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This demonstration is based on RFIDDiscover full version and Pegoda EV710. You may refer to the following links for more details. RFIDDiscover | NXP  PEGODA Contactless Smart Card Reader | NXP  Before start the demonstration, please connect Pegoda with your PC via USB and place the MIFARE DESFire Light card on the reader. The history and log can be fetched from the attachment. Please refer to the video for more details.  
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MIFARE DESFire Light read and write demonstration
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This post contains a guide of how to use the NFC Reader Library with LPC845 using the Basic Discovery Loop example. The vanilla Basic Discovery Loop example is larger than the flash size of LPC845 (64KB), so the project needs to be reduced in size as well. How to reduce the size is explained in section “Porting the NFC Reader Library and reducing the size of project” A ready to use package “lpcxpresso845max_Basic_Discovery_Loop” example from the NFC Reader Library to be run on LPC845 and CLRC663 plus frontend is attached with this document. This document is structured as follows:   Overview of LPC845 The LPCXpresso-MAX family of boards provides a powerful and flexible development system for NXP's low-end Arm® Cortex®-M0+ based MCUs. They can be used with a range of development tools, including the MCUXpresso IDE toolchain. The LPCXpresso845-MAX board was created to enable evaluation of and prototyping with the LPC84x family of MCUs. Based on the Arm® Cortex®-M0+ core, LPC845 is a low-cost, 32-bit MCU family operating at frequencies of up to 30 MHz. The LPC845 MCU contains 64 KB of flash memory and 16 KB of SRAM.  Hardware Requirements Following hardware is required to run the project: LPCXpresso845-MAX development board. CLEV6630B board or BLE-NFC-V2 board. Both boards contain CLRC663 plus frontend. Here we use BLE-NFC-V2.   Connections Connect the two boards as follows: Porting the NFC Reader Library and reducing the size of Project: The porting of Basic Discovery Loop Example (NFC Reader Library) to LPC845 Max was done following the procedure mentioned in “NFC Reader Library Porting to i.MX RT1050” document. However, after completing the porting and building the project, the size of the binary, which is 134.264 KB, is greater than the size of Flash of LPC845 which is 64KB of flash. To reduce the size of the project, the following two steps were taken: 1. Apply compiler optimization for size. This can be done in the MCUXpresso by: Opening properties of project. Right Click project-   >Properties Go to Settings->Optimization. For Optimization Level choose “Optimize for Size” Building the project after this step results in a successful build but the project takes up 93% of all Flash, leaving very little space for adding more functionality. 2. The vanilla Basic discovery loop example detects all types of NFC tags. This increases our code size, so further size reduction can be achieved by limiting the number of protocols used. To limit our Basic Discovery loop to only look for Type A tags, do the following: Open the file “ph_NxpBuild_App.h” file which is inside in the “intfs” folder. This file defines the protocols (types) which are detected by the Basic Discovery Loop example. The type A cards uses the “ISO 14443-3A” protocol, so comment out all other protocol definitions except for “ISO 14443-3A” protocol as shown in Figure.   Building the project after this step  takes up only 42.784KB of space consuming 65% of the Flash, leaving sufficient amount of space for adding application code.   Running Basic Discovery Loop on LPC845 If this is the first time you’re using the LPCXpresso845 Max board, follow the getting started guide first ->  LPC845Max | NXP . Make sure to install the SDK package LPCXpresso845 Max which is required for the project below to run. Download the “lpcxpresso845max_Basic_Discovery_Loop” package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to the “Project Explorer” tab of your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE ) Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: After step 4, the project should be running now. The output “BasicDiscoveryLoop Example” can be seen in the console. The project contains basic discovery loop functionality. Bring any NFC card near the frontend’s RF antenna and the output console will show the detection and type of the card. Running other examples from NFC Reader Library on LPC845: Once the “lpcxpresso845max_Basic_Discovery_Loop” project is running on the LPC845, running other examples from NFC Reader Library is simple. Here we use the “NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C” example from the reader library to describe the process. In “intfs” folder remove everything except the “phaApp_Init.h” file. Then go to the “intfs” folder of the NFC Reader Library example you want to run (“NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C” in this case), and copy all the files except “phaApp_Init.h” and paste them in the original “intfs” folder.  