 Port ISP camera to Android It’s a quick guide for developers to port ISP camera from Linux to Android on evk_8mp. Assume you have already got the Android source code and know how to build and flash image. Those can be got from Android release docs. Below just focus on porting ISP camera. Also assume the camera works ok on Linux.   8.1 Driver code path vendor/nxp-opensource/verisilicon_sw_isp_vvcam   8.2 Driver compile 8.2.1  compile command Under Android root path, follow below commands. 1) source build/envsetup.sh 2) lunch evk_8mp-userdebug 3) ./imx-make.sh kernel -j8     // Just run once is ok 4) ./imx-make.sh vvcam -j8   If build ok, will generate ko under below path. fanghui@aps001:~/share_home2/android-11-5.10/out/target/product/evk_8mp$ ls obj/VVCAM_OBJ/ basler-camera-driver-vvcam.ko  kernelenv.sh  os08a20.ko  ov2775.ko  vvcam-dwe.ko  vvcam-isp.ko  vvcam-video.ko   8.2.2  compile arrangement Below are the related files vvcam/vvcam.mk If a new sensor is added. You need add copy script in vvcam.mk, such as cp $(VVCAM_SRC_PATH)/sensor/ov2775/ov2775.ko $(VVCAM_OUT);   vvcam/v4l2/Kbuild It’s copied from vvcam/v4l2/Makefile, just some necessary changes to make it build ok on Android. If there are changes for a new sensor in Makefile, should be aligned to Kbuild.   device/nxp/common/build/Makefile FYI. It’s where vvcam is added to the android build system. You should never change it. fanghui@aps001:~/share_home2/android-11-5.10/device/nxp$ grep -rn vvcam.mk common/build/Makefile:20:-include ${VVCAM_PATH}/vvcam/vvcam.mk   8.3 Driver update     On 8mp, GKI (genera kernel image) is used. ISP related KOs are built into vendor_boot.img, then flash to the board. Follow below command. cd ANDROID_ROOT    // assume “ANDROID_ROOT” is the root path of android code. ./imx-make.sh vendorbootimage -j8 adb reboot bootloader sudo fastboot flash vendor_boot out/target/product/evk_8mp/vendor_boot.img. sudo fastboot reboot After reboot, the updated KOs will be loaded   Note: If add new KO, need first add to device/nxp/imx8m/evk_8mp/SharedBoardConfig.mk as below. ifeq ($(IMX8MP_USES_GKI),true) BOARD_VENDOR_RAMDISK_KERNEL_MODULES +=     \     ……     $(TARGET_OUT_INTERMEDIATES)/VVCAM_OBJ/basler-camera-driver-vvcam.ko \     $(TARGET_OUT_INTERMEDIATES)/VVCAM_OBJ/vvcam-video.ko \     $(TARGET_OUT_INTERMEDIATES)/VVCAM_OBJ/vvcam-dwe.ko \     $(TARGET_OUT_INTERMEDIATES)/VVCAM_OBJ/vvcam-isp.ko \   8.4 DTB update 8.4.1  DTB arrangement In device/nxp/imx8m/evk_8mp/BoardConfig.mk, change below to your dtb.     # Default dual basler     TARGET_BOARD_DTS_CONFIG := imx8mp:imx8mp-evk-dual-basler.dtb   Related dts file should be under     vendor/nxp-opensource/kernel_imx/arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale   8.4.2  Build DTB image On ANDROID root path, run ./imx-make.sh kernel -j8 ./imx-make.sh dtboimage -j8 8.4.3  Update DTB image 1) adb reboot bootloader 2) sudo fastboot flash dtbo dtbo-imx8mp.img 3) sudo fastboot reboot   8.5 New sensor lib update 8.5.1  Build sensor lib      The default sensor is basler. If use new sensor, you need build your own libMySensor.so to implement interfaces in isi_iss.h.       You should got ISP code package by "wget https://www.nxp.com/lgfiles/NMG/MAD/YOCTO/isp-imx-4.2.2.15.0.bin". Note: the "isp-imx-4.2.2.15.0.bin" should be replaced the version you used.        Follow appshell/readme_android.txt to build the lib. 8.5.2  Update sensor lib       1) adb root       2) adb remount       3) adb pull  /vendor/etc/configs/isp/Sensor0_Entry.cfg       4) Change "drv ="/vendor/lib64/DAA3840_30MC_1080P.drv""           to "drv ="/vendor/lib64/libMySensor.so"".           Change xml and dwe to related files.       5) adb push Sensor0_Entry.cfg /vendor/etc/configs/isp/     Also, you may push related xml/dwe files.              
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What is Automotive Grade Linux? Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative, open source project that brings together automakers, suppliers, and technology companies for the purpose of building Linux-based, open source software platforms for automotive applications that can serve as de facto industry standards. AGL address all software in the vehicle: infotainment, instrument cluster, heads-up-display (HUD), telematics, connected car, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), functional safety, and autonomous driving. Architecture The Automotive Grade Linux Software Architecture diagram is below. The architecture consists of five layers. The App/HMI layer contains applications with their associated business logic and HMI. The Application Framework layer provides the APIs for creating both managing and running applications on an AGL system. The Services layer contains user space services that all applications can access. The Operating System (OS) layer provides the Linux kernel and device drivers along with standard OS utilities. For IVI (In Vehicle Infotainment) system a full fledged demo is available. Supported Boards The following table briefs about the various hardware platforms, supported by AGL : BOARD $MACHINE ARCHITECHTURE BeagleBone bbe arm32   beaglebone arm32       i.MX 6 cubox-i arm32   imx6qdlsabreauto arm32   nitrogen6x arm32       i.MX 8 imx8mqevk arm64   imx8mqevk-viv arm64       Snapdragon dragonboard-410c arm64   dragonboard-820c arm64       ARC HS hsdk ARC       virtio virtio-aarch64 arm64   AGL  Components AGL includes some major components showing as follow: agl-compositor waltham-receiver_waltham-transmitter rba drm-leasemanager appfw cynagora. pyagl pipewire_wireplumber agl-compositor When the AGL project was started, weston was chosen as the compositor, which is the reference implementation of a Wayland compositor, while for window management functionality it relied on ivi-shell (In-Vehicle Infotainment) together with an extension, called wayland-ivi-exension.   Waltham protocol is a IPC library similar to Wayland, developed with networking in mind. It operates over TCP sockets, while the wayland protocol only works locally over a UNIX socket. It retains wayland-esque paradigm, making use of XMLs to describe the protocol, and it follows an object-oriented design with an asynchronous architecture. DRM Lease Manager The DRM Lease Manager is used in AGL to allocate display controller outputs to different processes. Each process has direct access to its allocated output via the kernel DRM interface, and is prevented from accessing any other outputs managed by the display controller. PyAGL  PyAGL was written to be used as a testing framework replacing the Lua afb-test one, however the modules are written in a way that could be used as standalone utilities to query and evaluate apis and verbs from the App Framework Binder services in AGL. PipeWire / WirePlumber AGL uses the PipeWire daemon service to provide audio playback and capture capabilities. PipeWire is accompanied by a secondary service, WirePlumber (also referred to as the   session manager), which provides policy management, device discovery, configuration and more. Applications can connect to the PipeWire service through its UNIX socket, by using either the   libpipewire   or   libwireplumber   libraries as a front-end to that socket. How to port AGL in i.MX8qm get agl source as follow: repo init -b koi -uhttps://git.automotivelinux.org/AGL/AGL-repo repo sync apply patches in attachment add file agl_imx8qmmek.inc to path 'meta-agl\meta-agl-bsp\conf\include'. add files 40_bblayers.conf.inc, 50_local.conf.inc and 50_setup.sh to path 'meta-agl\templates\machine\imx8qmmek'. build as follow: source meta-agl/scripts/ aglsetup.sh  -f -m imx8qmmek agl-demo bitbake agl-demo-platform Then the wic image can be flashed into i.mx8qm showing as below:
