i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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LTIB Creating Uimage Uboot Configuration file for fw_(printenv/saveenv) utility Add new i.MX5x board on LTIB LTIB Creating Uimage Uboot U-boot expects uImage format for the kernel image. In order to LTIB generate a uImage file: $ export SYSCFG_KTARG=uImage $ ./ltib -p kernel Setup in U-Boot the kernel bootargs: u-boot> setenv bootargs noinitrd console=ttymxc0,115200 init=/linuxrc root=/dev/nfs nfsroot=10.29.244.27:/tftpboot/rootfs ip=dhcp Change 10.29.244.27 to your host IP. The procedure above is needed when default bootloader used by ltib was redboot. In some ltib releases (before 2010) default bootloader is u-boot. In this case, ltib will create uImage by default Configuration file for fw_(printenv/saveenv) utility # Configuration file for fw_(printenv/saveenv) utility. # Up to two entries are valid, in this case the redundant # environment sector is assumed present. # Notice, that the "Number of sectors" is ignored on NOR.               # MTD device name Device offset Env. size Flash sector size Number of sectors #/dev/mtd1 0x0000 0x4000 0x4000 #/dev/mtd2 0x0000 0x4000 0x4000 # NAND example /dev/mtd0 0x80000 0x40000 0x20000 2 Add new i.MX5x board on LTIB After porting u-boot to your i.MX5x board you might want add it on LTIB menu, "Choose your board for u-boot" section. For this, edit ltib/config/platform/imx/main.lkc to add your board: Enter board on menu: comment "Choose your board for u-boot" choice prompt "board" default BOARD_MX51_BBG depends on PLATFORM = "imx51" help This menu will let you choose the board you use. ... + config BOARD_MX53_MYBOARD + bool "mx53_myboard" ... endchoice Add the "mx53_myboard_config" that matches your board configuration on the u-boot Makefile to PKG_U_BOOT_CONFIG_TYPE: config PKG_U_BOOT_CONFIG_TYPE   string   ... + default "mx53_myboard_config" if ( PLATFORM = "imx51" && BOARD_MX53_MYBOARD && !PKG_KERNEL_UPDATER )   ...
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When you do long test (days or weeks) test on i.MX board and your test fails, you often wants to know what has happen with a JTAG probe. The problem is when you have 50 boards running in parallel, you don't have the budget to have 50 JTAG debug probe. If you do a "hot plug" of your JTAG probe, you have roughly one chance out 2 to reset your board... so you'll have to wait another couple of hour to resee the problem. Anyway to have a reliable JTAG plug with no reset, it is really simple... cut the RESET line on your cable! then you'll still be able to "attach" to your i.MX. On the MEK board, with a 10-pin JTAG connector, you have the cut the cable line 10 of the ribbon cable: On the cable, cut the reset line like this: With my Lauterbach JTAG  probe, when I do a "hot plug" I never have a reset of my i.MX. BR Vincent
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The following document contains a list of document, questions and discussions that are relevant in the community based on amount of views. If you are having a problem, doubt or getting started in i.MX processors, you should check the following links to see if your doubt is in there. Yocto Project Freescale Yocto Project main page‌ Yocto Training - HOME‌ i.MX Yocto Project: Frequently Asked Questions‌ Useful bitbake commands‌ Yocto Project Package Management - smart  How to add a new layer and a new recipe in Yocto  Setting up the Eclipse IDE for Yocto Application Development Guide to the .sdcard format  Yocto NFS & TFTP boot  YOCTO project clean  Yocto with a package manager (ex: apt-get)  Yocto Setting the Default Ethernet address and disable DHCP on boot.  i.MX x Building QT for i.MX6  i.MX6/7 DDR Stress Test Tool V3.00  i.MX6DQSDL DDR3 Script Aid  Installing Ubuntu Rootfs on NXP i.MX6 boards  iMX6DQ MAX9286 MIPI CSI2 720P camera surround view solution for Linux BSP i.MX Design&Tool Lists  Simple GPIO Example - quandry  i.MX6 GStreamer-imx Plugins - Tutorial & Example Pipelines  Streaming USB Webcam over Network  Step-by-step: How to setup TI Wilink (WL18xx) with iMX6 Linux 3.10.53  Linux / Kernel Copying Files Between Windows and Linux using PuTTY  Building Linux Kernel  Patch to support uboot logo keep from uboot to kernel for NXP Linux and Android BSP (HDMI, LCD and LVDS)  load kernel from SD card in U-boot  Changing the Kernel configuration for i.MX6 SABRE  Android  The Android Booting process  What is inside the init.rc and what is it used for.  Others How to use qtmultimedia(QML) with Gstreamer 1.0
