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i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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  Just sharing some experiences during the development and studying.   Although, it appears some hardwares, it focuses on software to speed up your developing on your  hardware.     杂记共享一下在开发和学习过程中的经验。    虽然涉及一些硬件,但其本身关注软件,希望这些能加速您在自己硬件上的开发。   02/07/2024 i.MX8X security overview and AHAB deep dive i.MX8X security overview and AHAB deep dive - NXP Community   11/23/2023 “Standalone” Compile Device Tree https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/Standalone-Compile-Device-Tree/ta-p/1762373     10/26/2023 Linux Dynamic Debug https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/Linux-Dynamic-Debug/ta-p/1746611   08/10/2023 u-boot environment preset for sdcard mirror u-boot environment preset for sdcard mirror - NXP Community   06/06/2023 all(bootloader, device tree, Linux kernel, rootfs) in spi nor demo imx8qxpc0 mek all(bootloader, device tree, Linux kernel, rootfs)... - NXP Community     09/26/2022 parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing - NXP Community   Provide  run under windows   09/16/2022   create sdcard mirror under windows create sdcard mirror under windows - NXP Community     08/03/2022   i.MX8MM SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MM-SDCARD-Secondary-Boot-Demo/ta-p/1500011     02/16/2022 mx8_ddr_stress_test without UI   https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/mx8-ddr-stress-test-without-UI/ta-p/1414090   12/23/2021 i.MX8 i.MX8X Board Reset https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8-i-MX8X-Board-Reset/ta-p/1391130       12/21/2021 regulator userspace-consumer https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/regulator-userspace-consumer/ta-p/1389948     11/24/2021 crypto af_alg blackkey demo crypto af_alg blackkey demo - NXP Community   09/28/2021 u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) - NXP Community     08/17/2021 gpio-poweroff demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/gpio-poweroff-demo/ta-p/1324306         08/04/2021 How to use gpio-hog demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/How-to-use-gpio-hog-demo/ta-p/1317709       07/14/2021 SWUpdate OTA i.MX8MM EVK / i.MX8QXP MEK https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/SWUpdate-OTA-i-MX8MM-EVK-i-MX8QXP-MEK/ta-p/1307416     04/07/2021 i.MX8QXP eMMC Secondary Boot https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/i-MX8QXP-eMMC-Secondary-Boot/ba-p/1257704#M45       03/25/2021 sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition from A core side sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition fr... - NXP Community     03/17/2021 How to Changei.MX8X MEK+Base Board  Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8X-MEK-Base-Board-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1246779#M43     03/16/2021 How to Change i.MX8MM evk Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8MM-evk-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1243938#M40       05/06/2020 Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's environment variables Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's env... - NXP Community     03/30/2020 i.MX6 DDR calibration/stress for Mass Production https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-346065     03/25/2020 parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345998     02/17/2020 Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground      01/15/2020 How to add  iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup How to add iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup    01/09/2020 Understand iMX8QX Hardware Partitioning By Making M4 Hello world Running Correctly https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345359   09/29/2019 Docker On i.MX6UL With Ubuntu16.04 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344462   09/25/2019 Docker On i.MX8MM With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344473 Docker On i.MX8QXP With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344474     08/28/2019 eMMC5.0 vs eMMC5.1 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344265     05/24/2019 How to upgrade  Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU How to upgrade Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU     04/12/2019 eMMC RPMB Enhance and GP https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343116   04/04/2019 How to Dump a GPT SDCard Mirror(Android O SDCard Mirror) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343079   04/04/2019 i.MX Create Android SDCard Mirror https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343078   04/02/2019: i.MX Linux Binary_Demo Files Tips  https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343075   04/02/2019:       Update Set fast boot        eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf   02/28/2019: imx_builder --- standalone build without Yocto https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-342702   08/10/2018: i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG update    Update slide CMA Arrangement Consideration i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_08102018.pdf   07/26/2018 Understand ML With Simplest Code https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341099     04/23/2018:     i.MX8M Standalone Build     i.MX8M Standalone Build.pdf     04/13/2018:      i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG  update            Add slide CMA Arrangement  Consideration     i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_04132018.pdf   09/05/2017:       Update eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 09/01/2017:       eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 08/30/2017:     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display(For i.MX6DQ/DLS)     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display.pdf 08/27/2017:  L3.14.28 Ottbox Porting Notes:         L3.14.28_Ottbox_Porting_Notes-20150805-2.pdf MFGTool Uboot Share With the Normal Run One:        MFGTool_Uboot_share_with_NormalRun_sourceCode.pdf Mass Production with programmer        Mass_Production_with_NAND_programmer.pdf        Mass_Production_with_emmc_programmer.pdf AndroidSDCARDMirrorCreator https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-329596 L3.10.53 PianoPI Porting Note        L3.10.53_PianoPI_PortingNote_151102.pdf Audio Codec WM8960 Porting L3.10.53 PianoPI        AudioCodec_WM8960_Porting_L3.10.53_PianoPI_151012.pdf TouchScreen PianoPI Porting Note         TouchScreen_PianoPI_PortingNote_151103.pdf Accessing GPIO From UserSpace        Accessing_GPIO_From_UserSpace.pdf        https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343344 FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX        FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX.pdf i.MX6SX M4 fastup        i.MX6SX M4 fastup.pdf i.MX6 SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo        i.MX6_SDCARD_Secondary_Boot_Demo.pdf i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG        i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_10082016.pdf Security        Security03172017.pdf    NOT related to i.MX, only a short memo
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Dynamic debug is designed to allow you to dynamically at runtime  enable/disable  kernel code to obtain additional kernel information. Currently, if ``CONFIG_DYNAMIC_DEBUG`` is set, then all ``pr_debug()``/``dev_dbg()`` and ``print_hex_dump_debug()``/``print_hex_dump_bytes()`` calls can be dynamically enabled per-callsite.    
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Symptoms   Trying to initialize a repo, for example:  $repo init -u https://github.com/nxp-imx/imx-manifest -b imx-linux-mickledore -m imx-6.1.36-2.1.0.xml we have the below log: File "/home/username/bin/repo", line 51 def print(self, *args, **kwargs): ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax   Workaround (1)   The first workaround consist in change the python alternatives (caused when you have installed two or more python versions). NOTE: in my case, the python version that i want to change as first priority is python3.8 $sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python3.8 1   Then we run: $sudo update-alternatives --config python    To verify if your python priority was changed successfully try: $python --version   You should see the version configured as priority number 1.     Workaround (2)   The workaround is very simple, only we need modify the repo file $ nano ~/bin/repo   and we will change the python interpreter in the first line (from python to python3): ORIGINAL FILE   EDITED FILE   After to do this change, repo will works fine again.     I hope this can helps to you!   Best regards.