I n line 57 of the “ph_NxpBuild_App.h” file in “intfs” folder, replace  Go to “source” folder and remove every file except “phApp_Init.c“ and “semihost_hardfault.c” files. Then go to “src” folder of the example you want to run (“NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C” in this case) and copy all the files except “phaApp_Init.c” and paste them into the “source” folder.  Finally, copy the main file of the example you want to run (NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C in this case) and paste it into the “source” folder as well. The project is ready to build and run on LPC845. Available Resources: Porting NFC Reader Library to i.MX RT1050. (Detailed Description of porting) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341843 NFC Reader Library  NFC Reader Library | NXP  LPC845 Max  LPCXpresso845-MAX Board for LPC84x Microcontrollers (MCUs) | NXP 
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DISCLAIMER APPLICABLE TO THIS DOCUMENT CONTENTS: This post contains a guide of how to use i.MXRT1050 demoboard with other NXP demoboards to demonstrate Secure access to industrial IOT, using NFC, embedded secure element and MCU (see picture below). A ready to use package including preparation of a secure element, and of a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card can be used as 3-step authentication example using symmetric AES keys; a session key will be generated inside SE050 which will be exported to i.MXRT1050 which will handle contactless communication thru CLRC663 plus frontend. This document is structured as follows: Hardware Requirements: Following hardware is required to run the project: i.MXRT1050 EVKB development board plus referred TFT LCD Display BLE-NFC-V2 arduino-friendly board. OM-SE050ARD, embedded secure element arduino-friendly R3 board. 1. Overview of i.MXRT1050 EVKB: The i.MXRT1050 EVKB development board provides the ideal platform for evaluation of and development with the i.MX RT1050 crossover processor, featuring NXP’s advanced implementation of the Arm ® Cortex ® -M7 core. The i.MX RT1050 EVK is a 4-layer through-hole USB-powered PCB. The board includes a high performance onboard debug probe, audio subsystem and accelerometer, with several options for adding off-the-shelf add-on boards for networking, sensors, display and other interfaces. This core operates at speeds up to 600 MHz to provide high CPU performance and best real-time response. Support for Amazon FreeRTOS ™ available within the MCUXpresso SDK.The i.MX RT1050 EVK board is now supported by Arm ® Mbed ™ OS and Zephyr ™ OS, both open source embedded operating systems for developing the Internet of Things. i.MXRT1050 EVKB board supported devices Processors and Microcontrollers i.MX RT Series i.MX-RT1050 : i.MX RT1050 Crossover Processor with Arm ® Cortex ® -M7 core Sensors 6-Axis FXOS8700CQ : Digital Motion Sensor - 3D Accelerometer (±2g/±4g/±8g) + 3D Magnetometer Interfaces USB PD-PHY and CC-Logic PTN5110 : USB PD TCPC PHY IC Power Management Load Switches NX3P190UK : Logic controlled high-side power switch NX5P3090UK : USB PD and type C current-limited power switch The i.MXRT1050 EVKB is fully supported by the MCUXpresso suite of tools, which provides device drivers, middleware and examples to allow rapid development, plus configuration tools and an optional free IDE. MCUXpresso software is compatible with tools from popular tool vendors such as Arm and IAR, and the i.MXRT1050 EVKB may also be used with the popular debug probes available from SEGGER and P&E Micro. As final touch to this demonstrator, one LCD display will be added in order to show "access control" check result when approaching a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card to the Reader antenna, without the use of a computer console.Connection between i.MXRT1050 EVKB board and LCD Display requires attachment of two flat cables, one for touch-screeen functionality and the other for controlling Display itself. Click here to order Touchscreen LCD Display thru buy direct:                                          P/N: RK043FN02H-CT 12NC:935358709598 2. BLE-NFC-V2: It is easier to use the BLE-NFC-V2 board due to four Arduino compliant male connectors. Current version has only double row-male connectors which imposes that BLE-NFC-V2 board will be the last board stacked on top of other arduino boards. The following figure shows the pin mapping between the two boards. Pin Function i.MXRT1050  (Arduino connector # - Pin #) CLRC663 plus NFC BLE V2 (Arduino connector # - Pin #) MOSI J24-5 MOSI J10-P14 MISO J24-4 MISO J10-P12 SPI CLK J24-6 SCK J10-P10 SPI CS J24-3 SSEL J10-P16 RESET J22-6 CLRCL_NRST J12-P6 IRQ J22-5 IRQ J12-P8 IFSEL0 