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Important:  If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the   i.MX community.  Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response. i.MX 6/7 Family DDR Stress Test  The i.MX6/7 DDR Stress Test Tool is a PC-based software to fine-tune DDR parameters and verify the DDR performance on a non-OS, single-task environment(it is a light-weight test tool to test DDR performance). It performs write leveling, DQS gating and read/write delay calibration features. The tool described on this page cover the following i.MX 6/7 series SoCs: i.MX 6DQP (Dual/Quad Plus) i.MX 6DQ (Dual/Quad) i.MX 6DL/S (Dual Lite/Solo) i.MX 6SoloX i.MX 6SL i.MX 6SLL i.MX 6UL i.MX 6ULL/ULZ i.MX 7D/S i.MX 7ULP Note that the DDR Stress test tool supports the all of the above i.MX SoCs, however, some of the supported i.MX SoCs named in the tool support multiple i.MX SoCs as follows: MX6DQ – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6DQ and i.MX 6DQP (Plus) MX6DL – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6DL and i.MX 6S (i.MX 6DLS family) MX6ULL – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6ULL and i.MX6 ULZ MX7D – when selected, this supports both i.MX 7D and i.MX 7S The purpose of the i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools is to enable users to generate and test a custom DRAM initialization based on their device configuration (density, number of chip selects, etc.) and board layout (data bus bit swizzling, etc.). This process equips the user to then proceed with the bring-up of a boot loader and an OS. Once the OS is brought up, it is recommended to run an OS-based memory test (like Linux memtester) to further verify and test the DDR memory interface. The i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools consist of: DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA): i.MX 6/7 Series DDR Tool Release DDR Stress test: Described below There are three options to run the DDR Stress test. Each of these options are provided in the attached zip files. The following is a high-level overview of each option along with the naming convention of the associated zip file: Option 1 GUI based: Run the GUI executable and connect your board to the host PC via USB Archive file: ddr_stress_tester_vX.xx.zip The tool will first need to run a DDR initialization script for the specified i.MX SoC (refer to Load Init Script in the GUI tool).  Example initialization scripts based on NXP's development boards can be found in this zip file under the script folder.  Note, these scripts may need to be modified for your custom board and memory.   Option 2 DDR Stress Tester: JTAG Interface A hardware debugger connected to the board via the JTAG interface is used to download an elf file into the i.MX SoC OCRAM (internal RAM) and then begin execution. Results are shown on the UART serial port (115200-8-n-1). Archive file: ddr_stress_tester_jtag_vX.xx.zip As with the GUI tool, the JTAG/debugger option will first need to run a DDR initialization script for the specified i.MX SoC. Refer to the GUI tool description above for the location of the example scripts (which are found in the ddr_stress_tester_vX.xx.zip file). Note that the scripts are available either in the RealView ICE format (.inc file) or the DS-5 DSTERAM format (.ds). For other debuggers, the user will have to modify the script's command syntax for their specific debugger. This is also true if converting from a RealView Ice (.inc) format to a DS-5 DSTREAM (.ds) format and vice versa. The DDR Stress Tester executable (starting with V2.20) has an auto UART detection feature. If a different UART port for the serial console has been chosen than used on the NXP development tool (EVK, SABRE) specific commands can be added to the DDR initialization script that allows you to configure for the specific UART and then load and run the elf executable. Refer to the FAQ section of this community post and the txt file found in the JTAG archive file for instructions.   Option 3 U-Boot: The boot loader u-boot is running and commands in u-boot are used to download the bin file into SoC OCRAM and begin execution. Results are shown on the UART serial port (115200-8-n-1) Archive file: ddr_stress_tester_uboot_vX.xx.zip When downloading the DDR Stress Tool by u-boot, please copy the ddr-test-uboot-jtag-mxxxx.bin to SD card and load it to IRAM using the 'fatload' u-boot command (see notes below when using newer versions of u-boot). For i.MX6, please load the binary to 0x00907000. For i.MX7D, please load the binary to 0x00910000.  It is imperative to first disable the I and D cache in u-boot as shown below as the DDR Stress Test re-configures and re-enables the cache and MMU page table. While this option allows the user to load and run the DDR stress test from u-boot, NXP highly recommends executing the GUI based version for system testing and debugging. The u-boot version is considered a “last resort” for systems in production which may not have USB or JTAG connectivity. The reasons behind this stance are: In the GUI version, the system starts “clean” and uninitialized, whereas u-boot initializes many SoC features outside the knowledge of the DDR stress test and may conflict with the stress test operation When running the u-boot version, the test will overwrite the contents of u-boot residing in DDR, hence the test will overwrite any data in DDR. Once the stress test is loaded and executed, u-boot itself will no longer be accessible. To return to the functionality of u-boot, a system re-boot is required. Newer versions on u-boot do not allow a direct loading of the DDR stress test code from the SD card (boot media) directly to the SoC internal OCRAM (aka IRAM). Hence, the procedure is updated to first load the DDR stress test code into DDR and then copy into OCRAM, as shown in the procedure below: u-boot> dcache off;icache off;fatload mmc 2:1 0x12000000 ddr-test-uboot-jtag-mx6dq.bin;cp.b 0x12000000 0x00907000 0x20000;go 0x00907000 As u-boot initializes many peripherals that may conflict with the operation of the DDR stress test, it is necessary to clock gate these peripherals prior to running the DDR stress test. Hence, it is highly recommended to augment the procedure above as follows: u-boot> dcache off;icache off;fatload mmc 2:1 0x12000000 ddr-test-uboot-jtag-mx6dq.bin;cp.b 0x12000000 0x00907000 0x20000; u-boot> mw 0x020c4068 0x00C0000F; u-boot> mw 0x020c406c 0x00000000; u-boot> mw 0x020c4074 0x3F300000; u-boot> mw 0x020c4078 0x0000F300; u-boot> mw 0x020c407c 0x0F000003; u-boot> mw 0x020c4080 0x000003FC; u-boot> go 0x00907000 Note, in the above procedure, it is recommended to write to each clock gate register in separate commands (refer to commands starting with “mw”). The SoC requires a finite amount of time to gate each clock hence performing this sequence with a new command line write ensures the SoC has time to gate the intended clocks.   Stress Test Revision Features Comments 3.00 Add i.MX 7ULP support in the GUI version Known issues: USB connection is unstable when under USB HUB or some PC environments 2.92 Minor correction with write leveling calibration code error check to avoid a corner case of flagging an error when none have occurred.    2.91 Resolved issue with write leveling calibration code where a race condition in the code may result in the calibration routine not being able to find any delay values.   Only applies to MX6 series SoCs that support DDR3.   2.90 Reserve write delay line register (MMDC_MPWRDLCTL) configuration as DDR script does when do write calibration. In previous releases, MMDC_MPWRDLCTL would be changed to 0x40404040 by default.      * Further details available in the release notes  _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________    FAQ   Q. I see an error message that states "ERROR: DCD addr is out of valid range.", why is this and how do I resolve?   A. Sometimes, when using the register programming aid, there are registers writes that are not supported in the DCD range.  Try looking for the following items and comment them out from the DDR initialization script: wait = on setmem /16 0x020bc000 = 0x30 // disable watchdog (note the address for this may be different between i.MX6x devices)  Q. How do I select the "DDR Density" pull-down menu and what is the purpose of this?   A. The DDR Density pull-down menu gives the user the option of testing a DDR density smaller than what they actually have on their board.  The advantage of doing this is to speed up test time to allow the user to perform a "quick test" of their system.  IMPORTANT: it is imperative that the user not set this value higher than the supported density on their board, doing so will cause the stress test to fail and/or lock up. The DDR Density has a different meaning depending on the memory type being tested (DDR3 or LPDDR2): For DDR3, this is the density per CHIP SELECT.  So if your board has two chip selects, and each chip select has 512MB, you would simply select 512MB or lower.  The default setting will simply set this to the detected density per chip select. For LPDDR2, this is the density per CHANNEL.  This is only relevant for MX6 devices that support 2 channel LPDDR2 memories (MX6DQ, MX6DL).  For other MX6 devices that support only one LPDDR2 channel, then this is the total density (for the maximum setting) for that channel. Note that for LPDDR2, the number of chip selects (per channel) is irrelevant when selecting the density to test as the stress test combines both chip-selects into one combined density per channel.  For example, lets say you have a 2GB LPDDR2 device, which 2 channels and 2 chip-selects per channel.  That means you have 512MB per chip select, per channel.  Or, it also means you have 1GB per channel when combining both chip selects per channel.  In this case, you would choose (a maximum setting of) 1GB in the DDR Density drop down menu.  However, this is also the same setting as the default setting (which you are welcome to still choose 1GB to convince yourself that 1GB per channel is indeed being tested). Now let's assume you have only one channel (LPDDR2) and one chip select, with a density of 128MB; in this case, the maximum DDR Density you can select is 128MB. Let's assume you have one channel and two chip selects, each chip select is 128MB;  in this case, the maximum DDR Density you can select is 256MB (a combination of both chip selects).   