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Hello there. Here is a good way to use U-boot in an efficient way with custom scripts. The bootscript is an script that is automatically executed when the boot loader starts, and before the OS auto boot process. The bootscript allows the user to execute a set of predefined U-Boot commands automatically before proceeding with normal OS boot. This is especially useful for production environments and targets which don’t have an available serial port for showing the U-Boot monitor. This information can be find in U-Boot Reference Manual.   I will take the example load a binary file in CORTEX M4 of IMX8MM-EVK. In my case, I have the binary file in MMC 2:1 called gpio.bin and I will skip those steps because that is not the goal.   First, you need the u-boot-tools installed in your Linux machine: sudo apt install u-boot-tools   That package provide to us the tool mkimage to convert a text file (.src, .txt) file to a bootscript file for U-Boot.   Now, create your custom script, in this case a simple script for load binary file in Cortex M4: nano mycustomscript.scr  and write your U-Boot commands: fatload mmc 2:1 0x80000000 gpio.bin cp.b 0x80000000 0x7e0000 0x10000 bootaux 0x7e0000   Now we can convert the text file to bootscript with mkimage. Syntax: mkimage -T script -n "Bootscript" -C none -d <input_file> <output_file> mkimage -T script -n "Bootscript" -C none -d mycustomscript.scr LCM4-bootscript   This will create a file called LCM4-bootscript (Or as your called it).   A way to load this bootscript file to U-Boot is using the UUU tool, in U-Boot set the device in fastboot with command: u-boot=> fastboot 0 Then in linux with the board connected through USB to PC run the command: sudo uuu -b fat_write LCM4-bootscript mmc 2:1 LCM4-bootscript   Now we have our bootscript in U-Boot in MMC 2:1.   Finally, we can run the bootscript in U-Boot: u-boot=> load mmc 2:1 ${loadaddr} LCM4-bootscript 158 bytes read in 2 ms (77.1 KiB/s) u-boot=> source ${loadaddr} ## Executing script at 40400000 6656 bytes read in 5 ms (1.3 MiB/s) ## No elf image at address 0x007e0000 ## Starting auxiliary core stack = 0x20020000, pc = 0x1FFE02CD...   And the Cortex M4 booted successfully:    I hope this can helps to you.   Best regards.   Salas.  
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This document intends to provide an overview of the i.MX8 Boot process and walk you through the process of creating a bootable image.   Boot process Coming out of a reset state the i.MX8 ROM (firmware that is stored in non-volatile memory of the i.MX8) reads the boot mode pins to determine the boot media/device that will be used. The i.MX8 can boot out of the following boot devices: eMMC/SD card FlexSPI Flash NAND Serial Download Protocol (USB) - This is used in manufacturing mode to bring-up a board by downloading an image to RAM and then flashing the on-board boot device.   The following table indicates the available options on a i.MX8QXP, the i.MX8 reads the boot mode pads and based in the configuration selects the desired boot device.   Once the boot device has been identified, ROM configures the boot media and attempts to read the image from a predefined address in the boot device, the following table shows the addresses where the image is expected to be on different boot devices. ROM loads data from the predefined addresses above (depending on the selected boot device) to the System Controller Unit (SCU) internal memory (tightly coupled memory) and parses it to find the image container. It can also boot by downloading an image through USB.   The image container has all the information needed to load all the images to the system, the first images that get loaded are the System Controller Firmware (SCFW) and Security Controller Firmware (SECO). The SECO FW needs to be loaded to refresh the watchdog timer (kick the dog) in the device, if the SECO FW is not loaded before the watchdog expires the device will reset, this usually happens when the device fails to fetch a valid image from the boot media.   Once the SCFW is loaded, ROM jumps to it and starts executing it. The SCFW then initializes the DDR and starts loading the images for the Cortex-M4 (optional) and the Cortex-A cores (optional). Once the images are loaded to their destination memory the SCFW boots the cores and sets them in their start address.   Creating a bootable image As a recap a bootable image is comprised of as minimum the System Controller Firmware and the Security Controller Firmware, optionally it can contain images for the Cortex M4 cores (if more than one available as in the case of QM devices) and Cortex A cores. It is possible to boot an image that only contains the SCFW and SECO FW, this could be useful in the first stages of porting the SCFW to the target board. It is also possible to boot an image with only the Cortex-M4 image (baremetal, FreeRTOS, AutoSAR...), only the Cortex-A image (U-boot or any bootloader) or both Cortex-M4 and Cortex-A images.   Mkimage tool The tool in charge of merging all these images and creating a bootable image for the i.MX8 is called mkimage, and can be obtained in source form in the following repository: https://github.com/nxp-imx/imx-mkimage mkimage is only supported in Linux So the first step is to clone the mkimage repository into our machine and checkout the latest branch, at the time of writing this document the latest release is 4.14.98_02: git clone https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-mkimage cd imx-mkimage git checkout imx_4.14.98_2.0.0_ga‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ You should now be able to see the following folders:   Getting the SCFW Now that you have the mkimage tool you need some actual images to work with, if you are using a custom board you might need to port the SCFW and DDR configuration files for it (depending on how close it follows NXP's reference board).   The following is a compendium of documents on the basics of the SCFW and how to build it from scratch you can go there if you need help getting started with the porting process: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-342654   If you are trying this on one of NXP's reference board you can use a pre-built SCFW binary, this can be obtained through the building process of the Yocto project or by downloading the porting kit and following these steps: Dowload SCFW binaries for release 4.14.98_02 here. chmod a+x imx-sc-firmware-1.2.bin ./imx-sc-firmware-1.2.bin‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ You will prompted to accept a license agreement and after that the binaries will be extracted:   Getting the SECO FW The Security Controller Firmware is only distributed in binary form and can be obtained from the NXP website. Download SECO FW binaries for release 4.14.98_02 here. chmod a+x firmware-imx-8.1.bin ./firmware-imx-8.1.bin‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ You will prompted to accept a license agreement and after that the binaries will be extracted: The SECO FW is under firmware/seco mx8qm-ahab-container.img -----> SECO FW for QM devices mx8qx-ahab-container.img ------> SECO FW for QXP devices   Getting an image for the Cortex-M4 The image for the Cortex-M4 can be generated using the SDK: https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/en/select Just select the device you are working with and click Build MCUXpresso SDK, then you will prompted to select your IDE and host. Click on Download SDK and a compressed file containing the SDK will be dowloaded to your computer. Now you only need to uncompress the file and follow the steps in the getting started document to generate the image.  The getting started document includes steps to setup the toolchain and build an image for the M4. An M4 binary for the QM and QXP MEKs is also attached in this document, the example outputs a hello world message on the M4 terminal. Getting an image for the Cortex-A  The bootloader for the Cortex-A cores can be obtained through the Yocto BSP: The steps on generating the image for the 4.14.98 release can be found here: https://www.nxp.com/webapp/Download?colCode=imx-yocto-L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga    Some more details on the Yocto BSP can be found here: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-94849   All the required binaries to create a bootable image for the Cortex-A cores on the MEK platforms are attached here.   