J24-7 GND IF0 Via R11 IFSEL1 J25-4 VCC IF1 Via R9 GND J25-6 GND GND J11-P11 Connections between i.MXRT1050 EVKB Board and NFC BLE V2 3 OM-SE050ARD: SE050 Arduino ® Compatible Development Kit The OM-SE050ARD is the flexible and easy-to-use development kit for the EdgeLock™ SE050 Plug & Trust product family. It can be used in various ways for example via the Arduino interface compatible to any board featuring an Arduino compatible header, including many i.MX, LPC and Kinetis ® boards, or via a direct I 2 C connection. This kit allows evaluation of the SE050 product family features and simplifies the development of secure IoT applications. More information can be found in the respective Application Note AN12395. Preparing hardware for "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo" at i.MXRT1050 EVKB Reworking i.MXRT1050 EVKB: It is necessary to short circuit 4 empty resistor pads: R278, R279, R280 and R281 – they connect SPI from i.MX1050 until Arduino SPI pads, which will be used by NFC BLE V2 board. Reworking NFC-BLE V2 board: I t is necessary to cut at least one male pin to avoid conflict with OM-SE050ARD board (better would be to cut first 2 pins): Configuring OM-SE050ARD board jumpers: Final HW configuration of these three boards altogether: Since NFC BLE V2 has only male connectors, OMSE050ARD board is first connected to i.MX1050 EVKB, then NFC BLE V2 is plugged on top of this latest pcb. Running "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo" at i.MXRT1050 EVKB:   If this is the first time you’re using i.MXRT1050 EVKB board, follow this link  i.MXRT1050 board overview . Make sure to install the SDK package for i.MXRT1050 EVKB which is required for the project below to run. Download the following zip package Access_RT_v_1_0_18092019.zip. This file is split in two parts and includes 3 functionalities in one MCUxpresso project: Preparation of MFDFEV2 card The touch screen display will offer three functionalities. By default, the first screen will be "Authenticate" functionality. When you choose the arrow to the right, you'll find TAB with word START, that you'll touch when you need to prepare a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card with suitable application and AES keys used for demonstrator. Just place a virgin card on top of Reader antenna, and press "START" button and check with Terminal on MCUxpresso to check sequence of actions to personalize one DESFire EV2 card. You may also use Teraterm to monitor the execution of DESFire card personalization, by inspecting the COM number used by i.MXRT1050 board.     Preparation of SE050 with proper keys    When you choose the arrow to the left once, you'll find TAB with word Authenticate; if you do it again, then you'll the word "START", which you will touch when you need to prepare a virgin OM-SE050ARD demoboardcard with suitable application and AES keys used for demonstrator. Just press "START" button and check with Terminal on MCUxpresso to check sequence of actions to personalize one SE050 board. You may also use Teraterm to monitor the execution of SE050 key provisioning, by inspecting the COM number used by i.MXRT1050 board. After steps 2.a and 2.b have been done to obtain preparation of one Secure element as well as preparation of one MIFARE DESFire EV2 card, then select using < and > keys the Default Display menu, containing word "Authenticate" : just place DESFire EV2 card on top of NFC antenna and press "Authenticate". If the DESFire EV2 card is the one you have personalized, you'll see a Locker icon that will show "Open locker" , that is "Access granted action". If you place other cards, "Locker icon"will stay closed, that is "Access denied". Again, use MCUxpresso Terminal or  use Teraterm to monitor the execution of  DESFire EV2 authentication steps with SE050  by inspecting the COM number used by i.MXRT1050 board. Available Resources: Quick start guide to integration of SE050 with i.MXRT1050 https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN12450.pdf i.MXRT1050 EVKB i.MX RT1050 Evaluation Kit | NXP  BLE-NFC-V2 https://www.nxp.com/products/identification-security/rfid/nfc-hf/nfc-readers/clrc663-iplus-i-and-qn902x-nfc-bluetooth-low-energy-solution-for-consumer-applications:BLE-NFC SE050: www.nxp.com/SE050 In the attachment area, you'll find:  three *.axf files you may use to upload using MCUxpresso and direct firmware flashing functionality to i.MXRT1050 EVKB board. one bundle zip file split in 5 files: hands-on zip, hands-on from .z01 until hands-on.z04, due to maximum limit of 50Megabytes for file uploading to this page. download all 5 files, unzip them in one laptop directory, then you may re-zip them and import in MCUxpresso. They include draft of all three functionalities of secure access to industrial iot hands-on: DESFire EV2 card preparation, SE050 trust provisioning (with keys) and authentication of card with current installed SE050.