Note, for the MX7D, an actual density needs to be entered. For the MX6x series, simply leaving this field as Default will cause the DDR stress test to ascertain the supported density from the DDR init script. As the MX7D DDR controller is different, this feature is not supported, hence it is required for the user to enter an actual density (for more details regarding MX7D usage of density and number of chip-selects, see the next FAQ on the DDR CS setting).   Q.  What is the purpose of the "DDR CS" pull-down option?   A.  The answer depends on which processor you are testing:   For the i.MX 6x series: This pull down menu gives you the option of testing one chip select (CS0) or ALL (both) chip selects *IF* you have a two-chip select configuration.  If you have a two-chip select configuration, then this allows you to test only one chip select for faster test time; else you can choose to test both chip selects.  Note that if you have a one-chip select configuration and you choose "ALL", the stress test will return an error.   For the iMX 7D: Because the MX7D DDR controller is different, the DDR stress test will need the user to supply the entire supported density found on their board. The chip select field should be left as is (0) as the test will naturally test one chip select to the next. For example, let’s assume you are using two chip selects, with each chip select being 512MB. In this case, you would enter 1GB for the DDR Density field ensuring that both chip selects will be tested. The user is allowed to enter a density less than the density found on their board (for quicker testing), but keeping in mind both chip selects may not be tested in this case.   Q. I run DDR calibration using the DDR Stress Test Tool to obtain the calibration results.  Are these calibration parameters are written to the uboot flash_header.S automatically or manually?   A. The calibration values obtained from the DDR Stress Test Tool will need to be manually updated in the flash_header.S file or any other DDR initialization script.   Q. When running the DDR stress test on MX7D and I try to perform calibration, I get an error stating that calibration is not supported, is this expected?   A. Yes, calibration is not supported or needed when using MX7.  The reason is, MX7 uses a different memory controller than the MX6 series.  The MX6 series memory controller has built-in support for calibration where the MX7 memory controller does not.   Q. When running the GUI version of the DDR stress test, on MX7 and I leave DDR Density as default, I get an error in the tool stating I must supply a density.  Why is this?   A. This is due to the fact that MX7 uses a different memory controller than the MX6 series.  In the MX6 series, it was possible to calculate the memory density from the memory controller register settings.  The MX7 memory controller is different and does not lend itself to easily calculate the supported density based on the register settings.  Instead, the user should verify the density on their board and selected this value in the DDR Density pull-down menu.    Q. I noticed that when I run write-leveling calibration I sometimes see a note that due to the write-leveling calibration value being greater than 1/8 clock cycle that WALAT must be set to 1.  What does this mean?   A. In the MMDC chapter of the reference manual for the specific i.MX 6 device, the need to set WALAT is described in the MDMISC register as follows: " The purpose of WALAT is to add time delay at the end of a burst write operation to ensure that the JEDEC time specification for Write Post Amble Delay (tWPST) is met (DQS strobe is held low at the end of a write burst for > 30% a clock cycle before it is released). If the value of any of the WL_DL_ABS_OFFSETn register fields are greater than ‘1F’, WALAT should be set to ‘1’ (cycle additional delay). WALAT should be further increased for any full-cycle delays added by the WL_CYC_DELn register fields. " Therefore, if the write-leveling calibration routine detects any write-leveling delay value greater than 0x1F, it will note to the user that WALAT must be set and the user should update their DDR3 init script to ensure WALAT is set.  Sometimes, a user may find that the write-leveling delay value may fluctuate from one run to the next, which is quite normal.  If it is found that this delay is "borderline" meaning sometimes it is greater than 0x1F and sometimes it might be slightly less, then it is ok to go ahead and set WALAT permanently in your init script as there is no harm in doing so and will ensure you will stay within JEDEC's tWPST.   Q. I sometimes see that after running write-leveling calibration that delay values being reported back are zero'd out (0x00), and then at times I see a non-zero value being reported, why is this? A. It is quite normal to see slight variations in the delay value between write-leveling calibration runs.  The write-leveling calibration routine assumes a majority of users have designed their board such that the DDR3 memories are placed close to the i.MX 6 SoC. There’s a mechanism in NXP’s DDR Stress test write leveling calibration code that checks the returned write leveling value. If the write-leveling calibration routine detects that the returned delay value is greater than ¾ of a clock cycle, it will "zero out" the delay value. It does this because it assumes that such a large delay result is due to the fact that the DQS signal is already delayed relative to the SDCLK, and to align DQS with SDCLK requires the calibration routine to delay DQS even further to align it to the next SDCLK edge, something we ideally would like to avoid.  JEDEC specs that the DQS edge must be within 25% of a SDCLK cycle with respect to the SDCLK edge, so having DQS initially slightly delayed from SDCLK is actually ok, hence why the calibration routine “zero’s” this out when the returned value exceeds ¾ of a clock cycle.  In cases like this, the DQS edge and SDCLK edge are so close together that in some calibration runs, the DQS edge may slightly precede SDCLK (resulting in a very small write-leveling delay value) and other runs, it may be slightly delayed relative to the SDCLK (resulting in a very large write-leveling delay value that will try to align DQS to the next SDCLK edge, hence needs to be zero’d out).   Q. When using the JTAG version of the DDR stress test, how can I select a different UART port for my serial port?   A. Under the folder ddr_stress_tester_jtag_v2.52, there's a text file that describes how to add a different UART port by adding a few additional commands to your DDR init script.  The following is an outline of these commands: 1. Ungate UART module clocks (most NXP scripts ungate all of the peripheral clocks at the beginning of the script, so this part is already done) 2. Configure the IOMUX options for the pins you wish the UART to use (normally an IOMUX option for UART_TX and UART_RX, and a daisy chain option for the UART_RX input) 3. Enable the desired UART module via the register UCR1, bit UART_EN 4. Disable other UART modules (UCR1[UART_EN] = 0).  Normally disabling UART1 should be sufficient, but it doesn't hurt to disable all of the other un-used UART options for the purpose of the stress test.   Here's an example in the .ds file vernacular of a set up as follows: MX6DQ, UART4 on KEY_COL0 and KEY_ROW0 (assume clock is ungated to all peripherals): mem set 0x020E01F8 32 0x00000004   #// config_pad_mode(KEY_COL0, ALT4) mem set 0x020E01FC 32 0x00000004   #// config_pad_mode(KEY_ROW0, ALT4); mem set 0x020E0938 32 0x00000001   #// Pad KEY_ROW0 is involved in Daisy Chain. mem set 0x02020080 32 0x00000000   #//disable UART1 in UART1_UCR1 (Note, you can disable other UART modules as well) mem set 0x021F0080 32 0x00000001   #//enable UART4 in UART4_UCR1   Here's another example in the .inc file vernacular of a set up as follows: MX6SX, UART5 on SD4_DATA4 abd SD4_DATA5 (assume clock is ungated to all peripherals): setmem /32 0x020E0294 = 0x2 //IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_SD4_DATA5, ALT2; UART5_TX_DATA setmem /32 0x020E0290 = 0x2 //IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_SD4_DATA4, ALT2; UART5_RX_DATA setmem /32 0x020E0850 = 0x00000000 // IOMUXC_UART5_IPP_UART_RXD_MUX_SELECT_INPUT, daisy chain for UART5_RX input to use SD4_DATA4 setmem /32 0x021F4080 = 0x00000001 // Enable UART_EN in UCR1 of UART5 // Disable UART_EN in UCR1 of UART1, UART2, UART3, and UART4 setmem /32 0x02020080 = 0x00000000 // UART1 setmem /32 0x021F0080 = 0x00000000 // UART2 setmem /32 0x021EC080 = 0x00000000 // UART3 setmem /32 0x021E8080 = 0x00000000 // UART4     Related Resources Links: iMX 8M Mini Register Programming Aid DRAM PLL setting  i.MX 8/8X Series DDR Tool Release  i.MX 8M Family DDR Tool Release 
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This article introduces how to connect a device via Bluetooth to the i.MX8M family of boards.