Building a bootable image Once all the required pieces have been built/obtained, the bootable image can be created. The SCFW, SECO FW and respective Cortex-M4/A images need to be copied to the folder for the target device, i.e. if you are building an image for an i.MX8QX variant copy the binaries for that variant to its folder:   Here is a list of the required files to build a bootable image: scfw_tcm.bin -------------------------------------------- System Controller Firmware binary for the target board mx8qm(qx)-ahab-container.image ---------------- Security Controller Firmware for the QM or QXP variants bl31.bin --------------------------------------------------- ARM Trusted Firmware binary (Required if using u-boot with ATF) Only needed to create Cortex-A image with u-boot u-boot.bin ------------------------------------------------ U-boot binary (optional) m4_image ----------------------------------------------- M4 binary image, the QM variant has 2 Cortex-M4s and in this case to M4 binaries might be required (optional)   Once the required binaries have been copied to the desired variant folder (QXP or QM in this example), you are ready to start building some images.   All the targets for building different images are defined on the soc.mak file contained in each folder, this file contains different examples for creating a lot of the supported bootable images.   Creating a SCFW only image The target used to create a SCFW only image is flash_b0_scfw and it is defined under the soc.mak file of each variant. To invoke this target for QXP from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QX flash_b0_scfw‍‍‍ To invoke this target for QM from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QM flash_b0_scfw‍‍‍   The target definition for flash_b0_scfw can be seen below. Definition for QXP: flash_scfw flash_b0_scfw: $(MKIMG) mx8qx-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QX -rev B0 -dcd skip -append mx8qx-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -out flash.bin ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Definition for QM: flash_b0_scfw: $(MKIMG) mx8qm-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QM -rev B0 -dcd skip -append mx8qm-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -out flash.bin‍‍‍‍‍‍   Creating a Cortex-A image only The target used to create a Cortex-A image only is called flash_b0. To invoke this target for QXP from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QX flash_b0 ‍‍‍ To invoke this target for QM from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QM flash_b0‍ ‍‍‍ The target definition for flash_b0 can be seen below. Definition for QXP:   flash flash_b0: $(MKIMG) mx8qx-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin u-boot-atf.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QX -rev B0 -append mx8qx-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -ap u-boot-atf.bin a35 0x80000000 -out flash.bin‍‍‍‍ Definition for QM:   flash_b0: $(MKIMG) mx8qm-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin u-boot-atf.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QM -rev B0 -append mx8qm-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -ap u-boot-atf.bin a53 0x80000000 -out flash.bin‍‍‍‍   Creating a Cortex-M4 image only The target used to create a Cortex-m4 image only is called flash_b0_cm4 on QXP and QM has different targets since there are two M4s available in the system. To invoke this target for QXP from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QX flash_b0_cm4‍‍ To invoke this target for QM from the imx-mkimage directory: // For Cortex-M4_0 only make SOC=iMX8QM flash_b0‍_cm4‍_0 // For Cortex-M4_1 only make SOC=iMX8QM flash_b0‍_cm4‍_1 // For both Cortex-M4_0 and Cortex-M4_1 make SOC=iMX8QM flash_b0‍_m4‍s_tcm ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍   The target definition for flash_b0_cm4 can be seen below. Definition for QXP: flash_cm4 flash_b0_cm4: $(MKIMG) mx8qx-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin m4_image.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QX -rev B0 -append mx8qx-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -p1 -m4 m4_image.bin 0 0x34FE0000 -out flash.bin‍‍‍‍ Definitions for QM: flash_b0_cm4_0: $(MKIMG) mx8qm-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin m4_image.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QM -rev B0 -dcd skip -append mx8qm-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -p1 -m4 m4_image.bin 0 0x34FE0000 -out flash.bin flash_b0_cm4_1: $(MKIMG) mx8qm-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin m4_image.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QM -rev B0 -dcd skip -append mx8qm-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -p1 -m4 m4_image.bin 1 0x38FE0000 -out flash.bin flash_b0_m4s_tcm: $(MKIMG) mx8qm-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin m40_tcm.bin m41_tcm.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QM -rev B0 -dcd skip -append mx8qm-ahab-container.img -c -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -p1 -m4 m40_tcm.bin 0 0x34FE0000 -m4 m41_tcm.bin 1 0x38FE0000 -out flash.bin‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍   The examples above are for M4 images booting from TCM, the M4 is capable of booting and executing from DDR and it is also able to XIP (execute in place) from SPI memory, for examples on this targets please look at the soc.mak for the desired variant. Creating an image with both Cortex-A and Cortex-M4 images The target used to create an image with software for all the cores is called flash_linux_m4. To invoke this target for QXP from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QX flash_linux_m4‍ ‍ To invoke this target for QM from the imx-mkimage directory: make SOC=iMX8QM flash_linux_m4‍ ‍ The target definition for flash_linux_m4 can be seen below. Definition for QXP: flash_linux_m4: $(MKIMG) mx8qx-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin u-boot-atf.bin m4_image.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QX -rev B0 -append mx8qx-ahab-container.img -c -flags 0x00200000 -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -ap u-boot-atf.bin a35 0x80000000 -p3 -m4 m4_image.bin 0 0x34FE0000 -out flash.bin‍‍   Definition for QM: flash_linux_m4: $(MKIMG) mx8qm-ahab-container.img scfw_tcm.bin u-boot-atf.bin m4_0_image.bin m4_1_image.bin ./$(MKIMG) -soc QM -rev B0 -append mx8qm-ahab-container.img -c -flags 0x00200000 -scfw scfw_tcm.bin -ap u-boot-atf.bin a53 0x80000000 -p3 -m4 m4_0_image.bin 0 0x34FE0000 -p4 -m4 m4_1_image.bin 1 0x38FE0000 -out flash.bin‍‍     Flash image This will create a bootable image named flash.bin, to flash this image to the SD card and boot it on your MEK simply do: sudo dd if=iMX8QX/flash.bin of=/dev/mmcblkX bs=1k seek=32‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ If the desired target is a QM variant change if=iMX8QX... to if=iMX8QM. Then match your SD card device on "of=/dev/mmcblkX" you can see how your SD card enumerates by typing lsblk on your console before and after inserting your SD card. Remember from the information above that the i.MX8 will search for the image at 32k on the SD card, that is why we are flashing it there. For more examples please look at the soc.mak file, it includes examples for different boot media (NAND/QSPI) as well as different configurations and usage.   Additional resources Reference Manual Chapter 5 System Boot SCFW API and Port document imx-mkimage README System Controller Firmware 101 
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This is a simple document for recording some known-how and tips for building up the Windows 10 IoT development environment for i.MX platform. It can only be used as a complement for official document in BSP package (Guide/Release Note/etc.). Applicable for: Windows 10 IoT, i.MX BSP v1.4.1 (date to Nov/2023) Please refer to the PDF attached.