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DISCLAIMER APPLICABLE TO THIS DOCUMENT CONTENTS: This post contains a guide of how to use LPC55S69 demoboard with other NXP demoboards to demonstrate Access control using NFC, one embedded secure element and an MCU (see picture below). A ready to use package including preparation of a secure element, and of a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card can be used as 3-step authentication example using symmetric AES keys; a session key will be generated inside SE050 which will be exported to LPC55S69 which will handle contactless communication thru CLRC663 plus frontend. This document is structured as follows: Hardware Requirements: Following hardware is required to run the project: LPC55S69-EVK development board. OM-SE050ARD development board. CLEV6630B board or BLE-NFC-V2 board. 1. Overview of LPC55S69-EVK: The LPCXpresso55S69 development board provides the ideal platform for evaluation of and development with the LPC55S6x MCU based on the Arm® Cortex®-M33 architecture. The board includes a high performance onboard debug probe, audio subsystem and accelerometer, with several options for adding off-the-shelf add-on boards for networking, sensors, displays and other interfaces. The LPCXpresso55S69 is fully supported by the MCUXpresso suite of tools, which provides device drivers, middleware and examples to allow rapid development, plus configuration tools and an optional free IDE. MCUXpresso software is compatible with tools from popular tool vendors such as Arm and IAR, and the LPCXpresso55S69 may also be used with the popular debug probes available from SEGGER and P&E Micro. 2. Overview of OM-SE050ARD demoboard: The OM-SE050ARD is the flexible and easy-to-use development kit for the EdgeLock SE050 Plug & Trust product family. It can be used in various ways for example via the Arduino interface compatible to any board featuring an Arduino compatible header, including many i.MX, LPC and Kinetis boards, or via a direct I 2 C connection. This kit allows evaluation of the SE050 product family features and simplifies the development of secure IoT applications. More information can be found in the respective Application Note AN12395.   2.1 Connections between OM-SE050ARD and LPC55S69 EVK   OM-SE050ARD LPC55S69 (Conn.# - Pin #) Port Function Name SE_SDA (J22-1) P24-6 also P17-3 PIO1_21 FC4_I2C_SDA_ARD SE_SCL (J22-4) P24-5 also P17-1 PIO1_20 FC4_I2C_SCL_ARD +5V_PC (J22-2) VDD_TARGET GND (J22-3) GND 2.2 Jumper settings on OM-SE050ARD to connect it to LPC55S69 EVK Connect SE050 to LPC55S Arduino stackable headers and change jumper J14 as: This connects SE_VDD directly to 3V3 and bypasses enable signal. This is required because enable pin on LPC55S coincides with Silex-2401 SPI pins so we cannot use SE_EN signal to drive SE_VDD. 3. Overview of NFC Front end boards working with LPC55S69 EVK board for this example: 3.1 BLE-NFC-V2: It is easier to use the BLE-NFC-V2 board since less changes have to made on the board as compared to the CLEV6630B board. The following figure shows the pin mapping between the two boards. It is advisable to add a pull-up resistor (4k7 to VCC) on CLRC663 plus signal IRQ. 3.2 CLEV6630B board: The CLEV6630B board consists of CLRC663 plus (NFC frontend) connected by default to an LPC1769 µC via SPI. However, the board is made in such a way that the LPC1769 MCU can be bypassed to connect to an external MCU (in our case the LPC55S69) easily. For doing so: Six resistors from the board need to be removed. These are highlighted in red in the Figure 1: Use the SPI pin connectors available on the left-hand side, on the board edge to connect to external MCU (LPC55S69 in this case) Solder jumper wires onto the following pins of CLEV6630B Board:  GND IRQ CLRC_NRST SSEL MOSI MISO SCK IF0 IF1      The CLEV6630B is shown in Figure 2 after the required changes have been made to it (Removal of resistors and soldering of wires).   Now connect the two boards as follows: Signal function LPC55S69 (conn. # - Pin #) Port CLEV6630B MOSI P17-10 PIO0_20 MOSI MISO P17-12 PIO0_19 MISO SPI SCK P17-14 PIO0_21 SCK SPI CSEL P17-6 PIO1_11 SSEL RESET P18-11 PIO0_15 CLRCL_NRST IRQ P18-3 PIO1_10 IRQ GND P17-7 GND  As final touch to this demonstrator, one LCD display will be added in order to show "access control" check result when approaching a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card to the Reader antenna, without the use of a computer console. Connection between LPC55S69 board and LCD Display: TFT LPC55S69 (Jumper # - Pin #) Port      SPI_CLK D13 (P17-9) PIO1_2      SPI_MISO D12 (P17-11) PIO1_3      SPI_MOSI D11 (P17-13) PIO0_26      SPI_CS_TFT D10 (P17-15) PIO1_1      GPIO_LCD_BL D9 (P17-17) PIO1_5      GPIO_LCD_DC D7 (P18-1) PIO1_9 5V 5V   GND GND   Click here to order 2.8 inch TFT Display from Waveshare: P/N: 2.8 inch TFT Touch Shield Brand     4. Running "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo" at LPC55S69:   If this is the first time you’re using LPC55S69-EVK board, follow the getting started guide first à  LPC55S69-EVK | NXP . Make sure to install the SDK package for LPC55S69-EVKboard which is required for the project below to run. Download the ‘demobinaries.zip' package which you will find attached to this post. This zip file contains 2 bin files: ex_prepareCard.bin - upload this binary file to LPC55S69 when you need to prepare a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card