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the  i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response. i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools Overview The i.MX 8M Family DDR Tool is a Windows-based software to help users to do LPDDR4/DDR4/DDR3L training, stress test and DDR initial code generation for u-boot SPL.  This page contains the latest releases for the i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools and cover the following SoCs : i.MX 8M Quad and its derivatives i.MX 8 M Quadlite and i.MX 8M Dual i.MX 8M Mini Quad and its derivatives i.MX 8M Mini Quadlite/Dual/DualLite/Solo/SoloLite  i.MX 8M Nano Quad and   its derivatives i.MX 8M Nano Quadlite/Dual/DualLite/Solo/SoloLite  i.MX 8M Plus   NOTE: For the i.MX 8/8X Family of DDR tools please refer to the: i.MX 8/8X Family DDR Tools Release   The purpose of the i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools is to enable users to generate and test a custom DRAM initialization based on their device configuration (density, number of chip selects, etc.) and board layout (data bus bit swizzling, etc.).  This process equips the user to then proceed with the bring-up of a boot loader and an OS.  Once the OS is brought up, it is recommended to run an OS-based memory test (like Linux memtester) to further verify and test the DDR memory interface.     The  i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools consist of: DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) DDR Stress test   For more details regarding these DDR tools and their usage, refer to the i.MX 8M DDR Tools User Guide.   i.MX 8M Family DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) The i.MX 8M DDR RPA (or simply RPA) is an Excel spreadsheet tool used to develop DDR initialization for a user’s specific DDR configuration (DDR device type, density, etc.). The RPA generates the DDR initialization(in a separate Excel worksheet tab):   DDR Stress Test Script : This format is used specifically with the DDR stress test by first copying the contents in this worksheet tab and then pasting it to a text file, naming the document with the “.ds” file extension. The user will select this file when executing the DDR stress test. The How to Use  Excel worksheet tab provides instructions on using the RPA   i.MX 8M Family DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA): Current Versions To obtain the latest RPAs, please refer to the following links (note, existing RPAs have been removed from this main page and moved to the SoC specific links below): i.MX 8M Quad : https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8M-m850D-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1172441 i.MX 8M Mini : https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MMini-m845S-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1172443 i.MX 8M Nano: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MNano-m815S-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1172444 i.MX 8M Plus: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MP-m865-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1235352   Processor Mask Revisions Memory Supported Latest RPA Version * i.MX 8M Quad & Derivatives All LPDDR4 Rev 29 i.MX 8M Quad & Derivatives All DDR4 Rev 13 i.MX 8M Quad & Derivatives All DDR3L Rev 7 i.MX 8M Mini  & Derivatives A0 LPDDR4 Rev 19 i.MX 8M Mini  & Derivatives A0 DDR4 Rev 15 i.MX 8M Mini  & Derivatives A0 DDR3L Rev 8 i.MX 8M Nano  & Derivatives A0 LPDDR4 Rev 5 i.MX 8M  Nano   & Derivatives A0 DDR4 Rev 6 i.MX 8M  Nano   & Derivatives A0 DDR3L Rev 3 i.MX 8M Plus & Derivatives A1 LPDDR4 Rev 6 i.MX 8M Plus & Derivatives A1 DDR4 Rev 3 * For the details about the updates, please refer to the Revision History tab of the respective RPA.    To modify the DRAM Frequency for a custom setting refer to iMX 8M Mini Register Programming Aid DRAM PLL setting    i.MX 8M Family DDR Stress Test    The i.MX 8M Family  DDR stress test tool is a Windows-based software tool that is used as a mechanism to verify that the DDR initialization is operational for use with u-boot and OS bring-up. To install the DDR Stress Test, save and extract the zip file mscale_ddr_tool_vXXX_setup.exe.zip     (where 'xxx' is the current version number) and follow the on-screen installation instructions.     i.MX 8M Family DDR Stress Test   Requirements   The tool requires access to the Windows registry, hence  users must run it in administrator mode . When users design new i.MX 8M Family boards, please make sure to follow the rules outlined in the respective Hardware Developers Guide and the MSCALE_DDR_Tool_User_Guide , which can help users bring up DDR devices on their respective i.MX 8M boards.   i.MX 8M Family DDR Stress Test  User Guide   The i.MX 8M DDR Stress Test tool includes the document: MSCALE_DDR_Tool_User_Guide NOTE: Please read the MSCALE_DDR_Tool_User_Guide inside the package carefully before you use this tool.   DDR Stress Test Revision History   Rev Major Changes* (Features) Comments 3.30 Fix DBI enabled issue for all i.MX 8M series Automatically identify ROHM and PCA9450 PMICs on i.MX 8M Nano board Fix 4GB/8GB memory tester issues   3.20 Add support to i.MX 8M Plus   3.10 Fixe UART communication issues for some specific characters between the PC software and the target board. Fine-tune DDRPHY registers in generated C code.   3.00 Add support to i.MX8M-nano Add support to different PMIC or PMIC configuration Add support to stress test for all DDR frequency points RPA tools for Nano include support for DDR3L, DDR4, and LPDDR4.   Note that the DDR3L and LPDDR4 RPAs contain the name preliminary only to denote that these RPAs are based on internal NXP validation boards where the DDR4 RPA is based on the released EVK.   2.10 Change DDR4 capacity computing method   2.00 Add support to i.MX8M-mini   * Further details available in the release notes   Sample configuration in the .ds script for i.MX 8M debug UART2: ################step 0: configure debug uart port. Assumes use of UART IO Pads.   ##### ##### If using non-UART pads (i.e. using other pads to mux out the UART signals), ##### ##### then it is up to the user to overwrite the following IO register settings   ##### memory set 0x3033023C 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART2_RXD memory set 0x30330240 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART2_TXD memory set 0x303304A4 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART2_RXD memory set 0x303304A8 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART2_TXD memory set 0x303304FC 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART2_SEL_RXD sysparam set debug_uart   1 #UART index from 0 ('0' = UART1, '1' = UART2, '2' = UART3, '3' = UART4)   Sample configuration in the front of the .ds script for i.MX 8M debug UART3  ################step 0: configure debug uart port. Assumes use of UART IO Pads.   ##### ##### If using non-UART pads (i.e. using other pads to mux out the UART signals), ##### ##### then it is up to the user to overwrite the following IO register settings   ##### memory set 0x30330244 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART3_RXD memory set 0x30330248 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART3_TXD memory set 0x303304AC 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART3_RXD memory set 0x303304B0 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART3_TXD memory set 0x30330504 32 0x00000002 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART3_SEL_RXD sysparam set debug_uart   2 #UART index from 0 ('0' = UART1, '1' = UART2, '2' = UART3, '3' = UART4)   Sample configuration in the front of the .ds script for i.MX 8M Mini PMIC configuration: ##############step 0.5: configure I2C port IO pads according to your PCB design.   ##### ########### You can modify the following instructions to adapt to your board PMIC ####### memory set 0x30330214 32 0x00000010  #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_I2C1_SCL memory set 0x30330218 32 0x00000010  #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_I2C1_SDA memory set 0x3033047C 32 0x000000C6 #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_I2C1_SCL memory set 0x30330480 32 0x000000C6  #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_I2C1_SDA sysparam set pmic_cfg 0x004B #bit[7:0] = PMIC addr,bit[15:8]=I2C Bus. Bus index from 0 ('0' = I2C1, '1' = I2C2, '2' = I2C3, '3' = I2C4) sysparam set pmic_set 0x2F01 #bit[7:0] = Reg val, bit[15:8]=Reg addr. #REG(0x2F) = 0x01 sysparam set pmic_set 0x0C02   #REG(0x0C) = 0x02 sysparam set pmic_set 0x171E   #REG(0x17) = 0x1E sysparam set pmic_set 0x0C00   #REG(0x0C) = 0x00 sysparam set pmic_set 0x2F11    #REG(0x2F)=0x11   Related Resources Links: iMX 8M Mini Register Programming Aid DRAM PLL setting  i.MX 8/8X Series DDR Tool Release  i.MX 6/7 DDR Stress test GUI Tool i.MX 8M Application Processor Related Resources i.MX8M (m850D) DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA)  i.MX8MMini (m845S) DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA)  i.MX8MNano (m815S) DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) 
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This is a detailed programming aid for the registers associated with i.MX 8MMini (m845S) DDR initialization.  For more details, refer to the main mScale DDR tools page: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX-8M-Family-DDR-Tool-Release/ta-p/1104467 Please note that this page is only intended to store the RPA spreadsheets. For questions, please create a new community thread.
