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In the i.MX8MP support 3 SDIO interface, and in the reference board i.MX 8M Plus LPDDR4 EVK design default use the eMMC connect to the USDHC3 to boot up from emmc,use the SD card connect to the USDHC2 port. When the U-Boot starts, it will detect the starting slot and automatically set mmcdev and mmcroot, for the USDHC3 in the default Linux set is mmc dev 2. But some customer need to change to the mmc dev 0, make the mmc0 work, see the following introduction.   1 For the EMMC         MMC (multiMedia card) is a communication protocol that supports two modes, SPI and MMC. EMMC is a chip that supports MMC protocol. Both eMMC and SD card package the flash controller and NAND Flash together, but their interfaces are different. eMMC is generally BGA packaged and soldered on PCB.   EMMC includes 11 signals, namely CLK, CMD, DATA0-7 and Data Strobe. The specific signals are as follows: CLK: It is used to output clock signal from the host side, synchronize data transmission and drive device operation. Each cycle can be transmitted on the rising or falling edge, or both CMD: The signal is mainly used by the host to send a command to the eMMC and the eMMC to send a response to the host. DAT0-7: DAT0-7 signal is mainly used for data transmission between Host and eMMC. After the eMMC is powered on or soft reset, only DAT0 can transmit data. After initialization, DAT0-3 or DAT0-7 can be configured for data transmission, that is, the data bus can be configured as 4 bits or 8 bits. Data Strobe: The clock signal is sent to the host by eMMC with the same frequency as the CLK signal. It is used for synchronization of data reception at the host side. The Data Strobe signal can only be configured and enabled in the HS400 mode. After being enabled, the stability of data transmission can be improved and the bus tuning process can be omitted. 2 For the EMMC design on the i.MX8MP LPDDR4 EVK 2.1 The i.MX8MP The i.MX8MP there is 3 SDIO interface,and the i.MX8MP has 3 USDHC ports:USDHC1, USDHC2 and USDHC3.   At i MX8MP supports SD/MMC/eSD/eMMC/SDXC, and starts and boots using the USDHC port based on setting of the BOOT_MODE[3:0] pins.       In the reference design, eMMC is connected to USDHC3, and SD card is connected to USDHC2. USDHC3 is used as the eMMC boot device by default on the development board. We can see the detailed definitions of the three USDHC interfaces in the reference manual. Among them, USDHC1 and USDHC3 are 8 bits and support 8-bit data, while USDHC2 only supports 4-bit data.   2.2 Hardware and software design   The hardware design is as shown above. The eMMC is connected to the SD3 interface, and the software is configured in this way by default.   Note: It should be noted here that although the i. MX8MP USDHC1 supports 8bit, it can be used to connect to EMMC, i The MX8MP does not support booting from the SD1 interface. You can see from the boot mode pins above that there is no corresponding setting. Special attention should be paid to this. Some customers will ignore this when designing hardware. This is the design. There is no way for the software to start from USDHC1. 2.3 The port number of the default BSP In the i.MX 8M Plus LPDDR4 EVK development board design, the eMMC is connected to the USDHC3 as the default boot device When the U-Boot starts, it will detect the starting slot, and automatically set mmcdev and mmcroot. For USDHC3, the default is mmc dev 2.   The device structure of SD/MMC cards is similar. MMC should be the predecessor of SD, but the design of MMC at that time was half that of SD. Therefore, the SD/MMC driver is universal, and the device node of Linux continues the name of MMC.   Meaning of blk: blk is a block device, and the number after ⾯ is the serial number of the device   Meaning of p: p indicates partition, and p1 is the first partition   We can see the correspondence between the USDHC interface and the mmc under Linux. The kernel MMC module now uses a fixed mmcblk index for the uSDHC slot. The default BSP is "mmc2=&usdhc3":   In the design of the MX 8M Plus LPDDR4 EVK development board, by default, the eMMC is connected to the USDHC3, SD3 is used, and mmcblk2 is used in the SD3 slot. When setting the kernel parameters in the u-boot, you can see that: ### select mmc dev 2 (USDHC3) on the i.MX 8M Mini EVK, i.MX 8M Nano EVK, and i.MX 8M Plus EVK: U-Boot > mmc dev 2 0 For the emmc the related port is :mmcblk2 By default, the flash target is MMC: 2 after the Demo images burning of the development board is started.   3 mmc0 work as emmc device and boot up We need to modify the device, u-boot, kernel related part for the mmc0 work on the android BSP, 3.1 Software modify 2.2.1 u-boot: Dts section root / arch / arm / dts / imx8mp-evk.dts : memory@40000000 {                  device_type = "memory";                  reg = <0x0 0x40000000 0 0xc0000000>,                        <0x1 0x00000000 0 0xc0000000>;         }; aliases { /* SD/MMC: eMMC/SD slot numbering fix */        mmc0 = &usdhc3; /*Modify the usdhc3 and mmc0, default is mmc2*/        mmc1 = &usdhc2; /* usdhc2 and mmc0 do not change*/        mmc2 = &usdhc1; /*Modify the usdhc1 to mmc2, make the usdhc1 work*/         }; reg_can1_stby: regulator-can1-stby {…..} Board secton: root / board / freescale / imx8mp_evk / imx8mp_evk.c int board_init(void) {         struct arm_smccc_res res; } int board_mmc_get_env_dev(int devno) {        if(devno == 0)         return devno + 2;           else if (devno == 2)         return devno - 2;           else         return devno; }   int mmc_map_to_kernel_blk(int devno) {         return devno; } int board_late_init(void) {         board_late_mmc_env_init(); } SPL: root / common / spl / spl_mmc.c int spl_mmc_load_image(struct spl_image_info *spl_image,                         struct spl_boot_device *bootdev) {…..} Default settings:     2.2.2 kernel section: In the kernel section need to change all the related mmcblk2 to mmcblk0.                   2.2.3 device section modify: Change all the related mmcblk2 to mmcblk0. Change the uuu_imx_android_flash.bat /android_build/device/nxp/common/tools/fastboot_imx_flashall.bat if not [%soc_name:imx8mp=%] == [%soc_name%] (  set vid=0x1fc9& set pid=00x0146& set chip=MX8MP  set uboot_env_start=0x2000& set uboot_env_len=0x8  - set emmc_num=2& set sd_num=1 + set emmc_num=0& set sd_num=1  set board=evk  goto :device_info_end   All the modify see the Patch in the attachment.