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Information about the transition from the NXP Demo Experience to GoPoint for i.MX Application Processors.
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Usually, device tree source files are not a signal pure dts file. It could include dtsi, dts or C code heads .h files. Need C compiler finish the pre-compile to a pure dts file first. It is integrated inside the like Linux build system(Makefile, etc.). This document shows the original way to compile device tree. This document will show compile device tree under windows.    
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On behalf of Gopise Yuan. This is an update for the DRM framebuffer capture tool I used to share with the team. Some enhancement added. Might be useful for debugging some display related issues.   Some special notes: Behavior of DRM subsystem is different between L4.x and L5.x. For L4.x, you can capture the RGB buffer without any problem. But, there’s no API for YUV (multi-plane) buffer. To capture YUV, need to apply “kernel_0001-drm-Add-getfb2-ioctl_L4.14.98.patch”. For L5.x, mapping/capturing the internal buffer is not allowed by default due to security reason. A simple change in “0001-drm-enable-mapping-of-internal-object-for-debugging_L5.x.patch” can disable this guard. Capture raw data only. RGB and YUV (packed/planar, 420/422) supported. Support de-tile on “Amphion tile” (VPU, NV12 only) and “Super tile” (Vivante GPU). Please use “-t” to enable this. Other tile might not be supported. This is a static linked binary. You can run it on any ARM64 based Linux/Android system in theory (prerequisites in item #1). If you need source code, come to me.   To get more details on how to use it, use “-?” option: DRM screen capture DRM based screen capture program Usage:     ./drmfbcap [OP] [ARG] [OP] OPeration (optional):     -v Show version.     -? Show help information.     -i Show information about target DRM device only (no capture).     -t Perform de-tile for tile format.     -d DRM device to open. [ARG] should contain the path to the device node. Default: '/dev/dri/card0'     -o Output folder. [ARG] should contain the path to the output folder. Default: '.'     -p Specific plane # to capture. [ARG] should contain the plane number. If no '-p' specified, capture all planes   Example:     ./drmfbcap   Capture all planes on default DRM device.     ./drmfbcap -d /dev/dri/controlD64   Capture all planes on '/dev/dri/controlD64' device.     ./drmfbcap -p 44 -t -o /sdcard   Capture plane 44, do de-tile after capture and then output to /sdcard/.   Raw buffer capture will be done for each enabled/target plane and one file for each. Captured file will be saved to './' if not specified. --- By Gopise, 2022/08   Updated_2023_10_16: continuous capture (repeat mode) support with this link: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/DRM-screen-capture-tool/ta-p/1725363
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What is a device tree? The device tree is a data structure that is passed to the Linux kernel to describe the physical devices in a system. Before device trees came into use, the bootloader (for example, U-Boot) had to tell the kernel what machine type it was booting. Moreover, it had to pass other information such as memory size and location, kernel command line, etc. Sometimes, the device tree is confused with the Linux Kernel configuration, but the device tree specifies what devices are available and how they are accessed, not whether the hardware is used. The device tree is a structure composed of nodes and properties: Nodes: The node name is a label used to identify the node. Properties: A node may contain multiple properties arranged with a name and a value. Phandle: Property in one node that contains a pointer to another node. Aliases: The aliases node is an index of other nodes. A device tree is defined in a human-readable device tree syntax text file such as .dts or .dtsi. The machine has one or several .dts files that correspond to different hardware configurations. With these .dts files we can compile them into a device tree binary (.dtb) blobs that can either be attached to the kernel binary (for legacy compatibility) or, as is more commonly done, passed to the kernel by a bootloader like U-Boot. What is Devshell? The Devshell is a terminal shell that runs in the same context as the BitBake task engine. It is possible to run Devshell directly or it may spawn automatically. The advantage of this tool is that is automatically included when you configure and build a platform project so, you can start using it by installing the packages and following the setup of i.MX Yocto Project User's Guide on section 3 “Host Setup”. Steps: Now, let’s see how to compile your device tree files of i.MX devices using Devshell. On host machine. Modify or make your device tree on the next path: - 64 bits. ~/imx-yocto-bsp/<build directory>/tmp/work-shared/<machine>/kernel-source/arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale - 32 bits. ~/imx-yocto-bsp/<build directory>/tmp/work-shared/<machine>/kernel-source/arch/arm/boot/dts To compile, it is needed to prepare the environment as is mentioned on i.MX Yocto Project User's Guide on section 5.1 “Build Configurations”. $ cd ~/imx-yocto-bsp $ DISTRO=fsl-imx-xwayland MACHINE=<machine> source imx-setup-release.sh -b <build directory> $ bitbake -c devshell virtual/kernel (it will open a new window) On Devshell window. $ make dtbs (after finished, close the Devshell window) On host machine. $ bitbake -c compile -f virtual/kernel $ bitbake -c deploy -f virtual/kernel This process will compile all the device tree files linked to the machine declared on setup environment and your device tree files will be deployed on the next path: ~/imx-yocto-bsp/<build directory>/tmp/deploy/images/<machine> I hope this article will be helpful. Best regards. Jorge.