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Question: When working with v1.6.0.55 using the standard profile for i.MX35 the tool fails most of the time when transferring the target root file system, on v1.6.0.42 it works just fine. The tags on the internal git don’t clearly mention a tool version, but a BSP. Wwhat are the differences between v1.6.0.55 and v1.6.0.42? Or to which tag(or commit) they correspond on git? Answer: 1.6.042 commit by looking at "Apps/MfgTool.exe/docs/changelog.txt": 1ca2a16df736ac51979a67423fef6a09bed6b7e2 And 1.6.055: " 06a4f9190e34297b7273fc4bb4a92737e5bc837f "
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An i. MX50 customer encountered such kernel bug recently. Android UI has no response, because the suspend work queue is blocked:     suspend       pm_suspend         enter_state           suspend_prepare / suspend_finish             pm_prepare_console / pm_restore_console               vt_move_to_console                 vt_waitactive                   vt_event_wait                     wait_event_interruptible Confimed the same bug can also happen on imx6SL which is running linux 3.0.35. e.g. by echo standby/ mem > /sys/power/state It takes over thousand suspend/resume cycles to reproduce the problem. The bug fix has been merged since linux 3.6: commit a7b12929be6cc55eab2dac3330fa9f5984e12dda
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GStreamer has a simple feature to enable tracing, allowing the developer to do basic debugging. These can be done in two ways: Adding the parameter --gst-debug=LIST to the pipeline (a pipeline is a executed gst-launch command) Prepending the environment variable GST_DEBUG=LIST' LIST is a a comma-separated argument, indicating the GStreamer elements to trace. For example, if one needs to trace the sink element      $ GST_DEBUG=*sink*:5 gst-launch playbin2 uri=file:///sample.avi or      $ gst-launch playbin2 uri=file:///sample.avi --gst-debug=*sink*:5 Both commands produces the same log. In case want to trace for than one element, so can simple add the <element>:5, for example      $ GST_DEBUG=mfw_v4lsink:5,vpudec:5 gst-launch playbin2 uri=file:///sample.avi The number 5 indicates the log category, where 5 is the highest (the most verbose log you can get) and 0 produces no output (5=LOG, 4=DEBUG, 3=INFO, 2=WARN, 1=ERROR). Log can be huge in each pipeline run. One way to filter it is using the grep command. Before grepping, one needs to redirect the standard error to the standard output (GStreamer log goes always to stderr), so      $ GST_DEBUG=mfw_v4lsink:5,vpudec:5 gst-launch playbin2 uri=file:///sample.avi 2>&1 | grep <filter string> In case the log needs to be shared, it is important to remove the 'color' of the log, again, one just needs to add the parameter --gst-debug-no-color or prepend the env variable GST_DEBUG_NO_COLOR=1 ----- More shell variables that GStreamer react, can be found here https://developer.gnome.org/gstreamer/0.10/gst-running.html
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Most engineers should incorporate the following fundamental methodology when designing and bringing up a new board design: 1. Review the schematics and layout to ensure proper connectivity of all devices 2. Once the board returns from the manufacturer, measure and document all of the voltage rails of each IC on the board (especially the SoC and DRAM) 3. Ensure JTAG debugger connectivity (due to the complexity of systems today, every new board design should have some “hooks” to allow JTAG connectivity, even if these are simply test points) 4. Bring up and ensure proper DRAM functionality; it is imperative the first three steps are precisely accomplished – often times, DRAM instability or non functionality is due to improper connection (including not being connected to the voltage net) or poor layout. Once these four steps are completed, the board can then proceed to a more broad based checkout of other peripherals using some type of compiled test code executed from DRAM. More often than not, the end user’s board will differ from Freescale reference design boards either in how the DRAMs are connected or simply by using a different DRAM vendor.  As such, tools were created to aid in the development of DRAM initialization scripts.  The resulting script, though targeted for the RealView development system (aka include files), can be easily ported to another debugger’s command syntax or to assembly code for use in boot loaders.  These tools are Excel spread sheet based and include a “How To Use” tab, making the tool usage relatively self-explanatory.  Each tool is unique to a specific i.MX processor and to the DRAM technology used with each processor.  This attached files are tools available for the following i.MX SoCs:
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