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In the i.MX 8M Plus LPDDR4 EVK board there are two Type-C port design. For the port0 is used to power supply no usb function, for the port1 used for USB function but without PD function. But in customer’s design, customer only use one USB design on their board, how to make the one USB work with the PD and USB function, we need to make the hardware design and software modify. This article only give method to realized it and have tested and realized the port1 PD function. 1 Introduction of the USB interface on i.MX8MP         There are two USB 3.0 TypeC controllers with integrated PHY interface on the i.MX8MP: Backward compatibility with USB 2.0 Spread spectrum clock support   The USB on the i.MX8MP supports USB3.0 and is compatible with USB2.0 downward. We can see that the upper layer is the universal layer for USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 operations. This is a common interface, buffer management block, list processor, used to schedule and control the status register (CSR) function: USB 2.0 physical layer and MAC layer USB 3.0 physical layer, link layer and MAC layer   Features of USB 3.0: USB compliant version 3.0 (xHCI compatible) Supports operation as a stand-alone USB host controller USB dual role operation, configurable as host or device Ultra high speed (5Gbit/s), high speed (480Mbit/s), full speed (12Mbit/s) and low speed (1.5Mbit/s) operation. Support independent single port USB operation Support for four programmable bidirectional USB endpoints Support system memory interface with 40 bit addressing capability   2 Design of USB on Development Board         The i.MX 8M Plus processor includes two USB 2.0/3.0 controllers and two integrated USB PHYs. USB supports both running as an independent USB host controller and dual role USB operation, and can be configured as a host or device. Therefore, the design of these two functions is implemented on the development board of i.MX8MP.   We can see that on the development board, one USB1 is used for the USB Type-C port and the other USB2 is used for the USB 3.0 host port. USB Type-C port 0 (J5) is only used for power supply. It does not support USB data transfer. It is the only power port, so the system must always be powered.   On the CPU side of the schematic diagram, we can also see that USB1 is the port for USB Type-C, and USB2 is the host for USB3.0. (During the design, it should be noted that USB1 should be used as the download port. ROM code only supports USB1 download.).    USB1 is designed as USB Type-C:   USB2 USB3.0 Host design:   Power design of the USB Type-C port:   3 Only one USB interface is used in the design (compatible with both USB PD function and USB dual roles function)         Two USB Type-C ports are used on our development board. One is used to power the board separately, and the other is used as the function of USB Type-C. However, due to the limited design cost and chip layout and space on the board, some customers will use a USB interface to realize the dual role function of power supply and USB. How to achieve this? USB Device(Download mode):     USB Host mode(power+device Need the hub support PD function):     The specific implementation and design are as follows: 3.1 Hardware realize PTN5110 To realize the USB Type-C support power supply function, PTN5110 (USB PD TCPC PHY IC) chip is required to realize Type-C data logic and power control and management. The selection of PTN5110 is critical and important.   PTN5110 is a single port USB PD (power supply) PHY IC that conforms to TCPC. It integrates Type-C configuration channel (CC) interface and USB PD physical layer functions into Type-C port manager (TCPM) that handles PD policy management. It complies with USB PD, Type-C and TCPC specifications.   The IC is mainly aimed at applications in system platforms (such as laptops, desktops, Chromebooks, tablets, flip notebooks, etc.). Other application cases may be feasible, depending on the application architecture, such as docking stations, displays, accessories, cable adapters, smartphones, etc.   It can support various Type-C applications: Sink, Source, Sink with accessory support or DRP. It executes Type-C CC simulation part (i.e. Rd/Rp/Ra detection, Rd/Rp indication) and PD Tx/Rx PHY and protocol state machine. PTN5110 supports TCPM in the system implementation of the following PD roles.   PTN5110 integrates VCONN load switch, programmable current limit, reverse leakage current blocking and over temperature protection (OTP). It is equipped with two enable control outputs to control the load switch/FET in the VBUS pull and/or sink path. It can also perform VBUS voltage monitoring/measurement, VBUS forced discharge and discharge discharge.   PTN5110 provides the main IO related functions for the main processor/TCPM, so that Type-C/PD interfaces can be easily controlled and managed through the TCPC interface.   PTN5110 supports a wide range of power input voltages, providing platform integrators with great flexibility. PTN5110 can run on VBUS to support specific system use cases that require no power operation. https://www.nxp.com/products/interfaces/usb-interfaces/usb-type-c/usb-pd-phy-and-cc-logic/usb-pd-tcpc-phy-ic:PTN5110   The design only use the USB1:   Here, it is required to weld R53 or R54. You can refer to this design completely. 2 Software modify Modify the BPS of the software: Take the newest released Linux 5.15.32_2.0.0 ​ as example: In the u-boot /board/freescale/imx8mp_evk/imx8mp_evk.c     It can be seen that the PD function of the port is turned off, so if you want to use USB1 for power supply, remove the following commands and turn on the PD function of USB1. “-   .disable_pd = true,” Use the above action to enable Port1 PD function. Kernel section modify: Kernel section modify towards to PTN5110. Type-C Configure channel (CC) interface: root/drivers/usb/typec/tcpm/tcpci.c @@ -524,6 +524,7 @@ static int tcpci_vbus_force_discharge(struct tcpc_dev *tcpc, bool enable)  static int tcpci_set_vbus(struct tcpc_dev *tcpc, bool source, bool sink)  {        struct tcpci *tcpci = tcpc_to_tcpci(tcpc); +      unsigned int reg;        int ret;          if (tcpci->data->set_vbus) { @@ -533,16 +534,20 @@ static int tcpci_set_vbus(struct tcpc_dev *tcpc, bool source, bool sink)                         return ret < 0 ? ret : 0;        }   +      ret = regmap_read(tcpci->regmap, TCPC_POWER_STATUS, &reg); +      if (ret < 0) +              return ret; +        /* Disable both source and sink first before enabling anything */   -       if (!source) { +      if (!source && (reg & TCPC_POWER_STATUS_SOURCING_VBUS)) {                 ret = regmap_write(tcpci->regmap, TCPC_COMMAND,                                     TCPC_CMD_DISABLE_SRC_VBUS);                 if (ret < 0)                         return ret;        }   -       if (!sink) { +      if (!sink && (reg & TCPC_POWER_STATUS_SINKING_VBUS)) {                 ret = regmap_write(tcpci->regmap, TCPC_COMMAND,                                     TCPC_CMD_DISABLE_SINK_VBUS);                 if (ret < 0)   Type-C port manager managed by PD (TCPM): root/drivers/usb/typec/tcpm / tcpm.c @@ -340,6 +340,7 @@ struct tcpm_port {         */        bool vbus_vsafe0v;   +      bool vbus_keep;        bool vbus_never_low;        bool vbus_source;        bool vbus_charge; @@ -3662,7 +3663,8 @@ static void tcpm_reset_port(struct tcpm_port *port)        port->rx_msgid = -1;          port->tcpc->set_pd_rx(port->tcpc, false); -       tcpm_init_vbus(port);     /* also disables charging */ +      if (!port->vbus_keep) +              tcpm_init_vbus(port);  /* also disables charging */        tcpm_init_vconn(port);        tcpm_set_current_limit(port, 0, 0);        tcpm_set_polarity(port, TYPEC_POLARITY_CC1); @@ -5834,6 +5836,9 @@ static void tcpm_init(struct tcpm_port *port)          port->tcpc->init(port->tcpc);   +      port->vbus_present = port->tcpc->get_vbus(port->tcpc); +      if (port->vbus_present) +              port->vbus_keep = true;        tcpm_reset_port(port);          /* @@ -5872,7 +5877,10 @@ static void tcpm_init(struct tcpm_port *port)         * Some adapters need a clean slate at startup, and won't recover         * otherwise. So do not try to be fancy and force a clean disconnect.         */ -       tcpm_set_state(port, PORT_RESET, 0); +      if (!port->vbus_keep) +              tcpm_set_state(port, PORT_RESET, 0); + +      port->vbus_keep = false;  }    static int tcpm_port_type_set(struct typec_port *p, enum typec_port_type type) Note: The software just needs to modify these two parts. You also need to mention to the proper the I2C port use, if not proper the driver of the PTN5110 can not driver. 4 Test         In our i. MX8MP EVK development board show that R53 and R54 in the USB1 part of our development board are in DNP status, so VBUS_ IN is disconnected and no power comes in. Here, connect R53 or R54 with solder, so that VBUS_ IN, the power comes in again. After the power is connected. The board can be powered through USB1. 4.1 Download images to the emmc on the Board: Power from the USB1, set the boot mode to serial download mode, then go to download images finished. 4.2 Boot up the board from the EMMC Change the boot mode to boot up from EMMC,the board boot up, the log file is as following show:   It will stop at the TCPC for the section of PTN5110 driver. By default, the PD function of port1 in the u-boot is turned off, so if you want to use USB1 for power supply, remove the following commands and turn on the PD function of USB1. “-   .disable_pd = true,” After the PD function is turned on, the board can be started normally, but the whole part running to the kernel will be powered down, so the kernel part of PTN5110 still needs to be modified. After the patch modification of the above kernel part, the board can run normally.         I also did the same experiment on the i.MX8MM EVK development board. The same phenomenon occurs when the kernel starts. Therefore, similar modifications to the above i. MX8MP can work normally. Summary: In one word i.MX8MP and i.MX8M series can realize the role of using a USB for power supply and USB Dual. The hardware design refers to our development board, and we must use the logic chip PTN5110. For software, refer to the above code modification.  