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Customer is asking high-capacity external storage(for example >64GB) support on i.MX BSP, ext4 is ok for HC storage, but it can’t be supported by Windows. Pls find NFTS and exFAT support status on Linux BSP below: Updated test result on L5.4.70.2.3.0 and L6.1.22: L5.4.70.2.3.0 1.You can enable ntfs support in kernel config as below,  ntfs can be mounted normally, but you can only modify existing file content in disk, you can’t create/delete/rename file on disk. > File systems > DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems   Log: root@imx8mpevk:~# mount -t ntfs /dev/sda1 /mnt/fat/ [  662.732869] ntfs: volume version 3.1. root@imx8mpevk:~# cp ntfs-3g /mnt/fat/ cp: cannot create regular file '/mnt/fat/ntfs-3g': Permission denied root@imx8mpevk:~# ls /mnt/fat/ 111.png  Image_org  System Volume Information  gpuinfo.sh root@imx8mpevk:~# vi /mnt/fat/gpuinfo.sh root@imx8mpevk:~# umount /mnt/fat/ root@imx8mpevk:~# ntfs file system can be accessed via ntfs-3g in user space as below //build: wget https://tuxera.com/opensource/ntfs-3g_ntfsprogs-2017.3.23.tgz tar zxvf ntfs-3g_ntfsprogs-2017.3.23.tgz cd ntfs-3g_ntfsprogs-2017.3.23/ source ../../sdk/environment-setup-aarch64-poky-linux   ./configure --host=aarch64-linux --build=aarch64-poky-linux --disable-shared --enable-static   make   ls /src/ntfs-3g   //put it into rootfs cp ntfs-3g /bin   //test log: root@imx8mpevk:/# [ 1058.724471] usb 1-1: USB disconnect, device number 4 [ 1062.058613] usb 1-1: new high-speed USB device number 5 using xhci-hcd [ 1062.214029] usb-storage 1-1:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected [ 1062.220986] scsi host0: usb-storage 1-1:1.0 [ 1063.235871] scsi 0:0:0:0: Direct-Access     VendorCo ProductCode      2.00 PQ: 0 ANSI: 4 [ 1063.246185] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 15728640 512-byte logical blocks: (8.05 GB/7.50 GiB) [ 1063.254023] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write Protect is off [ 1063.259164] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] No Caching mode page found [ 1063.264540] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Assuming drive cache: write through [ 1063.296946]  sda: sda1 [ 1063.300860] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Attached SCSI removable disk   root@imx8mpevk:/# ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/fat/ root@imx8mpevk:/# ls /mnt/fat/ README  System Volume Information  gpu.sh  gpuinfo.sh root@imx8mpevk:/# cp /unit_tests/memtool /mnt/fat/ root@imx8mpevk:/# umount /mnt/fat/ root@imx8mpevk:/# ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/fat/ root@imx8mpevk:/# ls /mnt/fat/ README  System Volume Information  gpu.sh  gpuinfo.sh  memtool root@imx8mpevk:/#   3.exFAT is not supported on this BSP..   L6.1.22(you can check it on L5.15 and above, should be the same) You can enable ntfs support in kernel config as below, full features can be supported. > File systems > DOS/FAT/EXFAT/NT Filesystems   Pls use ‘-t ntfs3’ during mounting, otherwise it will be mounted as ‘read-only’ Log: root@imx8ulpevk:~# mount -t ntfs3 /dev/sda1 /mnt/fat/ root@imx8ulpevk:~# ls /mnt/fat/ 111.png   Image_org  'System Volume Information' root@imx8ulpevk:~# root@imx8ulpevk:~# cp gpuinfo.sh /mnt/fat/ root@imx8ulpevk:~# umount /mnt/fat/ root@imx8ulpevk:~# root@imx8ulpevk:~# mount -t ntfs3 /dev/sda1 /mnt/fat/ root@imx8ulpevk:~# ls /mnt/fat/ 111.png   Image_org  'System Volume Information'   gpuinfo.sh root@imx8ulpevk:~#   exFAT has been supported in L6.1.22. > File systems > DOS/FAT/EXFAT/NT Filesystems   /dev/sda1 on /run/media/sda1 type exfat (rw,relatime,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,iocharset=utf8,errors=remount-ro) root@imx8ulpevk:~# ls /run/media/sda1 'Certificate of Completion.pdf'             carlife.MP4 Image_org                                  example.tflite L5.4.70_2.3.0                              mx8mp_vpu.txt NXP-5G.mp4                                 sd.mp4 'System Volume Information'                 vela.ini android_p9.0.0_2.1.0-auto-ga_image_8qmek root@imx8ulpevk:~# ls Image_org  gpuinfo.sh root@imx8ulpevk:~# cp gpuinfo.sh /run/media/sda1/ root@imx8ulpevk:~# umount /run/media/sda1 root@imx8ulpevk:~#
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Hello everyone! In this quick example its focused on how to customize uboot code to generate an uboot image with a silent console so its speed up the flash and boot time, this may provide helpful for customers who have a bigger images or just want to have a silent console. Note: this should not be enabled if the image is still being under test, since this will disable all communication with the debug terminal and there won't be boot messages. Requirements: I.MX 8M Nano DDR4 EVK i.MX 8M Nano EVK Prebuilt image (6.1.1-1.0.0) UUU tool First clone the code from the uboot repository: $ git clone https://github.com/nxp-imx/uboot-imx -b lf-6.1.1-1.0.0 $ cd uboot-imx After we get the code, then proceed to enable the silent console in the uboot defconfig: $ nano configs/imx8mn_ddr4_evk_defconfig CONFIG_SILENT_CONSOLE=y CONFIG_SILENT_U_BOOT_ONLY=y For this to actually work we need to create the silent environmental variable and give it a value different from "0": $ nano include/configs/imx8mn_evk.h "silent=1\0"      \ As specified in our Linux porting guide: Generate an SDK from the Yocto Project build environment with the following command. To set up the Yocto Project build environment, follow the steps in the i.MX Yocto Project User's Guide (IMXLXYOCTOUG). In the following command, set Target-Machine to the machine you are building for. See Section "Build configurations" in the i.MX Yocto Project User's Guide (IMXLXYOCTOUG) Set up the host terminal window toolchain environment: $ source/opt/fsl-imx-xwayland/6.1.1/environment-setup-aarch64-poky-linux $ export ARCH=arm64 Build uboot binary: $ make distclean $ make imx8mn_ddr4_evk_defconfig $ make Build ARM Trusted Firmware (ATF) $ cd .. $ git clone https://github.com/nxp-imx/imx-atf -b lf-6.1.1-1.0.0 $ cd imx-atf/ $ make PLAT=imx8mn bl31 In case you get the error aarch64-poky-linux-ld.bfd: unrecognized option '-Wl,-O1' $ unset LDFLAGS Download the DDR training & HDMI binaries $ cd .. $ mkdir firmware-imx $ cd firmware-imx $ wget https://www.nxp.com/lgfiles/NMG/MAD/YOCTO/firmware-imx-8.19.bin $ chmod a+x firmware-imx-8.19.bin $ ./firmware-imx-8.19.bin Accept EULA and the firmware will be deployed. Download imx-mkimage and build the boot image $ cd .. $ git clone https://github.com/nxp-imx/imx-mkimage -b lf-6.1.1-1.0.0 $ cd imx-mkimage $ cp ../uboot-imx/spl/u-boot-spl.bin iMX8M/ $ cp ../uboot-imx/u-boot-nodtb.bin iMX8M/ $ cp ../uboot-imx/arch/arm/dts/imx8mn-ddr4-evk.dtb iMX8M/ $ cp ../imx-atf/build/imx8mn/release/bl31.bin iMX8M/ $ cp ../firmware-imx/firmware-imx-8.19/firmware/ddr/synopsys/ddr4_* iMX8M/ $ cp ../uboot-imx/tools/mkimage iMX8M/mkimage_uboot $ make SOC=iMX8MN flash_ddr4_evk After this we can download our uboot image to our board, we can either use the uboot image for boot or for flashing purpose only. We can compare the time it takes using UUU with a standard pre-built image uuu -V -b emmc_all imx-boot-imx8mn-ddr4-evk-sd.bin-flash_ddr4_evk imx-image-full-imx8mnevk.wic It takes 485.5 seconds using normal uboot with debug console enabled. uuu -V -b emmc_all flash.bin imx-image-full-imx8mnevk.wic It takes 477.5 seconds using silent uboot console. Even if the speed is not greatly improved (~8 seconds), in larger files it could help to speed up flashing, even if wants to have the console silent is a good option. Hope everyone finds this useful! For any question regarding this document, please create a community thread and tag me if needed. Saludos/Regards, Aldo.