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    Xenomai is real-time framework, which can run seamlessly side-by-side Linux as a co-kernel system, or natively over mainline Linux kernels (with or without PREEMPT-RT patch). The dual kernel nicknamed Cobalt, is a significant rework of the Xenomai 2.x system. Cobalt implements the RTDM specification for interfacing with real-time device drivers. The native linux version, an enhanced implementation of the experimental Xenomai/SOLO work, is called Mercury. In this environment, only a standalone implementation of the RTDM specification in a kernel module is required, for interfacing the RTDM-compliant device drivers with the native kernel. You can get more detailed information from Home · Wiki · xenomai / xenomai · GitLab       I have ported xenomai 3.1 to i.MX Yocto 4.19.35-1.1.0, and currently support ARM64 and test on i.MX8MQ EVK board. I did over night test( 5 real-time threads + GPU SDK test case) and stress test by tool stress-ng on  i.MX8MQ EVK board. It looks lile pretty good. Current version (20200730) also support i.MX8MM EVK.     You need git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm64.git, and git checkout xenomai-4.19.35-1.1.0-20200818 (which inlcudes all patches and bb file) and add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build xenomai by command bitake xenomai.  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt"  PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "4.19-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "4.19-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt", you can build dual kernel version. And If  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury", it is single kernel with PREEMPT-RT patch. The following is test result by the command ( /usr/xenomai/demo/cyclictest -p 99 -t 5 -m -n -i 1000  -l 100000 😞 //Over normal Linux kernel without GPU SDK test case T: 0 ( 4220) P:99 I:1000 C: 100000 Min: 7 Act: 10 Avg: 9 Max: 23 T: 1 ( 4221) P:99 I:1500 C: 66672 Min: 7 Act: 10 Avg: 10 Max: 20 T: 2 ( 4222) P:99 I:2000 C: 50001 Min: 7 Act: 12 Avg: 10 Max: 81 T: 3 ( 4223) P:99 I:2500 C: 39998 Min: 7 Act: 11 Avg: 10 Max: 29 T: 4 ( 4224) P:99 I:3000 C: 33330 Min: 7 Act: 13 Avg: 10 Max: 26 //Over normal Linux kernel with GPU SDK test case T: 0 ( 4177) P:99 I:1000 C: 100000 Min: 7 Act: 10 Avg: 11 Max: 51 T: 1 ( 4178) P:99 I:1500 C: 66673 Min: 7 Act: 12 Avg: 10 Max: 35 T: 2 ( 4179) P:99 I:2000 C: 50002 Min: 7 Act: 12 Avg: 11 Max: 38 T: 3 ( 4180) P:99 I:2500 C: 39999 Min: 7 Act: 12 Avg: 11 Max: 42 T: 4 ( 4181) P:99 I:3000 C: 33330 Min: 7 Act: 12 Avg: 11 Max: 36   //Cobalt with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M --timeout 600s --metrics-brief T: 0 ( 4259) P:50 I:1000 C:3508590 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    0 Max:      42 T: 1 ( 4260) P:50 I:1500 C:2338831 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    0 Max:      36 T: 2 ( 4261) P:50 I:2000 C:1754123 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    1 Max:      42 T: 3 ( 4262) P:50 I:2500 C:1403298 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    1 Max:      45 T: 4 ( 4263) P:50 I:3000 C:1169415 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    1 Max:      22   //Cobalt without GPU SDK test case T: 0 ( 4230) P:50 I:1000 C: 100000 Min: 0 Act: 0 Avg: 0 Max: 4 T: 1 ( 4231) P:50 I:1500 C:   66676 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 4 T: 2 ( 4232) P:50 I:2000 C:   50007 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 8 T: 3 ( 4233) P:50 I:2500 C:   40005 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 3 T: 4 ( 4234) P:50 I:3000 C:   33338 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 5 //Cobalt with GPU SDK  test case T: 0 ( 4184) P:99 I:1000 C:37722968 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 24 T: 1 ( 4185) P:99 I:1500 C:25148645 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 33 T: 2 ( 4186) P:99 I:2000 C:18861483 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 22 T: 3 ( 4187) P:99 I:2500 C:15089187 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 23 T: 4 ( 4188) P:99 I:3000 C:12574322 Min: 0 Act: 1 Avg: 0 Max: 29 //Mercury without GPU SDK  test case T: 0 ( 4287) P:99 I:1000 C:1000000 Min: 6 Act: 7 Avg: 7 Max: 20 T: 1 ( 4288) P:99 I:1500 C:  666667 Min: 6 Act: 9 Avg: 7 Max: 17 T: 2 ( 4289) P:99 I:2000 C:  499994 Min: 6 Act: 8 Avg: 7 Max: 24 T: 3 ( 4290) P:99 I:2500 C:  399991 Min: 6 Act: 9 Avg: 7 Max: 19 T: 4 ( 4291) P:99 I:3000 C:  333322 Min: 6 Act: 8 Avg: 7 Max: 21 //Mercury with GPU SDK  test case T: 0 ( 4222) P:99 I:1000 C:1236790 Min: 6 Act: 7 Avg: 7 Max: 55 T: 1 ( 4223) P:99 I:1500 C:  824518 Min: 6 Act: 7 Avg: 7 Max: 44 T: 2 ( 4224) P:99 I:2000 C:  618382 Min: 6 Act: 8 Avg: 8 Max: 88 T: 3 ( 4225) P:99 I:2500 C:  494701 Min: 6 Act: 7 Avg: 8 Max: 49 T: 4 ( 4226) P:99 I:3000 C:  412247 Min: 6 Act: 7 Avg: 8 Max: 53 //////////////////////////////////////// Update for Yocto L5.4.47 2.2.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release for Yocto release L5.4.47 2.2.0 and it supports i.MX8M series (8MQ,8MM,8MN and 8MP). You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm64.git,  and git checkout xenomai-5.4.47-2.2.0. You need to add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build xenomai by command bitake imx-image-multimedia.  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt"  PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "5-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "5-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" //////////////////////////////////////// Update for Yocto L5.4.70 2.3.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release  for Yocto release L5.4.70 2.3.0 and it supports i.MX8M series (8MQ,8MM,8MN and 8MP) and i.MX8QM/QXP. You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm64.git and git checkout xenomai-5.4.70-2.3.0. Updating: 1, Support i.MX8QM and i.MX8QXP 2, Fix altency's the issue which uses legacy API to get time   //////////////////////////////////////// update for Yocto L5.4.70 2.3.2  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release for Yocto release L5.4.70 2.3.2. You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm64.git, and git checkout xenomai-5.4.70-2.3.2. Updating: 1, Enable Xenomai RTDM driver in Linux Kernel 2, Currently CAN, UART, GPIO,  SPI and Ethernet (in debug for RTNet)  are added in Xenomai. 