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  Just sharing some experiences during the development and studying.   Although, it appears some hardwares, it focuses on software to speed up your developing on your  hardware.     杂记共享一下在开发和学习过程中的经验。    虽然涉及一些硬件,但其本身关注软件,希望这些能加速您在自己硬件上的开发。   09/26/2022 parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing - NXP Community   Provide  run under windows   09/16/2022   create sdcard mirror under windows https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MM-SDCARD-Secondary-Boot-Demo/ta-p/1500011     08/03/2022   i.MX8MM SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MM-SDCARD-Secondary-Boot-Demo/ta-p/1500011     02/16/2022 mx8_ddr_stress_test without UI   https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/mx8-ddr-stress-test-without-UI/ta-p/1414090   12/23/2021 i.MX8 i.MX8X Board Reset https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8-i-MX8X-Board-Reset/ta-p/1391130       12/21/2021 regulator userspace-consumer https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/regulator-userspace-consumer/ta-p/1389948     11/24/2021 crypto af_alg blackkey demo crypto af_alg blackkey demo - NXP Community   09/28/2021 u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) u-boot runtime modify Linux device tree(dtb) - NXP Community     08/17/2021 gpio-poweroff demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/gpio-poweroff-demo/ta-p/1324306         08/04/2021 How to use gpio-hog demo https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/How-to-use-gpio-hog-demo/ta-p/1317709       07/14/2021 SWUpdate OTA i.MX8MM EVK / i.MX8QXP MEK https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/SWUpdate-OTA-i-MX8MM-EVK-i-MX8QXP-MEK/ta-p/1307416     04/07/2021 i.MX8QXP eMMC Secondary Boot https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/i-MX8QXP-eMMC-Secondary-Boot/ba-p/1257704#M45       03/25/2021 sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition from A core side sc_misc_board_ioctl to access the M4 partition fr... - NXP Community     03/17/2021 How to Changei.MX8X MEK+Base Board  Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8X-MEK-Base-Board-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1246779#M43     03/16/2021 How to Change i.MX8MM evk Linux Debug UART https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Community-Articles/How-to-Change-i-MX8MM-evk-Linux-Debug-UART/ba-p/1243938#M40       05/06/2020 Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's environment variables Linux fw_printenv fw_setenv to access U-Boot's env... - NXP Community     03/30/2020 i.MX6 DDR calibration/stress for Mass Production https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-346065     03/25/2020 parseIVT - a script to help i.MX6 Code Signing https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345998     02/17/2020 Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground Start your machine learning journey from tensorflow playground      01/15/2020 How to add  iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup How to add iMX8QXP PAD(GPIO) Wakeup    01/09/2020 Understand iMX8QX Hardware Partitioning By Making M4 Hello world Running Correctly https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-345359   09/29/2019 Docker On i.MX6UL With Ubuntu16.04 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344462   09/25/2019 Docker On i.MX8MM With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344473 Docker On i.MX8QXP With Ubuntu https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344474     08/28/2019 eMMC5.0 vs eMMC5.1 https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-344265     05/24/2019 How to upgrade  Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU How to upgrade Linux Kernel and dtb on eMMC without UUU     04/12/2019 eMMC RPMB Enhance and GP https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343116   04/04/2019 How to Dump a GPT SDCard Mirror(Android O SDCard Mirror) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343079   04/04/2019 i.MX Create Android SDCard Mirror https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343078   04/02/2019: i.MX Linux Binary_Demo Files Tips  https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343075   04/02/2019:       Update Set fast boot        eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf   02/28/2019: imx_builder --- standalone build without Yocto https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-342702   08/10/2018: i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG update    Update slide CMA Arrangement Consideration i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_08102018.pdf   07/26/2018 Understand ML With Simplest Code https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341099     04/23/2018:     i.MX8M Standalone Build     i.MX8M Standalone Build.pdf     04/13/2018:      i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG  update            Add slide CMA Arrangement  Consideration     i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_04132018.pdf   09/05/2017:       Update eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 09/01/2017:       eMMC RPMB, Enhance  and GP       eMMC_RPMB_Enhance_and_GP.pdf 08/30/2017:     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display(For i.MX6DQ/DLS)     Dual LVDS for High Resolution Display.pdf 08/27/2017:  L3.14.28 Ottbox Porting Notes:         L3.14.28_Ottbox_Porting_Notes-20150805-2.pdf MFGTool Uboot Share With the Normal Run One:        MFGTool_Uboot_share_with_NormalRun_sourceCode.pdf Mass Production with programmer        Mass_Production_with_NAND_programmer.pdf        Mass_Production_with_emmc_programmer.pdf AndroidSDCARDMirrorCreator https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-329596 L3.10.53 PianoPI Porting Note        L3.10.53_PianoPI_PortingNote_151102.pdf Audio Codec WM8960 Porting L3.10.53 PianoPI        AudioCodec_WM8960_Porting_L3.10.53_PianoPI_151012.pdf TouchScreen PianoPI Porting Note         TouchScreen_PianoPI_PortingNote_151103.pdf Accessing GPIO From UserSpace        Accessing_GPIO_From_UserSpace.pdf        https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343344 FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX        FreeRTOS for i.MX6SX.pdf i.MX6SX M4 fastup        i.MX6SX M4 fastup.pdf i.MX6 SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo        i.MX6_SDCARD_Secondary_Boot_Demo.pdf i.MX6SX M4 MPU Settings For RPMSG        i.MX6SX_M4_MPU_Settings_For_RPMSG_10082016.pdf Security        Security03172017.pdf    NOT related to i.MX, only a short memo
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the  i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response. i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools Overview The i.MX 8M Family DDR Tool is a Windows-based software to help users to do LPDDR4/DDR4/DDR3L training, stress test and DDR initial code generation for u-boot SPL.  This page contains the latest releases for the i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools and cover the following SoCs : i.MX 8M Quad and its derivatives i.MX 8 M Quadlite and i.MX 8M Dual i.MX 8M Mini Quad and its derivatives i.MX 8M Mini Quadlite/Dual/DualLite/Solo/SoloLite  i.MX 8M Nano Quad and   its derivatives i.MX 8M Nano Quadlite/Dual/DualLite/Solo/SoloLite  i.MX 8M Plus   NOTE: For the i.MX 8/8X Family of DDR tools please refer to the: i.MX 8/8X Family DDR Tools Release   The purpose of the i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools is to enable users to generate and test a custom DRAM initialization based on their device configuration (density, number of chip selects, etc.) and board layout (data bus bit swizzling, etc.).  This process equips the user to then proceed with the bring-up of a boot loader and an OS.  Once the OS is brought up, it is recommended to run an OS-based memory test (like Linux memtester) to further verify and test the DDR memory interface.     The  i.MX 8M Family DDR Tools consist of: DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) MSCALE DDR Tool   For more details regarding these DDR tools and their usage, refer to the i.MX 8M DDR Tools User Guide.   i.MX 8M Family DDR Tool    The i.MX 8M Family  DDR stress test tool is a Windows-based software tool that is used as a mechanism to verify that the DDR initialization is operational for use with u-boot and OS bring-up. To install the DDR Stress Test, save and extract the zip file mscale_ddr_tool_vXXX_setup.exe.zip     (where 'xxx' is the current version number) and follow the on-screen installation instructions.     i.MX 8M Family DDR Tool   Requirements   The tool requires access to the Windows registry, hence  users must run it in administrator mode . When users design new i.MX 8M Family boards, please make sure to follow the rules outlined in the respective Hardware Developers Guide and the MSCALE_DDR_Tool_User_Guide , which can help users bring up DDR devices on their respective i.MX 8M boards.   