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  Introduction   Prior to 6.1.22_2.0.0 BSP release, Bluetooth interface are based on the tty line discipline framework, so we need to use hciattach tool to enable it in the user space. From 6.1.22_2.0.0 BSP, the nxp bluetooth driver no longer needs the help of the userspace hciattach tool, and the tty port bound by bluetooth also won't be exported to the user space, so you cannot find the corresponding tty device anymore. So, you won't see the (/dev/ttymxcX), for the Bluetooth interface. All jobs has been done in the new NXP Bluetooth driver. New Method   The new NXP Bluetooth UART Driver is based on a server driver for the NXP BT serial protocol, which can enable the built-in Bluetooth device inside an NXP BT chip. This driver has a Power Save feature that will put the chip into a sleep state whenever there is no activity for 2000ms and will be woken up when any activity is to be initiated over UART.  Device Tree support The new BT framework requires adding a "bluetooth" sub node with a device compatibility string to the attached UART node in the dts file &uart1 { bluetooth { compatibility = "nxp,88w8987-bt"; fw-init-baudrate = <3000000>; #Optional. Default is considered 115200 if this parameter not defined. }; };   Note: The parameter ‘compatibility = “nxp,88w8987-bt”’ will use for 88W8987, IW416, 88Q9098, IW612 chipsets and need to change for 88W8997 with parameter ‘compatibility = “nxp,88w8997-bt”’.   Note: ’fw-init-baudrate’ parameter depends on the module vendor. The Murata and Azuere wifi modules support in BSP release uses the default value -- 115200. We strongly recommend looking at the module vendor-specific baud rate parameter. Note: For the old 88Q9098 Murata 1XL module that uses the 3Mbps by default, please add the fw-init-baudrate = <3000000> property in dts files to make it work. Enable Guide   Use wifi interface to load combo (wifi & bt) firmware and enable BT Need to load wifi driver first, then load the BT driver, otherwise, BT driver suspend/resume test will fail. This is a HW limitation, since NXP wifi and BT module use the same power control pin(W_DISABLE1#), if we don't load the wifi driver, SDIO bus will power down the wifi chip during suspend resume, which may cause the BT chip also been powered down and cannot work after resume back. So we need to load the wifi driver to make sure SDIO bus won't power down the BT chip to make sure BT functions can work during suspend resume. modprobe moal mod_para=nxp/wifi_mod_para.conf modprobe btnxpuart or insmod mlan.ko insmod moal.ko mod_para=nxp/wifi_mod_para.conf insmod btnxpuart   Unload UART Driver modprobe moal Make sure run hciconfig hci0 up or hciconfig hci0 reset or bluetootctl power on before unload btnxpuart driver. If we don't open hci0 interface, the driver cannot send change to 115200 baud rate command to BT chip, which causes the host and BT chip baud rate mismatch, the host still uses 115200bps talk to the BT chip which now use 3Mbps, it cannot work anymore. So we need to make sure open the hci0 interface before unload btnxpuart driver.   mod_para=nxp/wifi_mod_para.conf modprobe btnxpuart sleep 3 hciconfig hci0 up #Note: Need to up hci interface before unload the BT module hcitool -i hci0 cmd 3F 23 02 00 00 modprobe -r btnxpuart modprobe -r moal sleep 3​ For better reference: Please find the I.MX 8MQ Linux getting started user guide, UM11483, Chapter "7.1 Bring-up using NXP Bluetooth UART driver"  Bluetooth Deep Sleep Feature App Note AN13920, Chapter 6 Load NXP UART driver module NOTE: Please do not run the power save feature for Murata IW612 2EL Module Regards, Mario
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In some cases, such as mass production or preparing a demo. We need u-boot environment stored in demo sdcard mirror image.  Here is a way: HW:  i.MX8MP evk SW:  LF_v5.15.52-2.1.0_images_IMX8MPEVK.zip The idea is to use fw_setenv to set the sdcard mirror as the operation on a real emmc/sdcard. Add test=ABCD in u-boot-initial-env for test purpose. And use fw_printenv to check and use hexdump to double confirm it. The uboot env is already written into sdcard mirror(imx-image-multimedia-imx8mpevk.wic). All those operations are on the host x86/x64 PC. ./fw_setenv -c fw_env.config -f u-boot-initial-env Environment WRONG, copy 0 Cannot read environment, using default ./fw_printenv -c fw_env.config Environment OK, copy 0 jh_root_dtb=imx8mp-evk-root.dtb loadbootscript=fatload mmc ${mmcdev}:${mmcpart} ${loadaddr} ${bsp_script}; mmc_boot=if mmc dev ${devnum}; then devtype=mmc; run scan_dev_for_boot_part; fi arch=arm baudrate=115200 ...... ...... ...... splashimage=0x50000000 test=ABCD usb_boot=usb start; if usb dev ${devnum}; then devtype=usb; run scan_dev_for_boot_part; fi vendor=freescale hexdump -s 0x400000 -n 2000 -C imx-image-multimedia-imx8mpevk.wic 00400000 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 |................| hexdump -s 0x400000 -n 10000 -C imx-image-multimedia-imx8mpevk.wic 00400000 5f a4 9b 97 20 6a 68 5f 72 6f 6f 74 5f 64 74 62 |_... jh_root_dtb| 00400010 3d 69 6d 78 38 6d 70 2d 65 76 6b 2d 72 6f 6f 74 |=imx8mp-evk-root| 00400020 2e 64 74 62 00 20 6c 6f 61 64 62 6f 6f 74 73 63 |.dtb. loadbootsc| 00400030 72 69 70 74 3d 66 61 74 6c 6f 61 64 20 6d 6d 63 |ript=fatload mmc| 00400040 20 24 7b 6d 6d 63 64 65 76 7d 3a 24 7b 6d 6d 63 | ${mmcdev}:${mmc| 00400050 70 61 72 74 7d 20 24 7b 6c 6f 61 64 61 64 64 72 |part} ${loadaddr| 00400060 7d 20 24 7b 62 73 70 5f 73 63 72 69 70 74 7d 3b |} ${bsp_script};| 00400070 00 20 6d 6d 63 5f 62 6f 6f 74 3d 69 66 20 6d 6d |. mmc_boot=if mm| ...... ...... ...... 