3, Add KERNEL_DEVICETREE += " freescale/imx8mp-rt-evk.dtb " in sources/meta-imx/meta-bsp/conf/machine/imx8mpevk.conf to enable relative device in Xenomai domain, for example rt-imx8mp-flexcan.   //////////////////////////////////////// Update for Yocto L5.4.70 2.3.3  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release for Yocto release L5.4.70 2.3.3. You need to git clonehttps://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm64.git and git checkout xenomai-5.4.70-2.3.3. Updating: 1, Enable RTNet FEC driver 2, Currently CAN, UART, GPIO,  SPI and Ethernet ( FEC Controller)  are added in Xenomai. 3, Add KERNEL_DEVICETREE += " freescale/imx8mp-rt-evk.dtb " in sources/meta-imx/meta-bsp/conf/machine/imx8mpevk.conf and KERNEL_DEVICETREE += " freescale/imx8mm-rt-ddr4-evk.dtb " in sources/meta-imx/meta-bsp/conf/machine/imx8mmddr4evk.conf to enable rt_fec device in Xenomai domain. Verifying the network connection by RTnet Ping Between i.MX8M Mini EVK and i.MX8M Plus EVK a, Setup test environment 1, Connect ENET1 of  i.MX8M Plus EVK (used as a master) and  ENET of i.MX8M Mini EVK (used as a slave) of  to a switch or hub 2, Modify /usr/xenomai/etc/rtnet.conf in i.MX8M Plus EVK board as the following: @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ MODULE_EXT=".ko" # RT-NIC driver -RT_DRIVER="rt_eepro100" +RT_DRIVER="rt_fec" RT_DRIVER_OPTIONS="" # PCI addresses of RT-NICs to claim (format: 0000:00:00.0) @@ -30,8 +30,8 @@ REBIND_RT_NICS="" # The TDMA_CONFIG file overrides these parameters for masters and backup # masters. Leave blank if you do not use IP addresses or if this station is # intended to retrieve its IP from the master based on its MAC address. -IPADDR="10.0.0.1" -NETMASK="" +IPADDR="192.168.100.101" +NETMASK="255.255.255.0" # Start realtime loopback device ("yes" or "no") RT_LOOPBACK="yes" @@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ TDMA_MODE="master" # Master parameters # Simple setup: List of TDMA slaves -TDMA_SLAVES="10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3 10.0.0.4" +TDMA_SLAVES="192.168.100.102" # Simple setup: Cycle time in microsecond TDMA_CYCLE="5000" 3, Modify /usr/xenomai/etc/rtnet.conf in i.MX8M Mini EVK board as the following: @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ MODULE_EXT=".ko" # RT-NIC driver -RT_DRIVER="rt_eepro100" +RT_DRIVER="rt_fec" RT_DRIVER_OPTIONS="" # PCI addresses of RT-NICs to claim (format: 0000:00:00.0) @@ -30,8 +30,8 @@ REBIND_RT_NICS="" # The TDMA_CONFIG file overrides these parameters for masters and backup # masters. Leave blank if you do not use IP addresses or if this station is # intended to retrieve its IP from the master based on its MAC address. -IPADDR="10.0.0.1" -NETMASK="" +IPADDR="192.168.100.102" +NETMASK="255.255.255.0" # Start realtime loopback device ("yes" or "no") RT_LOOPBACK="yes" @@ -59,13 +59,13 @@ STAGE_2_CMDS="" # TDMA mode of the station ("master" or "slave") # Start backup masters in slave mode, it will then be switched to master # mode automatically during startup. -TDMA_MODE="master" +TDMA_MODE="slave" # Master parameters # Simple setup: List of TDMA slaves -TDMA_SLAVES="10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3 10.0.0.4" +TDMA_SLAVES="192.168.100.102" # Simple setup: Cycle time in microsecond TDMA_CYCLE="5000" 4, rename imx8mm-rt-ddr4-evk.dtb to imx8mm-ddr4-evk.dtb in /run/media/mmcblk1p1,  rename imx8mp-rt-evk.dtb to imx8mp-evk.dtb in /run/media/mmcblk1p1, and reboot board. 5, Run the below command on i.MX8M Mini EVK board. cd /usr/xenomai/sbin/ ./rtnet start & 5, Run the below command on i.MX8M Plus EVK board. cd /usr/xenomai/sbin/ ./rtnet start & When you see the log (rt_fec_main 30be0000.ethernet (unnamed net_device) (uninitialized): Link is Up - 100Mbps/Full - flow control rx/tx) and you can run command "./rtroute" to check route table if the slave IP (192.168.100.102) is in route.. b, Verify the network connection using the command below: ./rtping -s 1024 192.168.100.102 //////////////////////////////////////// Update for Yocto L5.10.52 2.1.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release for Yocto release L10.52 2.1.0. You need to git clonehttps://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm64.git and git checkout xenomai-5.10.52-2.1.0. Updating: 1, Upgrade Xenomai to v3.2 2, Enable Dovetail instead of ipipe. Copy xenomai-arm64 to <Yocto folder>/sources/meta-imx/meta-bsp/recipes-kernel, and add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build Image with xenomai enable by command bitake imx-image-multimedia . XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" Notice: If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt", you can build dual kernel version. And If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury", it is single kernel with PREEMPT-RT patch.  Latency testing of Xenomai3.2+Dovetail with isolating CPU 2,3 ( Xenomai 3.2 on 8MM DDR4 EVK with GPU test case (GLES3/S08_EnvironmentMappingRefraction_Wayland) + iperf3 + 2 ping 65000 size + stress-ng --cpu 2 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 256M --metrics-brief ) 😞 The following is test result by the command ( /usr/xenomai/demo/cyclictest -a 2,3 -p 50 -t 5 -m -n -i 1000) root@imx8mmddr4evk:~# /usr/xenomai/demo/cyclictest -a 2,3 -p 50 -t 5 -m -n -i 1000 # /dev/cpu_dma_latency set to 0us policy: fifo: loadavg: 5.96 6.04 6.03 7/155 1349 T: 0 ( 615) P:50 I:1000 C:63448632 Min: 0 Act: 0 Avg: 0 Max: 55 T: 1 ( 616) P:50 I:1500 C:42299087 Min: 0 Act: 0 Avg: 1 Max: 43 T: 2 ( 617) P:50 I:2000 C:31724315 Min: 0 Act: 0 Avg: 1 Max: 51 T: 3 ( 618) P:50 I:2500 C:25379452 Min: 0 Act: 0 Avg: 1 Max: 53 T: 4 ( 619) P:50 I:3000 C:21149543 Min: 0 Act: 0 Avg: 1 Max: 47        
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    Test environment: MPU6050 module,i.MX8MP,Android11_2.4.0 This solution ported the MPU6050 module on Android to realize auto rotation of screen.      