i.MX 8M Family DDR Tool  User Guide   The i.MX 8M DDR tool includes the document: MSCALE_DDR_Tool_User_Guide NOTE: Please read the MSCALE_DDR_Tool_User_Guide inside the package carefully before you use this tool.   i.MX8M DDR Tool Revision History   Rev Major Changes* (Features) Comments 3.30 Fix DBI enabled issue for all i.MX 8M series Automatically identify ROHM and PCA9450 PMICs on i.MX 8M Nano board Fix 4GB/8GB memory tester issues   3.20 Add support to i.MX 8M Plus   3.10 Fixe UART communication issues for some specific characters between the PC software and the target board. Fine-tune DDRPHY registers in generated C code.   3.00 Add support to i.MX8M-nano Add support to different PMIC or PMIC configuration Add support to stress test for all DDR frequency points RPA tools for Nano include support for DDR3L, DDR4, and LPDDR4.   Note that the DDR3L and LPDDR4 RPAs contain the name preliminary only to denote that these RPAs are based on internal NXP validation boards where the DDR4 RPA is based on the released EVK.   2.10 Change DDR4 capacity computing method   2.00 Add support to i.MX8M-mini   * Further details available in the release notes   Sample configuration in the .ds script for i.MX 8M debug UART2: ################step 0: configure debug uart port. Assumes use of UART IO Pads.   ##### ##### If using non-UART pads (i.e. using other pads to mux out the UART signals), ##### ##### then it is up to the user to overwrite the following IO register settings   ##### memory set 0x3033023C 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART2_RXD memory set 0x30330240 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART2_TXD memory set 0x303304A4 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART2_RXD memory set 0x303304A8 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART2_TXD memory set 0x303304FC 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART2_SEL_RXD sysparam set debug_uart   1 #UART index from 0 ('0' = UART1, '1' = UART2, '2' = UART3, '3' = UART4)   Sample configuration in the front of the .ds script for i.MX 8M debug UART3  ################step 0: configure debug uart port. Assumes use of UART IO Pads.   ##### ##### If using non-UART pads (i.e. using other pads to mux out the UART signals), ##### ##### then it is up to the user to overwrite the following IO register settings   ##### memory set 0x30330244 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART3_RXD memory set 0x30330248 32 0x00000000 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART3_TXD memory set 0x303304AC 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART3_RXD memory set 0x303304B0 32 0x0000000E #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_UART3_TXD memory set 0x30330504 32 0x00000002 #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_UART3_SEL_RXD sysparam set debug_uart   2 #UART index from 0 ('0' = UART1, '1' = UART2, '2' = UART3, '3' = UART4)   Sample configuration in the front of the .ds script for i.MX 8M Mini PMIC configuration: ##############step 0.5: configure I2C port IO pads according to your PCB design.   ##### ########### You can modify the following instructions to adapt to your board PMIC ####### memory set 0x30330214 32 0x00000010  #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_I2C1_SCL memory set 0x30330218 32 0x00000010  #IOMUXC_SW_MUX_I2C1_SDA memory set 0x3033047C 32 0x000000C6 #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_I2C1_SCL memory set 0x30330480 32 0x000000C6  #IOMUXC_SW_PAD_I2C1_SDA sysparam set pmic_cfg 0x004B #bit[7:0] = PMIC addr,bit[15:8]=I2C Bus. Bus index from 0 ('0' = I2C1, '1' = I2C2, '2' = I2C3, '3' = I2C4) sysparam set pmic_set 0x2F01 #bit[7:0] = Reg val, bit[15:8]=Reg addr. #REG(0x2F) = 0x01 sysparam set pmic_set 0x0C02   #REG(0x0C) = 0x02 sysparam set pmic_set 0x171E   #REG(0x17) = 0x1E sysparam set pmic_set 0x0C00   #REG(0x0C) = 0x00 sysparam set pmic_set 0x2F11    #REG(0x2F)=0x11     i.MX 8M Family DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) The i.MX 8M DDR RPA (or simply RPA) is an Excel spreadsheet tool used to develop DDR initialization for a user’s specific DDR configuration (DDR device type, density, etc.). The RPA generates the DDR initialization(in a separate Excel worksheet tab):   DDR Stress Test Script : This format is used specifically with the DDR stress test by first copying the contents in this worksheet tab and then pasting it to a text file, naming the document with the “.ds” file extension. The user will select this file when executing the DDR stress test. The How to Use  Excel worksheet tab provides instructions on using the RPA   i.MX 8M Family DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA): Current Versions To obtain the latest RPAs, please refer to the following links (note, existing RPAs have been removed from this main page and moved to the SoC specific links below): i.MX 8M Quad : https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8M-m850D-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1172441 i.MX 8M Mini : https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MMini-m845S-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1172443 i.MX 8M Nano: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX8MNano-m815S-DDR-Register-Programming-Aid-RPA/ta-p/1172444 i.MX 8M Plus: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX-8MPlus-m865S-DDR-Register-Programming-Aids-RPA/ta-p/1235352   Processor Mask Revisions Memory Supported Latest RPA Version * i.MX 8M Quad & Derivatives All LPDDR4 Rev 31 i.MX 8M Quad & Derivatives All DDR4 Rev 15 i.MX 8M Quad & Derivatives All DDR3L Rev 8 i.MX 8M Mini  & Derivatives A0 LPDDR4 Rev 21 i.MX 8M Mini  & Derivatives A0 DDR4 Rev 18 i.MX 8M Mini & Derivatives A0 DDR3L Rev 9 i.MX 8M Nano & Derivatives A0 LPDDR4 Rev 8 i.MX 8M Nano & Derivatives A0 DDR4 Rev 9 i.MX 8M Nano & Derivatives A0 DDR3L Rev 4 i.MX 8M Plus & Derivatives A1 LPDDR4 Rev 8 i.MX 8M Plus & Derivatives A1 DDR4 Rev 6 * For the details about the updates, please refer to the Revision History tab of the respective RPA.    To modify the DRAM Frequency for a custom setting refer to iMX 8M Mini Register Programming Aid DRAM PLL setting    Related Resources Links: iMX 8M Mini Register Programming Aid DRAM PLL setting  i.MX 8/8X Series DDR Tool Release  i.MX 6/7 DDR Stress test GUI Tool i.MX 8M Application Processor Related Resources i.MX8M (m850D) DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA)  i.MX8MMini (m845S) DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA)  i.MX8MNano (m815S) DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) i.MX 8MPlus (m865S) DDR Register Programming Aids (RPA)    
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  This is a detailed programming aid for the registers associated with i.MX 8M Plus DDR initialization. LPDDR4 DDR4  For more details, refer to the main mScale DDR tools page: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX-8M-Family-DDR-Tool-Release/ta-p/1104467 Please note that this page is only intended to store the RPA spreadsheets. For questions, please create a new community thread.  
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The purpose of this document is to specify the maximum LPDDR4 ,DDR4 and DDR3L densities that are supported by i.MX 8M family of processors to aid project feasibility assessment capabilities of customers that are evaluating the SoCs for usage in their products.   It is strongly recommended to consult with NXP and the memory vendor the final choice of the memory part number to ensure that the device meets all the compatibility, availability, longevity and pricing requirements.  In all cases, it is strongly recommended to follow the DRAM layout guidelines outlined in the NXP Hardware Developer's Guides for the specific SoCs. For any questions related to specific DRAM part numbers please contact the respective DRAM vendor. For any questions regarding the i.MX SoC please contact your support representative or enter a support ticket.  LPDDR4 SoC Max data bus width Maximum density Assumed memory organization Notes i.MX 8M Quad 32-bit 32Gb/4GB dual rank, dual-channel  device with 16-row addresses (R0-R15) 1, 2, 4 i.MX 8M Mini  32-bit 64Gb/8GB dual rank, dual-channel  device with 17-row addresses (R0-R16) 1, 2 i.MX 8M Nano  16-bit 32Gb/4GB dual rank, single-channel  device with 17-row addresses (R0-R16) 1, 2, 3, 12 i.MX 8M Plus  32-bit 64Gb/8GB dual rank, dual-channel  device with 17-row addresses (R0-R16)  1, 2   LPDDR4 - list of validated memories The validation process is an ongoing effort - regular updates of the table are expected. SoC Density Validated part number (vendor) Notes i.MX 8M Quad  24Gb/3GB MT53B768M32D4NQ-062 WT:B (Micron) - i.MX 8M Mini 16Gb/2GB MT53D512M32D2DS-053 WT:D (Micron) - 16Gb/2GB M56Z16G32512A (ESMT) 5 32Gb/4GB MT53E1G32D2FW-046 WT:A (Micron) 5 64Gb/8GB MT53E2G32D4DT-046 AIT:A (Micron) 5 i.MX 8M Nano  16Gb/2GB C1612PC2WDGTKR-U (Kingston) - 32Gb/4GB MT53E2G32D4DT-046 AIT:A (Micron) 5, 13 8Gb/1GB MT53D512M32D2DS-053 WT:D (Micron) 13 i.MX 8M Plus 48Gb/6GB MT53E1536M32D4DT-046 WT:A  (Micron) -   DDR4 SoC Max data bus width Maximum density Assumed memory organization Notes i.MX 8M Quad  32-bit 32Gb/4GB x16, 16 Gb device with 1 bank group address, 17-row addresses and 10 column addresses 1, 6 i.MX 8M Mini  32-bit 64Gb/8GB x16, 16 Gb device with 1 bank group address, 17-row addresses and 10 column addresses 1, 7 i.MX 8M Nano  16-bit 64Gb/8GB x8, 16 Gb