00401390 76 3d 31 00 73 6f 63 3d 69 6d 78 38 6d 00 73 70 |v=1.soc=imx8m.sp| 004013a0 6c 61 73 68 69 6d 61 67 65 3d 30 78 35 30 30 30 |lashimage=0x5000| 004013b0 30 30 30 30 00 74 65 73 74 3d 41 42 43 44 00 75 |0000.test=ABCD.u| 004013c0 73 62 5f 62 6f 6f 74 3d 75 73 62 20 73 74 61 72 |sb_boot=usb star| 004013d0 74 3b 20 69 66 20 75 73 62 20 64 65 76 20 24 7b |t; if usb dev ${| 004013e0 64 65 76 6e 75 6d 7d 3b 20 74 68 65 6e 20 64 65 |devnum}; then de| flash the sdcard mirror into i.MX8MP evk board emmc to check uuu -b emmc_all imx-boot-imx8mp-lpddr4-evk-sd.bin-flash_evk imx-image-multimedia-imx8mpevk.wic  The first time boot, the enviroment is already there.  How to achieve that: a. fw_setenv/fw_printenv: https://github.com/sbabic/libubootenv.git Note: Please do not use uboot fw_setenv/fw_printenv Compile it on the host x86/x64 PC. It is used on host. b. u-boot-initial-env Under uboot, make u-boot-initial-env Note: Yocto deploys u-boot-initial-env by default c. fw_env.config  imx-image-multimedia-imx8mpevk.wic 0x400000 0x4000 0x400000 0x4000 are from uboot-imx\configs\imx8mp_evk_defconfig CONFIG_ENV_SIZE=0x4000 CONFIG_ENV_OFFSET=0x400000 Now, you can run  ./fw_setenv -c fw_env.config -f u-boot-initial-env
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Environment BSP: L6.1.22_2.0.0​ Platform: i.MX93 Links:  https://github.com/NXP/swupdate-scripts https://github.com/nxp-imx-support/meta-swupdate-imx   The AN13872 provides us the swupdate yocto layer, swupdate-scripts and test steps, but there is still much to add. The purpose of this knowledge base is to provide customized advice. 1.How to port meta-swupdate-imx to any yocto version you want? As meta-swupdate-imx only provide kirkstone version, we can upgrade or degrade it based on this version. We will take L6.1.22_2.0.0​ porting steps as an example. 1.1 Download Yocto layer  cd imx-yocto-bsp/sources git clone https://github.com/sbabic/meta-swupdate.git -b mickledore git clone https://github.com/nxp-imx-support/meta-swupdate-imx.git 1.2 Modify  Yocto layer  imx-yocto-bsp/sources/meta-swupdate-imx/conf/layer.conf   You can find swupdate version in imx-yocto-bsp/sources/meta-swupdate/recipes-support/swupdate/ 1.3 Handle patches in meta-swupdate-imx/recipes-bsp/u-boot/files/ About patchs in sources/meta-swupdate-imx/recipes-bsp/u-boot/files/ and imx-yocto-bsp/sources/meta-swupdate-imx/recipes-support/swupdate/files/, you need use devtool to unpack uboot and swupdate into workspace and add changes manunally for development. CONFIG_ENV_OFFSET_REDUND=CONFIG_ENV_OFFSET+CONFIG_ENV_SIZE   sources/meta-swupdate-imx/recipes-bsp/u-boot/u-boot-imx_%.bbappend 2.How to flash base image? Use uuu or dd command, just like common imx-image-xxx 3.swupdate-scripts porting suggestions 3.1 Partition table You can modify partition table refer the size of images. For different soc, the first offset is different. If you are porting i.MX8MP based on iMX8MM, the offset should be 32K.   3.2 Some errors 3.2.1 This error indicates that you need enlarge size of rootfs. e2fsck 1.45.5 (07-Jan-2020) The filesystem size (according to the superblock) is 887599 blocks The physical size of the device is 768000 blocks Either the superblock or the partition table is likely to be corrupt! Abort<y>?    3.2.2 You need upgrade e2fsck verison. e2fsck 1.46.5 (30-Dec-2021) /home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_assembling/slota/core-image-base-imx93-11x11-lpddr4x- evk.ext4 has unsupported feature(s): FEATURE_C12 e2fsck: Get a newer version of e2fsck! /home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_assembling/slota/core-image-base-imx93-11x11-lpddr4x- evk.ext4: ********** WARNING: Filesystem still has errors ********** resize2fs 1.46.5 (30-Dec-2021) resize2fs: Filesystem has unsupported feature(s) (/home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_ass  solution: wget https://mirrors.edge.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/tytso/e2fsprogs/v1.47.0/e2fsprogs-1.47.0.tar.xz tar -xf e2fsprogs-1.47.0.tar.xz cd e2fsprogs-1.47.0/ ./configure make -j16 sudo make install   3.2.3 mtools /home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_assembling/../utils/utils.sh: line 58: mdir: command not found /home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_assembling/../utils/utils.sh: line 66: mcopy: command not found /home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_assembling/../utils/utils.sh: line 66: mcopy: command not found /home/nxf65025/imx-yocto-bsp/swupdate-scripts/base_image_assembling/../utils/utils.sh: line 68: mdir: command not found solution: sudo apt-get install mtools
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Application Note AN13872 - Enabling SWUpdate on i.MX 6ULL  is available on www.nxp.com    SWUpdate: Embedded Systems become more and more complex. Software for Embedded Systems have new features and fixes can be updated in a reliable way. Most of time, we need OTA(Over-The-Air) to upgrade the system. Like Android has its own update system. Linux also need an update system. SWUpdate project is thought to help to update an embedded system from a storage media or from network. However, it should be mainly considered as a framework, where further protocols or installers (in SWUpdate they are called handlers) can be easily added to the application. Mongoose daemon mode: Mongoose is a daemon mode of SWUpdate that provides a web server, web interface and web application. Mongoose is running on the target board(i.MX8MM EVK/i.MX8QXP MEK).Using Web browser to access it.   Suricatta daemon mode: Suricatta regularly polls a remote server for updates, downloads, and installs them. Thereafter, it reboots the system and reports the update status to the server. The screenshot is SWUpdate scuricatta working with hawkbit server.          