with suitable application and AES keys used for demonstrator. Upload bin file to LPC55S69 by using MCUxpresso. Just place a virgin card on top of Reader antenna, and reset MCU board by clicking on "RESET KEY" push button. ex_prepareSe050.bin - upload this binary file to LPC55S69 when you need to prepare a new SE050 with suitable AES keys to be used in this demo. Just  upload binary using MCUxpresso; connect a virgin OM-SE050ARD on LPC55S69 arduino connectors, connect micro USB connector to MCU board, and reset MCU by clicking "RESET KEY". After steps 2.1 and 2.2 have been done to obtain preparation of one Secure element as well as preparation of one MIFARE DESFire EV2 card, then upload the next bin file to LPC55S69 using MCUxpresso: ex_Ev2Auth_se05x.bin Alternatively, you can import the whole project in your MCUxpresso environment. Download the file EmbeddedWorld2019DemoLatest.zip at end of this page. Import this zip file project in MCUxpresso environment Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: PICTURE TO BE UPDATED MCUXPRESSO PICTURE TO BE UPDATED The project should be running now. The project contains a closed loop that tries to check presence of a card on top of Reader. Here is how the output looks like in LCD Display. Press the button reset, and you will see the text "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo 2019" PICTURE TO BE UPDATED Then press the button "Wake-up". Afterwards NFC reader will enter in a loop in which he will look for a card to authenticate. If there are no cards, he will soon show the red allert with text "Access denied" Bring any NFC card near the frontend’s antenna (or in presence of no card) LCD display will show a message in RED "ACCESS DENIED". PICTURE TO BE UPDATED Only in case the "prepared DESFire EV2" card is placed on top of reader, in the picture below, we can see message in GREEN "ACCESS GRANTED" PICTURE TO BE UPDATED. Available Resources: Porting NFC Reader Library to i.MX RT1050. (Detailed Description of porting) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341843 LPC55S69 https://www.nxp.com/products/processors-and-microcontrollers/arm-based-processors-and-mcus/lpc-cortex-m-mcus/lpc5500-cortex-m33/lpcxpresso55s69-development-board:LPC55S69-EVK BLE-NFC-V2 https://www.nxp.com/products/identification-security/rfid/nfc-hf/nfc-readers/clrc663-iplus-i-and-qn902x-nfc-bluetooth-low-energy-solution-for-consumer-applications:BLE-NFC CLEV6630B Product Information|NXP  SE050: www.nxp.com/SE050
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This post contains a guide of how to use the NFC Reader Library with LPC55S69. A ready to use package for using the “Basic Discovery Loop” example from the NFC Reader Library with LPC55S69 and CLRC663 plus frontend is attached with this document. This document is structured as follows: Overview of LPC55S69: The LPCXpresso55S69 development board provides the ideal platform for evaluation of and development with the LPC55S6x MCU based on the Arm® Cortex®-M33 architecture. The board includes a high performance onboard debug probe, audio subsystem and accelerometer, with several options for adding off-the-shelf add-on boards for networking, sensors, displays and other interfaces. The LPCXpresso55S69 is fully supported by the MCUXpresso suite of tools, which provides device drivers, middleware and examples to allow rapid development, plus configuration tools and an optional free IDE. MCUXpresso software is compatible with tools from popular tool vendors such as Arm and IAR, and the LPCXpresso55S69 may also be used with the popular debug probes available from SEGGER and P&E Micro. Hardware Requirements: Following hardware is required to run the project: LPC55S69-EVK development board. CLEV6630B board or BLE-NFC-V2 board. BLE-NFC-V2: It is easier to use the BLE-NFC-V2 board since it can be just plugged on top of the arduino interface available on the LPCXpresso55S69 board. The following figure shows the pin mapping between the two boards. CLEV6630B board: The CLEV6630B board consists of CLRC663 plus (NFC frontend) connected by default to an LPC1769 µC via SPI. However, the board is made in such a way that the LPC1769 MCU can be bypassed to connect to an external MCU (in our case the LPC55S69) easily. For doing so: Six resistors from the board need to be removed. These are highlighted in red in the Figure 1: Use the SPI pin connectors available on the left-hand side, on the board edge to connect to external MCU (LPC55S69 in this case) Solder jumper wires onto the following pins of CLEV6630B Board:  GND IRQ CLRC_NRST SSEL MOSI MISO SCK IF0 IF1      The CLEV6630B is shown in Figure 2 after the required changes have been made to it (Removal of resistors and soldering of wires).   