device with 2 bank group addresses, 17-row addresses and 10 column addresses 1, 8 i.MX 8M Plus  32-bit 64Gb/8GB x16, 16 Gb device with 1 bank group address, 17-row addresses and 10 column addresses 1, 7   DDR4 - list of validated memories The validation process is an ongoing effort - regular updates of the table are expected. SoC Density Validated part number (vendor) i.MX 8M Quad 32Gb/4GB 4x MT40A512M16JY-083EAAT (Micron) i.MX 8M Mini  16Gb/2GB 2x MT40A512M16LY-075:E (Micron) i.MX 8M Nano 16Gb/2GB 1x MT40A1G16RC-062E:B (Micron) i.MX 8M Plus 64Gb/8GB 4x MT40A1G16RC-062E:B (Micron) 16Gb/2GB NT5AD512M16C4-JRI (Nanya)   DDR3L SoC Max data bus width Maximum density Assumed memory organization Notes i.MX 8M Quad  32-bit 32Gb/4GB x16, 8Gb device with 16-row addresses and 10 column addresses 1, 9 i.MX 8M Mini  32-bit 64Gb/8GB x8, 8Gb device with 16-row addresses and 11 column addresses 1, 10 i.MX 8M Nano  16-bit 32Gb/4GB x8, 8Gb device with 16-row addresses and 11 column addresses 1, 11 i.MX 8M Plus  i.MX 8M Plus  does not support DDR3L   DDR3L - list of validated memories The validation process is an ongoing effort - regular updates of the table are expected. SoC Density Validated part number (vendor) i.MX 8M Quad  16Gb/2GB 4x MT41K256M16TW-107 AAT (Micron) i.MX 8M Mini  16Gb/2GB 4x MT41K256M16TW-107 AAT (Micron)   Note 1: The numbers are based purely on the IP vendor documentation for the DDR Controller and the DDR PHY, on the settings of the implementation parameters chosen for their integration into the SoC, and on the JEDEC standards JESD209-4/JESD209-4A (LPDDR4), JESD279-4/JESD279-4A (DDR4), and JESD79-3E/JESD79-3F/JESD79-3-1A (DDR3/DDR3L). Therefore, they are not backed by validation, unless said otherwise and there is no guarantee that an SoC with the specific density and/or desired internal organization is offered by the memory vendors. Should the customers choose to use the maximum density and assume it in the intended use case, they do it at their own risk. Note 2: Byte-mode LPDDR4 devices (x16 channel internally split between two dies, x8 each) of any density are not supported therefore, the numbers are applicable only to devices with x16 internal organization (referred to as "standard" in the JEDEC specification). Note 3: The memory vendors often do not offer so many variants of single-channel memory devices. As an alternative, a dual-channel device with only one channel connected may be used. For example: A dual-rank, single-channel device with 16-row address bits has a density of 16Gb. If such a device is not available at the chosen supplier, a dual-rank, dual-channel device with 16-row address bits can be used instead. This device has a density of 32 Gb however since only one channel can be connected to the SoC, only half of the density is available (16 Gb). Usage of more than one discrete memory chips to overcome market constraints is not supported since only point-to-point connections are assumed for LPDDR4. Note 4: Devices with 17-row addresses (R0-R16) are not supported by the DDR Controller Note 5: The memory part number did not undergo full JEDEC verification however, it passed all functional testing items (Stress Test, vTSA analysis, memtester). Note 6: The density can be achieved by connecting 2 single-rank discrete devices with one 16Gb die each. Since the SoC supports x8 devices and also has connectivity for a second rank, usage of more discrete devices is possible. However, this advantage cannot be used to get higher density since this SoC has only 32Gb/4GB of address space dedicated for the DDR. Two x16 16Gb devices giving 32Gb/4GB in total is, therefore, the optimal choice that balances the maximum density aspects, the signal integrity aspects (only two discrete devices used), and bandwidth aspects (full data bus width used). Note 7: The density can be achieved by connecting 4 single rank discrete devices with one 16Gb die each, 2 devices connected to each chip select.  Since the SoC supports x8 devices, the usage of more discrete devices is possible. However, this advantage cannot be used to get higher density since this SoC has only 64Gb/8GB of address space dedicated for the DDR. Four x16 16Gb devices giving 64Gb/8GB in total is the optimal choice that balances the maximum density aspects, the signal integrity aspects (only four discrete devices used), and the bandwidth aspects (full data bus width used). Note 8: The density can be achieved by connecting 4 single rank discrete devices with one 16Gb die each, 2 devices connected to each chip select.  Note 9: The density can be achieved by connecting 4 single rank discrete devices with one 8Gb die each, 2 devices connected to each chip select, or by connecting 2 dual rank discrete devices with two 8Gb dies each. Since the SoC supports x8 devices, the usage of more discrete devices is possible. However, this advantage cannot be used to get higher density since this SoC has only 32Gb/4GB of address space dedicated for the DDR. Four x16 8Gb devices giving 32Gb/4GB in total is, therefore, the optimal choice that balances the maximum density aspects, the signal integrity aspects (four discrete devices used), and bandwidth aspects (full data bus width used). Note 10: The density can be achieved by connecting 8 single rank discrete devices with one 8Gb die each, 4 devices connected to each chip select or by connecting 4 dual rank discrete devices with two 8Gb dies each. Note that the first option significantly exceeds the number of devices used on the validation board (4 discrete devices) therefore, it is not guaranteed that the i.MX would be able to drive the signals with margin to the required voltage levels due to increased loading on the traces. A significant effort would be required in terms of PCB layout and signal integrity analysis. Practically, it is not recommended to use more than 4 discrete DDR3L devices. This corresponds to the maximum density of 32Gb/4GB in the case of the single rank devices containing one 8Gb die or 64Gb/8GB in case of the dual-rank devices, each containing two 8Gb dies. Note 11: The density can be achieved by connecting 4 single rank discrete devices with one 8Gb die each, 2 devices connected to each chip select or by connecting 2 dual rank discrete devices with two 8Gb dies each. Note 12: For single-channel (x16) memory devices, the current maximum available density in the market is 16Gb/2GB (Q1 2022). Note 13: Only one channel of the device (and hence, half of its density) was utilized due to the reduced data bus width (x16) of the SoC.
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  Test environment   i.MX8MP EVK LVDS0 LVDS-HDMI  bridge(it6263) L5.15.5_1.0.0 Background   Some customers need show logo using LVDS panel. Current BSP doesn't support LVDS driver in Uboot. This patch provides i.MX8MPlus LVDS driver support in Uboot. If you want to connect it to LVDS panel , you need port your lvds panel driver like 67191 or use simple-panel.c   Update [2022.9.19] Verify on L5.15.32_2.0.0 'probe video device failed, ret -2' is caused by below code. // /* Only handle devices that have a valid ofnode */ // if (dev_has_ofnode(dev) && !(dev->driver->flags & DM_FLAG_IGNORE_DEFAULT_CLKS)) { // /* // * Process 'assigned-{clocks/clock-parents/clock-rates}' // * properties // */ // ret = clk_set_defaults(dev, CLK_DEFAULTS_PRE); // if (ret) // goto fail; // }      
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On behalf of Gopise Yuan. This is an update for the DRM framebuffer capture tool I used to share with the team. Some enhancement added. Might be useful for debugging some display related issues.   Some special notes: Behavior of DRM subsystem is different between L4.x and L5.x. For L4.x, you can capture the RGB buffer without any problem. But, there’ s no API for YUV (multi-plane) buffer. To capture YUV, need to apply “ kernel_0001-drm-Add-getfb2-ioctl_L4.14.98.patch ” . For L5.x, mapping/capturing the internal buffer is not allowed by default due to security reason. A simple change in “ 0001-drm-enable-mapping-of-internal-object-for-debugging_L5.x.patch ” can disable this guard. Capture raw data only. RGB and YUV (packed/planar, 420/422) supported. Support de-tile on “ Amphion tile ” (VPU, NV12 only) and “ Super tile ” (Vivante GPU). Please use “ -t ” to enable this. Other tile might not be supported. This is a static linked binary. You can run it on any ARM64 based Linux/Android system in theory (prerequisites in item #1). If you need source code, come to me.   To get more details on how to use it, use “ -? ” option: DRM screen capture DRM based screen capture program Usage:     ./drmfbcap [OP] [ARG] [OP] OPeration (optional):     -v Show version.     -? Show help information.     -i Show information about target DRM device only (no capture).     -t Perform de-tile for tile format.     -d DRM device to open. [ARG] should contain the path to the device node. Default: '/dev/dri/card0'     -o Output folder. [ARG] should contain the path to the output folder. Default: '.'     -p Specific plane # to capture. [ARG] should contain the plane number. If no '-p' specified, capture all planes   Example:     ./drmfbcap   Capture all planes on default DRM device.     ./drmfbcap -d /dev/dri/controlD64   Capture all planes on '/dev/dri/controlD64' device.     ./drmfbcap -p 44 -t -o /sdcard   Capture plane 44, do de-tile after capture and then output to /sdcard/.   Raw buffer capture will be done for each enabled/target plane and one file for each. Captured file will be saved to './' if not specified. --- By Gopise, 2022/08