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1.Compile full aosp or only kernel Build full aosp: source build/envsetup.sh lunch evk_8mm-userdebug ./imx-make.sh -j8  Only build kernel: ./imx-make.sh kernel -j8 2.Build GKI locally Download GKI outside of android_build. mkdir gki && cd gki (Make sure folder gki is not inside of ${MY_ANDROID}) repo init -u https://android.googlesource.com/kernel/manifest -b commonandroid13-5.15 repo sync Build GKI locally. BUILD_CONFIG=common/build.config.gki.aarch64 build/build.sh 3. Export symbols After building GKI locally, you can copy linux-imx from /vendor/nxp-opensource/kernel_imx into common. cd common rm -r ./* cp ${MY_ANDROID}/vendor/nxp-opensource/kernel_imx/* ./ ln -s ${MY_ANDROID}/vendor/nxp-opensource/verisilicon_sw_isp_vvcam verisilicon_sw_isp_vvcam ln -s ${MY_ANDROID}/vendor/nxp-opensource/nxp-mwifiex nxp-mwifiex  Build GKI about i.MX: BUILD_FOR_GKI=yes BUILD_CONFIG=common/build.config.imx EXT_MODULES_MAKEFILE="verisilicon_sw_isp_vvcam/vvcam/v4l2/Kbuild" EXT_MODULES="nxp-mwifiex/mxm_wifiex/wlan_src" build/build_abi.sh --update-symbol-list -j8 Then the  common/android/abi_gki_aarch64_imx will be generated. cd gki cp common/android/abi_gki_aarch64_imx /tmp/abi_gki_aarch64_imx   Update GKI kernel rm -r common/* # delete imx kernel repo sync # recover aosp kernel cp /tmp/abi_gki_aarch64_imx android/abi_gki_aarch64_imx cd .. BUILD_CONFIG=common/build.config.gki.aarch64 build/build_abi.sh LTO=thin --update -j8  Then, common/android/abi_gki_aarch64.xml is updated.  
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Installing the new release (Ubuntu 22.04) was detected some NXP boards as iMX8MNEVK, iMX8MM-EVK, iMX8MP-EVK and iMX8ULP-EVK had an issue with the WIFI module that basically it does not initialize at boot. Remember, the supported WIFI modules in Ubuntu 22.04 in the EVKs are the following:       • NXP 88W8987       • NXP 88W9098       • NXP 88W8997       • NXP IW416       • NXP 88W8801       • NXP IW612 To initialize the WIFI module of NXP EVKs in Ubuntu 22.04 you can set the following command in console:   sudo modprobe moal mod_para=nxp/wifi_mod_para.conf   That command find the correct driver for our WIFI module and then initialize it, but this only works when Ubuntu is working and if you reset the EVK you need to set the command again.   The definitive solution is create a custom startup script as a service:   Step 1: Go to etc/systemd/system   cd etc/systemd/system   Step 2: In this directory create a new file with the name of your preference but the extension must be .service. You can do it with nano or vim: sudo nano or sudo vim   The file must contain: [Unit] Description=”Wifi Start” [Service] ExecStart=sudo modprobe moal mod_para=nxp/wifi_mod_para.conf [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target   Now save the file, in my case the name was wifi_start.service.   Step 3: Now we need to enable the script in the startup/boot sequence following the command: sudo systemctl enable wifi_start.service   Remember in wifi_start.service is the name as you saved your file.   Finally, each time you boot your board, the WIFI module will initialize automatically.   Boards tested: iMX8MN (With WIFI module NXP 88W8987) iMX8MM (With WIFI module NXP 88W8987) iMX8MP (With WIFI module NXP 88W8997) iMX8ULP (With WIFI module NXP IW416)  
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This demo for all(bootloader, device tree, Linux kernel, rootfs) in spi. It uses raw read(sf read)/raw write(sf write in uuu script) to achieve that. sf probe 0; sf read ${fdt_addr} 0x500000 0x100000; sf read ${loadaddr} 0x600000 0x1E00000; sf read ${initrd_addr} 0x2400000 0x600000; setenv bootargs console=${console},${baudrate} earlycon=${earlycon},${baudrate} rdinit=/linuxrc; booti ${loadaddr} ${initrd_addr} ${fdt_addr} |-- 0001-all-in-spi-demo-lf-5.10.72-2.2.0.patch --- patch for this demo |-- demo_binary | |-- flash.b0.bin --- b0 bootloader | |-- flash.bin --- c0 bootloader | |-- Image-imx8qxpc0mek.bin --- Linux kernel | |-- imx8qxp-mek.dtb --- device tree | |-- uramdisk_boot.rootfs.aarch64.img --- ram disk | |-- uuu.qspi.all.b0.uuu --- uuu script for b0 | `-- uuu.qspi.all.uuu --- uuu script for c0 `-- readme.txt --- this file # The spi layout used is: # - --------- -------------------------------------------- # | | flash.bin | env | dtb | Image |rootfs| # - --------------- -------------------------------------- # ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ # | | | | | | | # 0 4kiB 4MiB 5MiB 6MiB 36MiB 42MiB 0x1000 0x400000 0x500000 0x600000 0x2400000 Test: HW: i.MX8QXP MEK SW: lf-5.10.72-2.2.0 + 0001-all-in-spi-demo-lf-5.10.72-2.2.0.patch Test log: SF: Detected mt35xu512aba with page size 256 Bytes, erase size 128 KiB, total 64 MiB device 0 offset 0x500000, size 0x100000 SF: 1048576 bytes @ 0x500000 Read: OK device 0 offset 0x600000, size 0x1e00000 SF: 31457280 bytes @ 0x600000 Read: OK device 0 offset 0x2400000, size 0x600000 SF: 6291456 bytes @ 0x2400000 Read: OK [ 4.787552] imx6q-pcie 5f010000.pcie: unable to add pcie port. [ 4.797467] Freeing unused kernel memory: 2944K [ 4.807379] Run /linuxrc as init process Starting syslogd: OK Starting klogd: OK Running sysctl: OK Starting network: OK /bin/sh: can't access tty; job control turned off / #  
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This is about the case studay from two USB related issues: #1. Plugin detection issue caused by an errata in i.MX8/8X (host mode).       Very limited unit may encounter this problem. When issue happens, there will be totally no action on USB host port when a debug plugged in. #2: High Speed disconnection detection issue (host mode):       This may happen on some special USB design which have complex circuit and connector design on the USB path and long USB cable. The USB enumeration might be interrupted by an un-expected disconnection event. System log shows USB recognition started but failed at several different stages during handshake. For details, please refer to the doc attached (#1/#2). A reference patch for each has also been made by David.
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