Now connect the two boards as follows:   Running Basic Discovery Loop on LPC55S69:   If this is the first time you’re using LPC55S69-EVK board, follow the getting started guide first à  LPC55S69-EVK | NXP . Make sure to install the SDK package for LPC55S69-EVKboard which is required for the project below to run. Download either‘lpcxpresso55s69_BasicDiscoveryLoop_CLEV6630b' or ' lpcxpresso55s69_BasicDiscoveryLoop_BLE-NFC ' package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to the “Project Explorer” tab of your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: The project should be running now. The project contains basic discovery loop functionality. Here is how the output looks like in the terminal. Bring any NFC card near the frontend’s antenna and the output console will show the detection and type of the card. For example, in the picture below, we can see that type 4A card was detected:     Running other NFC Reader Library examples on LPC55S69: Once the “lpcxpresso55s69_BasicDiscoveryLoop” project is running on the LPC55S69. Running other examples from is simple. First step is to install the NFC Reader Library : Installing the NFC Reader Library: Go to www.nxp.com/pages/:NFC-READER-LIBRARY Go to the Downloads tab and click on the download button Click download on the NFC Reader Library for Kinetis K82F package. Import the library package in the workspace. The easiest way is to use the Quick Start Panel on the left-hand side: Click on Import project from file system Then, browse the library package in your file system. Click Finish to import it all to your workspace. After completing the import wizard, all projects are listed in the “Project Explorer” window. As can be seen in the screenshot, it contains different folders: API documentation folder Driver Abstraction Layer FreeRTOS support The platform support (in the screenshot, corresponding to the LPC support) The software examples  The Reader Library implementation And the OS abstraction layer   Running "NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C" on LPC55S69: Here we use the “NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C” example from the reader library to describe the method. The same method can be used to run other examples from the NFC Reader Library.  To run "NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C" on LPC55S69, we look at " lpcxpresso55s69_BasicDiscoveryLoop" project (available as a download below) and "NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C" project (from the Reader Library). We make changes to the following folders: In “intfs” folder remove everything except the “phaApp_Init.h” file. Then go to the “intfs” folder of the NFC Reader Library example you want to run (“NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C” in this case), and copy all the files except “phaApp_Init.h” and paste them in the original “intfs” folder. In line 57 of the “ph_NxpBuild_App.h” file in “intfs” folder, replace #if defined(PHDRIVER_LPC1769RC663_BOARD) \     || defined(PHDRIVER_FRDM_K82FRC663_BOARD)\ #   define NXPBUILD__PHHAL_HW_RC663 #endif with #if defined(PHDRIVER_LPC1769RC663_BOARD) \     || defined(PHDRIVER_FRDM_K82FRC663_BOARD)\     || defined(PHDRIVER_LPC55S69RC663_BOARD) #   define NXPBUILD__PHHAL_HW_RC663 #endif Go to “source” folder and remove every file except “phApp_Init.c“ and “semihost_hardfault.c” files. Then go to “src” folder of the example you want to run (“NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C” in this case) and copy all the files except “phaApp_Init.c” and paste them into the “source” folder. Finally, copy the main file of the example you want to run (NfcrdlibEx9_NTagI2C in this case) and paste it into the “source” folder as well. The project is ready to build and run on LPC55S69.       Available Resources: Porting NFC Reader Library to i.MX RT1050. (Detailed Description of porting) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341843 LPC55S69 https://www.nxp.com/products/processors-and-microcontrollers/arm-based-processors-and-mcus/lpc-cortex-m-mcus/lpc5500-cortex-m33/lpcxpresso55s69-development-board:LPC55S69-EVK BLE-NFC-V2 https://www.nxp.com/products/identification-security/rfid/nfc-hf/nfc-readers/clrc663-iplus-i-and-qn902x-nfc-bluetooth-low-energy-solution-for-consumer-applications:BLE-NFC
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This post contains a step by step guide of how to use PN7150 with LPC55S69.  This document is structured as follows: Overview of PN7150:  The PN7150 is a Plug-and-Play all-in-one NFC solution for easy integration into any OS environment like Linux and Android, reducing Bill of Material (BoM) size and cost. The embedded Arm® Cortex®-M0 microcontroller core is loaded with the integrated firmware, simplifying the implementation as all the NFC real-time constraints, protocols and the device discovery (polling loop) are processed internally. In few NCI commands, the host SW can configure the PN7150 to notify for card or peer detection and start communicating with them. It has the following salient features: Full NFC forum compliancy with small form factor antenna Embedded NFC firmware providing all NFC protocols as pre-integrated feature Direct connection to the main host or microcontroller, by I2C-bus physical and NCI protocol Ultra-low power consumption in polling loop mode Highly efficient integrated power management unit (PMU) allowing direct supply from a Battery Overview of LPC55S69:  The LPCXpresso55S69 development board provides the ideal platform for evaluation of and development with the LPC55S6x MCU based on the Arm® Cortex®-M33 architecture. The board includes a high performance onboard debug probe, audio subsystem and accelerometer, with several options for adding off-the-shelf add-on boards for networking, sensors, displays and other interfaces. The LPCXpresso55S69 is fully supported by the MCUXpresso suite of tools, which provides device drivers, middleware and examples to allow rapid development, plus configuration tools and an optional free IDE. MCUXpresso software is compatible