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  Background PCIe interface of Android 12 prebuilt and Built image on iMX8MM mini is not coming up. The Android BSP doesn't enable the pcie driver. Solution 1. imx8mm_gki.fragment CONFIG_PHY_FSL_IMX_PCIE=m CONFIG_PCI_IMX6=m 2. device/nxp/imx8m/evk_8mm/SharedBoardConfig.mk $(KERNEL_OUT)/drivers/pci/controller/dwc/pci-imx6.ko \ Result evk_8mm:/ # dmesg | grep pci [ 0.561609] ehci-pci: EHCI PCI platform driver [ 6.515345] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: supply epdev_on not found, using dummy regulator [ 6.524925] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: EXT REF_CLK is used!. [ 6.560211] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: PCIe PLL locked after 20 us. [ 6.567328] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: host bridge /soc@0/pcie@33800000 ranges: [ 6.584463] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: IO 0x001ff80000..0x001ff8ffff -> 0x0000000000 [ 6.593833] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: MEM 0x0018000000..0x001fefffff -> 0x0018000000 [ 6.603140] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: invalid resource [ 6.708123] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: Link up [ 6.713393] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: Link up [ 6.718586] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: Link up, Gen1 [ 6.832372] imx6q-pcie 33800000.pcie: PCI host bridge to bus 0000:00 [ 6.840023] pci_bus 0000:00: root bus resource [bus 00-ff] [ 6.846535] pci_bus 0000:00: root bus resource [io 0x0000-0xffff] [ 6.853805] pci_bus 0000:00: root bus resource [mem 0x18000000-0x1fefffff] [ 6.861601] pci 0000:00:00.0: [16c3:abcd] type 01 class 0x060400 [ 6.868529] pci 0000:00:00.0: reg 0x10: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff] [ 6.876439] pci 0000:00:00.0: reg 0x38: [mem 0x00000000-0x0000ffff pref] [ 6.884101] pci 0000:00:00.0: supports D1 [ 6.888954] pci 0000:00:00.0: PME# supported from D0 D1 D3hot D3cold [ 6.899174] pci 0000:01:00.0: [1b4b:2b42] type 00 class 0x020000 [ 6.906127] pci 0000:01:00.0: reg 0x10: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff 64bit pref] [ 6.914221] pci 0000:01:00.0: reg 0x18: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff 64bit pref] [ 6.922740] pci 0000:01:00.0: supports D1 D2 [ 6.927854] pci 0000:01:00.0: PME# supported from D0 D1 D3hot D3cold [ 6.935200] pci 0000:01:00.0: 2.000 Gb/s available PCIe bandwidth, limited by 2.5 GT/s PCIe x1 link at 0000:00:00.0 (capable of 4.000 Gb/s with 5.0 GT/s PCIe x1 link) [ 6.962608] pci 0000:00:00.0: BAR 0: assigned [mem 0x18000000-0x180fffff] [ 6.970251] pci 0000:00:00.0: BAR 15: assigned [mem 0x18100000-0x182fffff pref] [ 6.978426] pci 0000:00:00.0: BAR 6: assigned [mem 0x18300000-0x1830ffff pref] [ 6.986479] pci 0000:01:00.0: BAR 0: assigned [mem 0x18100000-0x181fffff 64bit pref] [ 7.001517] pci 0000:01:00.0: BAR 2: assigned [mem 0x18200000-0x182fffff 64bit pref] [ 7.010203] pci 0000:00:00.0: PCI bridge to [bus 01-ff] [ 7.016271] pci 0000:00:00.0: bridge window [mem 0x18100000-0x182fffff pref] [ 7.025830] pcieport 0000:00:00.0: PME: Signaling with IRQ 238 [ 7.033786] pcieport 0000:00:00.0: AER: enabled with IRQ 238  
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Before I have presentation named “ i.MX6 SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo ”  in following link. i.MX Development Miscellanea(i.MX 开发杂记) - NXP Community   Now I have the “ i.MX8MM SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo ” .   The big difference is i.MX8MM using spl. And in the “ i.MX6 SDCARD Secondary Boot Demo ” I manually edit the secondary image table and manually combine the images. Now, I have written done a script “ imx_sd_secondary_boot_creator.sh ” to do above.
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SWUpdate: Embedded Systems become more and more complex. Software for Embedded Systems have new features and fixes can be updated in a reliable way. Most of time, we need OTA(Over-The-Air) to upgrade the system. Like Android has its own update system. Linux also need an update system. SWUpdate project is thought to help to update an embedded system from a storage media or from network. However, it should be mainly considered as a framework, where further protocols or installers (in SWUpdate they are called handlers) can be easily added to the application. Mongoose daemon mode: Mongoose is a daemon mode of SWUpdate that provides a web server, web interface and web application. Mongoose is running on the target board(i.MX8MM EVK/i.MX8QXP MEK).Using Web browser to access it.   Suricatta daemon mode: Suricatta regularly polls a remote server for updates, downloads, and installs them. Thereafter, it reboots the system and reports the update status to the server. The screenshot is SWUpdate scuricatta working with hawkbit server.          
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On behalf of Gopise Yuan. A collection of several GST debugging tips and known-how. When you need to play onto a DRM layer/plane directly without going through compositor, kmssink should be a good choice: // kmssink, with scale and adjust alpha property (opaque) and zpos (this requires kmssink>=1.16): gst-launch-1.0 filesrc location=/media/AVC-AAC-720P-3M_Alan.mov ! decodebin ! imxvideoconvert_g2d ! kmssink plane-id=37 render-rectangle="<100,100,720,480>" can-scale=false plane-properties=s,alpha=65535,zpos=2 When using playbin, you can still customize the pipeline besides the sink plugin, e.g. add a converter plugin: // Playbin with additional customization on converter before sink: gst-launch-1.0 playbin uri=file:///mnt/MP4_H264_AAC_1920x1080.mp4 video-sink="imxvideoconvert_g2d ! video/x-raw,format=BGRA,width=1920,height=1080 ! kmssink plane-id=44" GST can generate a pipeline graph for analyzing the pipeline in a intuitive manner: // Generate pipeline graph: 1. Export GST_DEBUG_DUMP_DOT_DIR=<dump-folder>, GST_DEBUG=4 2. Run pipeline with gst-launch or others. 3. Copy all dump files (.dot) from <dump-folder>. Note: one dump file will be created for each state transaction. Normally, what we need will be PAUSE_READY or READY_PAUSE, after which pipeline has been setup. 4. Convert the .dot file to PDF with Graphviz: dot -Tpdf 0.00.03.685443250-gst-launch.PAUSED_READY.dot > pipeline_PAUSED_READY.pdf  
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  Anyone who want to use this solution should get reference design and firmware from Lontium. Hardware Here is the block diagram of LT9611UXC Demo Board. As the MIPI port of our EVK can provide 5V, 3V3 and 1V8.We can remove useless DC-DC chips from reference design. Below is the LT9611UXC Demo Board. Software Download the firmware into LT9611UXC. In Linux side, we need to drive the MIPI to output signals with standard timings of 1080P. Panel type diff --git a/arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/imx8mp-evk.dts b/arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/imx8mp-evk.dts index 1732b5c72380..c6a829be541f 100644 --- a/arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/imx8mp-evk.dts +++ b/arch/arm64/boot/dts/freescale/imx8mp-evk.dts @@ -696,13 +716,17 @@ &ldb_phy { &mipi_dsi { status = "okay"; + panel@0{ + compatible = "nxp,lt9611uxc"; + reg = <0>; + status = "okay"; }; }; &snvs_pwrkey { diff --git a/drivers/gpu/drm/panel/panel-simple.c b/drivers/gpu/drm/panel/panel-simple.c index 4f78bbf63f33..90d99f12515b 100644 --- a/drivers/gpu/drm/panel/panel-simple.c +++ b/drivers/gpu/drm/panel/panel-simple.c @@ -4997,6 +4997,34 @@ struct panel_desc_dsi { unsigned int lanes; }; +static const struct drm_display_mode lt9611_panel_mode = { + .clock = 148500, + .hdisplay = 1920, + .hsync_start = 1920 + 88, + .hsync_end = 1920 + 88 + 44, + .htotal = 1920 + 88 + 44 + 148, + .vdisplay = 1080, + .vsync_start = 1080 + 4, + .vsync_end = 1080 + 4 + 5, + .vtotal = 1080 + 4 + 5 + 36, +}; + +static const struct panel_desc_dsi lt9611_panel = { + .desc = { + .modes = &lt9611_panel_mode, + .num_modes = 1, + .bpc = 8, + .size = { + .width = 62, + .height = 110, + }, + .connector_type = DRM_MODE_CONNECTOR_DSI, + }, + .flags = MIPI_DSI_MODE_VIDEO_HSE | MIPI_DSI_MODE_VIDEO | MIPI_DSI_MODE_NO_EOT_PACKET | MIPI_DSI_MODE_VIDEO_SYNC_PULSE, + .format = MIPI_DSI_FMT_RGB888, + .lanes = 4, +}; + static const struct drm_display_mode auo_b080uan01_mode = { .clock = 154500, .hdisplay = 1200, @@ -5201,6 +5229,9 @@ static const struct panel_desc_dsi osd101t2045_53ts = { static const struct of_device_id dsi_of_match[] = { { + .compatible = "nxp,lt9611uxc", + .data = &lt9611_panel, + },{ .compatible = "auo,b080uan01", .data = &auo_b080uan01 }, {
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Some customer need to test ENET IEEE1588 1pps ouput signal. This article describe all i.MX8 serials test procedure, including normal ENET port and EQOS port(i.MX8MP & i.MX8DXL support EQOS).