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    Xenomai is real-time framework, which can run seamlessly side-by-side Linux as a co-kernel system, or natively over mainline Linux kernels (with or without PREEMPT-RT patch). The dual kernel nicknamed Cobalt, is a significant rework of the Xenomai 2.x system. Cobalt implements the RTDM specification for interfacing with real-time device drivers. The native linux version, an enhanced implementation of the experimental Xenomai/SOLO work, is called Mercury. In this environment, only a standalone implementation of the RTDM specification in a kernel module is required, for interfacing the RTDM-compliant device drivers with the native kernel. You can get more detailed information from Home · Wiki · xenomai / xenomai · GitLab       I have ported xenomai 3.1 to i.MX Yocto 4.19.35-1.1.0, and currently support ARMv7 and tested on imx6ulevk/imx6ull14x14evk/imx6qpsabresd/imx6dlsabresd/imx6sxsabresdimx6slevk boards. I also did stress test by tool stress-ng on some boards.      You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm.git, and git checkout Linux-4.19.35-1.1.0. (which inlcudes all patches and bb file) and add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build xenomai by command bitake xenomai.  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt"  PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "4.19-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" DISTRO_FEATURES_remove = "optee" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "4.19-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" DISTRO_FEATURES_remove = "optee" If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt", you can build dual kernel version. And If  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury", it is single kernel with PREEMPT-RT patch. The following is test result by the command ( /usr/xenomai/demo/cyclictest -p 50 -t 5 -m -n -i 1000 😞 //Mecury on 6ULL with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 128M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 6.08 2.17 0.81 8/101 534 T: 0 (  530) P:99 I:1000 C:  74474 Min:     23 Act:  235 Avg:   77 Max:    8278 T: 1 (  531) P:99 I:1500 C:  49482 Min:     24 Act:   32 Avg:   56 Max:    8277 T: 2 (  532) P:99 I:2000 C:  36805 Min:     24 Act:   38 Avg:   79 Max:    8170 T: 3 (  533) P:99 I:2500 C:  29333 Min:     25 Act:   41 Avg:   54 Max:    7069 T: 4 (  534) P:99 I:3000 C:  24344 Min:     24 Act:   51 Avg:   60 Max:    7193   //Cobalt on 6ULL with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 128M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 7.02 6.50 4.01 8/100 660 T: 0 (  652) P:50 I:1000 C: 560348 Min:      1 Act:   10 Avg:   15 Max:      71 T: 1 (  653) P:50 I:1500 C: 373556 Min:      1 Act:    9 Avg:   17 Max:      78 T: 2 (  654) P:50 I:2000 C: 280157 Min:      2 Act:   14 Avg:   20 Max:      64 T: 3 (  655) P:50 I:2500 C: 224120 Min:      1 Act:   12 Avg:   15 Max:      57 T: 4 (  656) P:50 I:3000 C: 186765 Min:      1 Act:   31 Avg:   19 Max:      53   //Cobalt on 6qp with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 8.11 7.44 4.45 8/156 1057 T: 0 (  917) P:50 I:1000 C: 686106 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    5 Max:      53 T: 1 (  918) P:50 I:1500 C: 457395 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    5 Max:      49 T: 2 (  919) P:50 I:2000 C: 342866 Min:      0 Act:    2 Avg:    4 Max:      43 T: 3 (  920) P:50 I:2500 C: 274425 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    5 Max:      58 T: 4 (  921) P:50 I:3000 C: 228682 Min:      0 Act:    2 Avg:    6 Max:      46   //Cobalt on 6dl with stress-ng --cpu 2 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 256M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 3.35 4.15 2.47 1/122 850 T: 0 (  729) P:50 I:1000 C: 608088 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    3 Max:      34 T: 1 (  730) P:50 I:1500 C: 405389 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    4 Max:      38 T: 2 (  731) P:50 I:2000 C: 304039 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    4 Max:      45 T: 3 (  732) P:50 I:2500 C: 243225 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    4 Max:      49 T: 4 (  733) P:50 I:3000 C: 202683 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    5 Max:      38   //Cobalt on 6SX stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M  --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 7.51 7.19 6.66 8/123 670 T: 0 (  598) P:50 I:1000 C:2314339 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    8 Max:      60 T: 1 (  599) P:50 I:1500 C:1542873 Min:      0 Act:   15 Avg:    8 Max:      72 T: 2 (  600) P:50 I:2000 C:1157152 Min:      0 Act:    4 Avg:    9 Max:      55 T: 3 (  601) P:50 I:2500 C: 925721 Min:      0 Act:    5 Avg:    9 Max:      57 T: 4 (  602) P:50 I:3000 C: 771434 Min:      0 Act:    6 Avg:    6 Max:      41   //Cobalt on 6Solo lite stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M  --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 7.01 7.04 6.93 8/104 598 T: 0 (  571) P:50 I:1000 C:3639967 Min:      0 Act:    9 Avg:    7 Max:      60 T: 1 (  572) P:50 I:1500 C:2426642 Min:      0 Act:    9 Avg:   11 Max:      66 T: 2 (  573) P:50 I:2000 C:1819980 Min:      0 Act:   11 Avg:   10 Max:      57 T: 3 (  574) P:50 I:2500 C:1455983 Min:      0 Act:   12 Avg:   10 Max:      56 T: 4 (  575) P:50 I:3000 C:1213316 Min:      0 Act:    7 Avg:    9 Max:      43   //Cobalt on 7d with stress-ng --cpu 2 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 256M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 5.03 5.11 5.15 6/107 683 T: 0 (  626) P:50 I:1000 C:6842938 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    2 Max:      63 T: 1 (  627) P:50 I:1500 C:4561953 Min:      0 Act:    4 Avg:    2 Max:      66 T: 2 (  628) P:50 I:2000 C:3421461 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    2 Max:      69 T: 3 (  629) P:50 I:2500 C:2737166 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    2 Max:      71 T: 4 (  630) P:50 I:3000 C:2280969 Min:      0 Act:    2 Avg:    1 Max:      33   //////////////////////////////////////// Update for Yocto L5.10.52 2.1.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release for Yocto release L10.52 2.1.0. You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm and git checkout xenomai-5.10.52-2.1.0. Updating: 1, Upgrade Xenomai to v3.2 2, Enable Dovetail instead of ipipe. Copy xenomai-arm to <Yocto folder>/sources/meta-imx/meta-bsp/recipes-kernel, and add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build Image with xenomai enable by command bitake imx-image-multimedia . XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" Notice: If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt", you can build dual kernel version. And If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury", it is single kernel with PREEMPT-RT patch.    
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Hello everyone, this document will explain on how to create and run a custom script for UUU (Universal Update Utility) tool Requirements: I.MX 8M Mini EVK Linux Binary Demo Files - i.MX 8MMini EVK (L5.10.35) UUU Serial console emulator (tera term or putty) Text editor (Notepad++, nano, etc) UUU is a pretty flexible tool since it uses the Fastboot protocol through uboot to flash the desired images, this will make possible to create a custom script to add many uboot commands to customize further the boot settings. In this example I will create a custom script which will flash uboot and Linux rootfs and write a Cortex-M binary to the FAT partition of the eMMC. At the same time I’ll create and modify a set of environmental variables, this variables will have a set of uboot commands that will load to the TCM this same binary before the device starts booting into Linux.   Creating the script For this document I'll be using Notepad++ but any text editor may be used instead, since the scripts used by UUU are written in plain text. The very first line of the script must be the version number which will represent the minimum UUU version that UUU can parse this script. For this case that version is 1.2.39 After it, we will add all standard commands to flash uboot and filesystem into the eMMC. Note: This may be also copied from the uuu.auto script inside the Demo files. Please note that the UUU commands format is PROTOCOL: CMD, for this example we will be using mainly SDP and FB protocols which corresponds to the serial download protocol and Fastboot respectively. For a list of all supported UUU protocols and commands please refer to the UUU documentation here: https://github.com/NXPmicro/mfgtools/releases/download/uuu_1.4.165/UUU.pdf Now add the following commands to the script, this will download and write into eMMC FAT partition, which was created when flashing the .wic image, the Cortex-M binary.   FB: ucmd setenv fastboot_buffer ${loadaddr} FB: download -f hello_world_test.bin FB[-t 20000]: ucmd fatwrite mmc ${emmc_dev}:1 ${fastboot_buffer} hello_world_test.bin ${fastboot_bytes}   #fatwrite write file into a dos filesystem "<interface> <dev[:part]> <addr> <filename> [<bytes> [<offset>]] - write file 'filename' from the address 'addr' in RAM  to 'dev' on 'interface' Note: The Cortex-M binary was named as hello_world_test.bin, but any example name may be used. At this point, in the script we will be using only uboot commands as seen above, in this case was fatwrite. The script will look as following: If the script is run now uboot (imx-boot-imx8mmevk-sd.bin-flash_evk), rootfs (imx-image-multimedia-imx8mmevk.wic) will be flashed and the Cortex-M binary (hello_world_test.bin) written to the FAT partition of the eMMC. To add environmental variables to modify uboot boot settings, i.e. overwrite the dtb variable so the EVK will select the RPMSG dtb, this in case the Cortex-M example needs to be run at the same time as Cortex-A. FB: ucmd setenv fdtfile imx8mm-evk-rpmsg.dtb Next add to the UUU script the set of uboot commands in form of environmental variables that will load to the TCM the Cortex-M binary   FB: ucmd setenv loadm4image "fatload mmc ${emmc_dev}:1 0x48000000 hello_world_test.bin; cp.b 0x48000000 0x7e0000 0x20000" FB: ucmd setenv m4boot "run loadm4image; bootaux 0x48000000" Note: This can be changed to load it to different targets not only TCM, for example DRAM. Now for the set of environmental variable to run when uboot starts booting into Linux we may add it to the variable mmcboot. Also adding the command to save the environmental variables set so the settings persist after reboot, this by adding the following commands to the script:   FB: ucmd setenv mmcboot "run m4boot; $mmcboot" FB: ucmd saveenv The resulting script will be the following: Now just save the script and name it as you see fit, for this example the name will be custom_script.auto.   Running the script To run a UUU script is pretty simple, just make sure that the files used in the script are in the same folder as the script. Windows > .\uuu.exe  custom_script.auto Linux $ sudo ./uuu custom_script.auto   Wait till it finish, turn the board off, set it to boot from eMMC and turn it on, the EVK will boot into Linux automatically and will launch the Cortex-M core automatically. We may also, double check that the environmental variables were written correctly by stopping at uboot and using the printenv command For this test I have used the Prebuilt image which includes sample Cortex-M4 examples for the EVK   further flexibility UUU scripts can be customized even more, for example using macros, so the script can take input arguments so it may be possible to select the uboot, rootfs, Cortex-M binary and dtb to be used when booting, and to be used for other i.MX chips as well. The resulting script will be as following: Note: Here is assumed that the dtb file is already at the FAT partition, if not same procedure may be added as the Cortex-M binary. To run a script which expect to have input arguments is as follow: Windows > .\uuu.exe -b uuu_cortexM_loader.auto imx-boot-imx8mmevk-sd.bin-flash_evk imx-image-multimedia-imx8mmevk.wic hello_world_test.bin imx8mm-evk-rpmsg.dtb Linux $ sudo ./uuu -b uuu_cortexM_loader.auto imx-boot-imx8mmevk-sd.bin-flash_evk imx-image-multimedia-imx8mmevk.wic hello_world_test.bin imx8mm-evk-rpmsg.dtb Please find both UUU scripts attached and feel free to use them. Hope this helps everyone to better understand how this tool works and the capabilities it have.