with tools from popular tool vendors such as Arm and IAR, and the LPCXpresso55S69 may also be used with the popular debug probes available from SEGGER and P&E Micro. Hardware requirements: OM5578/PN7150ARD  LPCXpresso55S69 + usb  micro cable  Using PN7150 with LPC55S69-EVK: Hardware Connections: The hardware connections are simple. Both the LPC55S69-EVK board and OM5578/PN7150ARD board have an Arduino interface. So, mount the PN7150ARD board with male Arduino connector onto the female Arduino connector of the LPC55S69-EVK board. Running the demo: If this is the first time you’re using LPC55S69-EVK board, follow the getting started guide first à  LPC55S69-EVK | NXP . Make sure to install the SDK package for LPC55S69-EVKboard which is required for the project below to run. Download the ‘NXP-NCI_PN7150_LPC55xx_example’ package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to the “Project Explorer” tab of your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free by clicking here: Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: The project should be running now. The project contains basic discovery loop functionality. Here is how the output looks in the console tab on MCUXpresso: Bring any NFC card near the PN7150 board’s antenna and the output console will show the detection and type of the card. For example, in the picture below, we can see that type 4 card was detected: Available Resources: AN11990 NXP-NCI MCUXpresso example document. (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN11990.pdf) The example project explained in this project was ported to LPC55S69 using section 5.3 and 6 of the above mentioned document. PN7150 datasheet (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/data-sheet/PN7150.pdf) PN7150 User Manual (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/UM10936.pdf) PN7150 NFC Controller SBC Kit User Manual  (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/UM10935.pdf)
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This post contains step by step guide of how to use the NTAG I²C plus with LPC55S69. This is easy and straightforward to do, since the MCUXpresso SDK Builder tool has an option to add NTAG I²C plus example directly to SDK of LPC55S69. Hardware Needed: LPC55S69-EVK NTAG I²C plus explorer kit Follow the following simple steps to use NTAG I²C plus with LPC55S69: Download and install MCUXpresso IDE (if you don’t have it already). It can be download for free by clicking here: Next step is to use the MCUXpresso SDK Builder tool to build and download the SDK for LPC55S69. For this: Go to  the MCUXpresso SDK Builder website: https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/en/select Select the LPC55S69 board and then click on ‘Build MCUXpresso SDK’ button: Click on ‘Add Software component’, then select the NTAG I2C component, click ‘Save changes’ and then download the SDK. Drag and drop the downloaded SDK to the installed SDK’s tab in the MCUXpresso IDE to install it. Click on the ‘Import SDK example(s)’ in the Quickstart Panel in the MCUXpresso IDE. Then select LPC55S69, ‘check the ntag_i2c_plus_example’ box and hit ‘Finish’. Connect the LPC55S69 and NTAG I²C plus boards together. Details of these connections can be found in the “readme.txt” file in the “doc” folder of the project: Finally click on debug in the Quickstart Panel to build the project, flash it to the MCU, and start debugging. This is how the output looks like in the Console tab of IDE: Bring any active nfc device (e.g. an NFC phone with NFC enabled) near the ntagi2c board. The program will detect it and consequently blink the LED as well as display a message on the console: Read the “readme.txt” file for more details regarding the project. Available Resources: BLE pairing with NFC on KW41 and  NTAG I²C plus  source code  www.nxp.com/downloads/en/snippets-boot-code-headers-monitors/SW4223.zip NTAG I²C plus  kit for Arduino pinout  www.nxp.com/demoboard/OM23221ARD
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This post contains a step by step guide of how to use PN7150 with i.MX RT1060. This document is structured as follows: Overview of PN7150 PN7150 is a Plug-and-Play all-in-one NFC solution for easy integration into any OS environment like Linux and Android, reducing Bill of Material (BoM) size and cost. The embedded Arm® Cortex®-M0 microcontroller core is loaded with the integrated firmware, simplifying the implementation as all the NFC real-time constraints, protocols and the device discovery (polling loop) are processed internally. In few NCI commands, the host SW can configure the PN7150 to notify for card or peer detection and start communicating with them. It has the following salient features: Full NFC forum compliancy with small form factor antenna Embedded NFC firmware providing all NFC protocols as pre-integrated feature Direct connection to the main host or microcontroller, by I2C-bus physical and NCI protocol Ultra-low power consumption in polling loop mode Highly efficient integrated power management unit (PMU) allowing direct supply from a Battery Hardware Requirements      1. OM5578/PN7150ARD      2. i.MX RT1060 EVK Evaluation Board + usb micro cable        Using PN7150 with i.MX RT1060 Hardware Connections The hardware connections are simple. Both the EVKB-IMXRT1060 board and OM5578/PN7150ARD board have an Arduino interface. So, mount the PN7150ARD board with male Arduino connector onto the female Arduino connector of the EVKB-IMXRT1060 board.  