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some industry customer to use i.MX8MM will use RMII to link the 100Mhz ethernet phy and wish to use our i.mx8mm output 50Mhz reference clock to external phy to save a crystal, this doc and patch explain how to support it. SW: Linux BSP 5.10.17. HW: i.MX8MM LPDDR/DDR EVK board. 中文版本为一个完整的如何支持一个100Mhz以太网PHY  
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1.   Intro   This document contains instructions to run run the SAI low power audio demo on the i.MX 8M Plus EVK. Here, the  RPSMG to allows audio to be passed from the A53 cluster running Linux to the M7 core. The latter controls the on board WM8960 audio codec,  which is connected to a 3.5 mm audio jack that allow us to play music using headphones. I will show the necessary steps to make the demo work and will add some GStreamer examples to demonstrate the demo's capabilities.   TBD: update this with a nice diagram that depicts the A53 and M7 RPMSG channel. 2.   Requirements   Hardware  MX 8M Plus EVK Headphones with 3.5 mm audio jack Type-C power supply for i.MX 8M Plus EVK Micro USB to USB adapter cable Software  A recent prebuilt Linux BSP image from   NXP.com   ( we tested this on 5.15.35 and 5.15.5 releases) Windows 10 or Ubuntu 20.04 Workstation MCUXpresso SDK for i.MX 8M Plus ( available from:    Welcome | MCUXpresso SDK Builder (nxp.com)) 3.   Reference documentation for this example   MCUXpresso SDK   [1] Getting Started with MCUXpresso SDK for EVK-MIMX8MP     Available within the MCUXpresso SDK package:  \{INSTALL PATH}\SDK_X_X_X_EVK-MIMX8MP\docs    [2] SAI low power audio README file Contains instructions for the SAI Low Power Audio Demo.  Available within the MCUXpresso SDK package: \{INSTALL PATH}\SDK_X_X_X_EVK-MIMX8MP\boards\evkmimx8mp\demo_apps\sai_low_power_audio   4.   Downloading a pre-built Linux BSP image for the i.MX 8M Plus   I will make use of the prebuilt Linux Image for the i.MX 8M Plus EVK for demonstrating the demo works.  At the moment of writing this time, I used the 5.15.32 release, although there are older releases like 5.10.5 that I tested and proved to work with no issues. This SAI Low Power Audio Demo shall work for other processors on the i.MX 8M family. Although specific instructions ( e.g. load address for M-core binary load) might require some adaptation. For M-core load address, please refer to the specific MCUXpresso SDK documentation for each processor. The prebuilt Linux image (5.15.32) for the i.MX 8M Plus EVK can be downloaded from here: https://www.nxp.com/webapp/Download?colCode=L5.15.32_2.0.0_MX8MP&appType=license You can download other releases from here:   Embedded Linux for i.MX Applications Processors | NXP Semiconductors   . Select a version and a board and select download. 5.   Flashing the BSP image   If you are using an Ubuntu 20.04 workstation, I recommend you to flash the image using dd. For this, you can refer to the i.MX Linux User's Guide: Section - 4.3.2 Copying the full SD card image -   https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/IMX_LINUX_USERS_GUIDE.pdf sudo dd if=.wic of=/dev/sdx bs=1M && sync NOTE: when using dd, ALWAYS, double check the of device that you are about to writing. Messing up with another location or partition will harm your system   If you are following this document on a Windows machine: You can use the Universal Update Utility (UUU) to flash your image on either the board's eMMC or SD card. Document named UUU.pdf shall serve as your reference guide for further instructions and flashing examples. It is available along with UUU binary here:   https://github.com/NXPmicro/mfgtools/releases Two examples are shown below for your convenience:                                     SD card flash                                                 uuu -b sd_all bootloader rootfs.sdcard.bz2                                     eMMC flash                                                 uuu -b emmc_all bootloader rootfs.sdcard.bz2        uuu uuu.auto NOTE: UUU is also compatible with Ubuntu NOTE: there are other engineers who like to use BalenaEtcher for flashing their BSP images. I have tested it and works on both Ubuntu and Windows 10 machines.   6.   Preparing the BSP and booting up M7 core  using U-Boot   I am writing this upon the instructions contained on the README file for the low power audio example  [2]. Instructions ready to copy and paste will follow:   Instruct U-Boot to pass to the kernel the rpmsg device tree to enable communication between the A53 cluster and the M7 one: u-boot=>setenv fdtfile imx8mp-evk-rpmsg.dtb u-boot=>saveenv Load the M7 example: u-boot=>setenv mmcargs 'setenv bootargs ${jh_clk} console=${console} root=${mmcroot} snd_pcm.max_alloc_per_card=134217728' u-boot=>saveenv Now, we need to load the M4 with the demo. Refer to [1] for further information. If running the BSP on an SD card, make sure the example binary is listed on the boot partition as follows: fatls mmc 1:1 You shall see something similar to this:             imx8mp_m7_TCM_sai_low_power_audio.bin Open the serial terminal emulator for the M7. Out of the fourth ports listed when we plug the i.MX 8M Plus serial debug cable to the PC, the M7 is typically the last one listed.   All the serial ports available to the workstation when the i.MX 8M Plus serial cable is connected to it. NOTE: you may require to install addtitional COM drivers if you are running on Windows. I like doing the previous step so I can see the result of the next commands issued in U-boot to load the M7 image. fatload mmc 1:1 0x48000000 imx8mp_m7_TCM_sai_low_power_audio.bin; cp.b 0x48000000 0x7e0000 20000; bootaux 0x7e0000 Here is an screenshot that shows how the U-Boot's response should look: U-Boot response when loading the SAI low power audio example to the Cortex M7 That should have prompted the following message on the M7 terminal: M7-core is up!   Now, let’s move to user space! u-boot=> boot 7.   Testing the example using a simple GStreamer pipeline   As soon as the O.S. finishes booting. We can see that M7 terminal prompts the following: M7 is now in STOP mode; waiting for some audio to beat the room! Confirm that the WM8960 is listed as audio card as follows: cat /proc/asound/cards             Listing avaialable audio cards. WM8960 should be present. Make note of the list. The wm8960 is listed a the third sound card. This is where I like to differ a bit from [2] and I suggest a quicker test in case of not having an audio file ready. We just simply use GStreamer to play an audiotest source. Please make sure to plug in your headphones onto the board’s 3.5 mm jack before.   The following GStreamer pipeline is using the WM8960 as an audiosink.  gst-launch-1.0 audiotestsrc ! alsasink device=hw:3   NOTE: please be cautious and not put the headphones directly in your head at the first attempt. The sound can be too loud to some people. This is what you should see on the M7 side: Stop the GStreamer pipeline issuing CTRL + C. M7 shall warn you about that: NOTE: you can use the aplay command to play audio as shown on [2]. However, I consider using a testsrc is much quicker and flexible for a quick test.  8.   Additional information   Feel free to go ahead and tweak the GStreamer pipeline to change audio test source properties. audiotest src. This command will let you know the available options:            gst-inspect-1.0 audiotestsrc                         NOTE: you can navigate through the displayed list using the “d”key. Press “q’’ to quit. For example:     For example, I am reproducing sound using a different setup based on the list above: gst-launch-1.0 audiotestsrc freq=4000 volume=0.8 wave=8 ! alsasink device=hw:3 9.    Errata and future updates   TBD:     Add an example on how to define the default audio card and play the audio either using gst-play or building the pipeline using filesrc Comment on the limitations of the M7 core regarding sample rate and audio formats  