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Since LF_v5.10.52-2.1.0 crypto_af_alg blackkey demo “caam-decrypt” becomes default in release. You can try it with binary demo release image. The demo is using black key to decrypt data. This document goes more detail based on BSP release document i.MX Linux® User's Guide, Rev. LF5.10.52_2.1.0, 15 October 2021 10.6 crypto_af_alg application support   HW: i.MX8MM EVK SW: LF_v5.10.52-2.1.0_images_IMX8MMEVK binary demo image PC side: 1. generate key and iv by openssl echo 12345 | openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -k - -P -md sha1 -pbkdf2 salt=1982686A7BACEE4D key=D84041EC14BB28543E8545BEB094FE643B5BC1345C31CD576BC708A1559FBD2D iv =F950CACE80F76F0AC00D9C8762B3A5C9 2. encrption by openssl echo "For test caam-decrypt" | openssl enc -e -aes-256-cbc -in - -out test.txt.enc -K D84041EC14BB28543E8545BEB094FE643B5BC1345C31CD576BC708A1559FBD2D -iv F950CACE80F76F0AC00D9C8762B3A5C9 3. decryption by openssl openssl enc -d -aes-256-cbc -in test.txt.enc -out - -K D84041EC14BB28543E8545BEB094FE643B5BC1345C31CD576BC708A1559FBD2D -iv F950CACE80F76F0AC00D9C8762B3A5C9 4. convert key and iv to plian txt for caam-decrypt. echo F950CACE80F76F0AC00D9C8762B3A5C9| xxd -r -p > fromopenssl.iv.txt echo D84041EC14BB28543E8545BEB094FE643B5BC1345C31CD576BC708A1559FBD2D| xxd -r -p > fromopenssl.key.txt 5. prepare data for caam-decrypt cat fromopenssl.iv.txt test.txt.enc > data.caam-decrypt.enc note: the format for with blackkey AES Encrypted file format 16 Octets - Initialization Vector (IV) is an input to encryption algorithm. nn Octets - Encrypted message (for AES-256-CBC, it must be multiple of 16) 6. send fromopenssl.key.txt and data.caam-decrypt.enc to the board on i.MX8MM evk board 1. generate blackkey blob caam-keygen create blackkey ecb -t $(cat fromopenssl.key.txt) 2. delete fromopenssl.key.txt 3. test decryption by caam-decrypt with blackkey caam-decrypt /data/caam/blackkey.bb AES-256-CBC data.caam-decrypt.enc data.caam-decrypt.dec root@imx8mmevk:/# cat data.caam-decrypt.dec For test caam-decrypt  
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Materials: i.MX8M Plus EVK Rev. A USB cable type-C USB cable type-B AC Adapter EA1045CR Micro SD (Optional) 88W8997-based wireless modules Software: Yocto Project Mobaxterm Personal Edition v20.2 Build 4296 This test was done on an i.MX8M Plus EVK with Linux 5.10. Hardknott.   To achieve this, you need to identify your WI-FI module and look for the necessary drivers for that module, in my case I am using the 88W8997 module that comes with the i.MX8M Plus, but you can select any other WI-FI module you want.   In my case I build a basic image on Yocto, following the Yocto users guide, I bitbake just the core boot image that allows me to boot the i.MX8M plus. Deploy your image on an SD or eMMC. These instructions apply to SD and MMC cards although for brevity, and usually, only the SD card is listed. For a Linux image to be able to run, four separate pieces are needed: Linux OS kernel image (zImage/Image) Device tree file (*.dtb) Bootloader image Root file system (i.e., EXT4)   The Yocto Project build creates an SD card image that can be flashed directly. This is the simplest way to load everything needed onto the card with one command. A .wic image contains all four images properly configured for an SD card. The release contains a pre-built .wic image that is built specifically for the one board configuration. It runs the Wayland graphical backend. It does not run on other boards unless U-Boot, the device tree, and rootfs are changed. When more flexibility is desired, the individual components can be loaded separately, and those instructions are included here as well. An SD card can be loaded with the individual components one-by-one or the .wic image can be loaded and the individual parts can be overwritten with specific components. The rootfs on the default .wic image is limited to a bit less than 4 GB, but re-partitioning and re-loading the rootfs can increase that to the size of the card. The rootfs can also be changed to specify the graphical backend that is used. Carry out the following command to copy the SD card image to the SD/MMC card. Change sdx below to match the one used by the SD card. $ sudo dd if=<image name>.wic of=/dev/sdx bs=1M && sync The entire contents of the SD card are replaced. If the SD card is larger than 4 GB, the additional space is not accessible. As this build does not contain the driver integrated we need to add it manually on Linux user space. Follow these instructions to load the driver modules and bring up the 88W8987-based wireless module, more info can be found on the next link: https://www.nxp.com/products/wireless/wi-fi-plus-bluetooth/2-4-5-ghz-dual-band-2x2-wi-fi-5-802-11ac-plus-bluetooth-5-3-solution:88W8997?tab=Documentation_Tab   Use the nano editor included in the pre-built image to edit and verify the module parameters in the wifi_mod_para.conf configuration file.   Add the following lines to the configuration file: PCIE8997 = { cfg80211_wext=0xf wfd_name=p2p max_vir_bss=1 cal_data_cfg=none drv_mode=7 ps_mode=2 auto_ds=2 fw_name=nxp/pcieuart8997_combo_v4.bin } Load the modules in the kernel:   Verify the kernel debug messages in the command output   Verify that the module is now visible to the system:     Now that the module is ready to work, we need to enable it, in my case the Wi-Fi is named mlan0, it could vary on other Linux systems.   In the case you need to see which networks are available you can scan it and select the one you need.   Identify your network and add it to the  WPA supplicant file:     Associate the Wi-Fi with config:   Check if you have right SSID associated:   Use DHPC to get the IP   Ping any public site you know to check the network.   In the case you have a Temporary failure in name resolution you will need to change the default DNS that was assigned by DHCP:     Modify /etc/resolv.conf file and add the DNS of your preference, for my case I add the one that uses Google, as they have access to the most common web pages.   And with that should work.    
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