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The IOMUX module on i.MX 8M enables flexible I/O multiplexing, allowing users to configure each IO pad as one of selectable functions. The CSU (Central Security Unit) module on i.MX 8M can be used to configure some devices as secure only accessible to protect the security of these devices. But as the IOMUX is Non-Secure accessilbe and thus the pad function can be configured dynamicaly, there is one risk if hackers reconfigure the IO pad to make the device connected to other controller which is accessible to Non-Secure world. One solution for this issue is configuring the CSU to limit Non-Secure access to IOMUX, all IOMUX registers write operations are routed to Trusty OS. In the Trusty OS, add all sensitive IO resources to one blacklist, the IOMUX driver in Trusty OS should check and deny any write attemption to sensitive registers from Non-Secure world. One example patch set is attached to show how to assign the IOMUX to secure world and how to route the IOMUX write operations to Trusty OS. In this example, the USB Host pinctrl PAD on i.MX8MP EVK was assigned to secure world. The layout of the example codes are:     . ├── atf │ └── 0001-config-iomux-to-secure-write.patch --> ${MY_ANDROID}/vendor/nxp-opensource/arm-trusted-firmware ├── kernel │ └── 0001-Use-Trusty-OS-to-handle-iomux-registers-written-oper.patch --> ${MY_ANDROID}/vendor/nxp-opensource/kernel_imx/ ├── trusty │ └── 0001-Add-iomux-pinctrl-TEE-handler.patch --> ${MY_TRUSTY}/trusty/hardware/nxp └── u-boot └── 0001-Use-Trusty-OS-to-handle-IOMUX-operation.patch --> ${MY_ANDROID}/vendor/nxp-opensource/uboot-imx      
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BSP: L5.15.5_1.0.0 Platform: i.MX8MPlus EVK Background   The function lpddr4_mr_read in BSP always return zero and this casue the customer can't use it to read MR registers in DRAM. This is a simple demo for reading MR registers. Patch Code   diff --git a/arch/arm/include/asm/arch-imx8m/ddr.h b/arch/arm/include/asm/arch-imx8m/ddr.h index 0f1e832c03..fd68996a23 100644 --- a/arch/arm/include/asm/arch-imx8m/ddr.h +++ b/arch/arm/include/asm/arch-imx8m/ddr.h @@ -721,6 +721,8 @@ int wait_ddrphy_training_complete(void); void ddrphy_init_set_dfi_clk(unsigned int drate); void ddrphy_init_read_msg_block(enum fw_type type); +unsigned int lpddr4_mr_read(unsigned int mr_rank, unsigned int mr_addr); + void update_umctl2_rank_space_setting(unsigned int pstat_num); void get_trained_CDD(unsigned int fsp); diff --git a/board/freescale/imx8mp_evk/spl.c b/board/freescale/imx8mp_evk/spl.c index 33bbbc09ac..85e40ffbbe 100644 --- a/board/freescale/imx8mp_evk/spl.c +++ b/board/freescale/imx8mp_evk/spl.c @@ -150,6 +150,40 @@ int board_fit_config_name_match(const char *name) return 0; } #endif +void lpddr4_get_info() +{ + int i = 0, attempts = 5; + + unsigned int ddr_info = 0; + unsigned int regs[] = { 5, 6, 7, 8 }; + + for(i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(regs); i++){ + unsigned int data = 0; + data = lpddr4_mr_read(0xF,regs[i]); + ddr_info <<= 8; + ddr_info += (data & 0xFF); + switch (i) + { + case 0: + printf("DRAM INFO : Manufacturer ID = 0x%x",ddr_info); + if(ddr_info & 0Xff) + printf(", Micron\n"); + break; + case 1: + printf("DRAM INFO : Revision ID1 = 0x%x\n",ddr_info); + break; + case 2: + printf("DRAM INFO : Revision ID2 = 0x%x\n",ddr_info); + break; + case 3: + printf("DRAM INFO : I/O Width and Density = 0x%x\n",ddr_info); + break; + default: + break; + } + } + +} void board_init_f(ulong dummy) { @@ -187,6 +221,8 @@ void board_init_f(ulong dummy) /* DDR initialization */ spl_dram_init(); + + lpddr4_get_info(); board_init_r(NULL, 0); } diff --git a/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c b/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c index 326b92d784..f45eeaf552 100644 --- a/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c +++ b/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c @@ -194,8 +194,15 @@ unsigned int lpddr4_mr_read(unsigned int mr_rank, unsigned int mr_addr) tmp = reg32_read(DRC_PERF_MON_MRR0_DAT(0)); } while ((tmp & 0x8) == 0); tmp = reg32_read(DRC_PERF_MON_MRR1_DAT(0)); - tmp = tmp & 0xff; reg32_write(DRC_PERF_MON_MRR0_DAT(0), 0x4); + + while (tmp) { //try to find a significant byte in the word + if (tmp & 0xff) { + tmp &= 0xff; + break; + } + tmp >>= 8; + } return tmp; }     Test Result  
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BSP: L5.15.5_1.0.0   Platform: i.MX8MPlus EVK   1. Parameter preparation For more parameter calculation, please refer to: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/iMX-8M- Mini-Register-Programming-Aid-DRAM-PLL-setting/ta-p/111209  For 1866MHz LPDDR4, we need a DRAM PLL size of 466.5MHz. The PLL dividing parameters are shown in the table below: m=311,p=8,s=1.   2. Calibration and stress test with DDR Tool 2.1 Creating a test script for 1866MHz Here we copy the script from another file (e.g. 2000MHz) and modify the contents of the script.   2.2 Modify the script to adapt to 1866MHz 2.3 Download the test script After selecting the ddr script we created, click on the download button The DDR Tool will use the script to set the registers and you can see that we have a DDR clock size of 932 here (which is twice the size of 466.5). 2.4 Calibrating the stress test Set the core clock of the chip's cpu to 1.2GHz, then click the Calibration button to calibrate, then click Gen Code to generate the lpddr4_timing.c file. Set the start frequency to 932MHz for the stress test. 2.5 Modify lpddr4_timing.c We need to modify the generated lpddr4_timing.c file to change the maximum speed to 3732MHz.   3. SPL patch After getting the correct lpddr4_timing.c file, the SPL code also needs to be modified to add support for the 466.5MHz DRAM PLL. diff --git a/arch/arm/mach-imx/imx8m/clock_imx8mm.c b/arch/arm/mach-imx/imx8m/clock_imx8mm.c index e39f238fdf...5622a6334e 100644 --- a/arch/arm/mach-imx/imx8m/clock_imx8mm.c +++ b/arch/arm/mach-imx/imx8m/clock_imx8mm.c @@ -55,6 +55,7 @@ static struct imx_int_pll_rate_table imx8mm_fracpll_tbl[] = { PLL_1443X_RATE(650000000U, 325, 3, 2, 0), PLL_1443X_RATE(600000000U, 300, 3, 2, 0), PLL_1443X_RATE(594000000U, 99, 1, 2, 0), + PLL_1443X_RATE(466500000U, 311, 8, 1, 0), PLL_1443X_RATE(400000000U, 400, 3, 3, 0), PLL_1443X_RATE(2660000U, 266, 3, 3, 0), PLL_1443X_RATE(167000000U, 334, 3, 4, 0), diff --git a/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c b/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c index 326b92d784..ebd005bc2b 100644 --- a/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c +++ b/drivers/ddr/imx/imx8m/ddrphy_utils.c @@ -117,6 +117,10 @@ void ddrphy_init_set_dfi_clk(unsigned int drate) dram_pll_init(MHZ(1000)); dram_disable_bypass(); break; + case 3732: + dram_pll_init(MHZ(466.5)); + dram_disable_bypass(); + break; case 3200: dram_pll_init(MHZ(800)); dram_disable_bypass();   4. Test results   Reference blog. DDR Tool: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX-8M-Family-DDR-Tool-Release/ta-p/1104467  RPA: https://community.nxp.com/t5/i-MX-Processors-Knowledge-Base/i-MX-8MPlus-m865S-DDR-Register-Programming-Aids-RPA/ta-p/1235352 
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Many customer set GPIO as input or output functions. While they are confused on how to set GPIO property. This article describe on GPIO property setting tips, especially that input and out property setting are different. 
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