Running the Demo If this is the first time you’re using EVK-MIMXRT1060 board, follow the getting started guide first:  i.MX RT1060 Evaluation Kit | NXP . Make sure to install the SDK package for EVK-MIMXRT1060 board which is required for the project to run.   Download the ‘evkbimxrt1060_PN7150’ package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to the “Project Explorer” tab of your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: After step 3, the project should be running now. The project contains basic discovery loop functionality. Here is how the output looks in the console tab on MCUXpresso: Bring any NFC card near the PN7150 board’s antenna and the output console will show the detection and type of the card. For example, in the picture below, we can see that type 4 card was detected: Available Resources AN11990 NXP-NCI MCUXpresso example document. (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN11990.pdf) The example project explained in this project was ported to i.MX RT1060 using section 5.3 and 6 of the above mentioned document. PN7150 datasheet (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/data-sheet/PN7150.pdf) PN7150 User Manual (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/UM10936.pdf) PN7150 NFC Controller SBC Kit User Manual  (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/UM10935.pdf)
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SPIM module is one of the master interfaces provided by PN7462 , which is a 32-bit ARM Cortex-M0-based NFC microcontroller, and users may use this interface to connect with up to two SPI slave devices. The NFC reader library provides SPIM driver code in phHal/phhalSPIM, and users may directly use the following APIs in their application to implement simple SPI transaction, just like what is done  in the demo of "PN7462AU_ex_phExHif". While this demo has limitation with some SPI nor flash devices, which need a write-read operation in one NSS session, for example, the SPI nor flash device on OM27462 as below: Please note to solder R202 and connect it to 3V3 to make sure nHold pin has pull-up out of POR. The following is one of the command sets this device supports: This command contains 1 write(9F) followed by 3 read operations in one NSS session, but if you implement it with phhalSPIM_Transmit() and phhalSPIM_Receive() as below: status = phhalSPIM_Transmit(PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_INIT_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_APPEND_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_INIT, 2, cmd_buf, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_OFFSET);    status = phhalSPIM_Receive(PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_INIT_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_INIT, data_length, dst, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_OFFSET);" You will have the following result: expected: NSS   \__________________________/ MOSI     CMD A7-A0 MISO                            DATA       actual:                         NSS   \____________||______________/ MOSI     CMD A7-A0 MISO                           DATA so the pulse between the write and read is the problem, and here we have to handle the NSS line manually, with the help of NSS_VAL and NSS_CONTROL bits in SPIM_CONFIG_REG. so the code should be like this:   Assert NSS   status = phhalSPIM_Transmit(PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_INIT_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_APPEND_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_INIT, 2, cmd_buf, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_OFFSET);    status = phhalSPIM_Receive(PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_INIT_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_INIT, data_length, dst, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_OFFSET);"   De-assert NSS The NSS line assert and de-assert function can be implemented with register bit level APIs, just like below:             PH_REG_SET_BIT(SPIM_CONFIG_REG, NSS_VAL);//de-assert NSS             PH_REG_SET_BIT(SPIM_CONFIG_REG, NSS_CTRL);             PH_REG_CLEAR_BIT(SPIM_CONFIG_REG, NSS_VAL);//assert NSS Please also include the following header files in your application code. #include "ph_Reg.h" #include "PN7462AU/PN7462AU_spim.h" Please notice that phhalSPIM_Transmit() and phhalSPIM_Receive() are Rom based function, which clear NSS_CTRL bit by default. We can not change ROM API's behave but fortunately we have phhalSPIM_TransmitContinue() and phhalSPIM_ReceiveContinue() instead. so the final solution will be like below: Assert NSS   status = phhalSPIM_TransmitContinue(1, cmd_buf);    status = phhalSPIM_ReceiveContinue(3, dst);   De-assert NSS This doesn't mean phhalSPIM_Transmit() and phhalSPIM_Receive() are useless, because they can also help up to configure the SPI master interface, if you don't want to use register bit level API to initial the SPIM module manually. Please note to use 1 byte for write/read length to make these two functions work properly. so the whole pseudo code is like below: phhalSPIM_Init(PH_HW_SPIM_TIMEOUT) ; phhalSPIM_Configure(PH_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_HW_SPIM_MSB_FIRST,                 \                                     PH_HW_SPIM_MODE, PH_HW_SPIM_BAUDRATE,  \                                     PH_HW_SPIM_NSSPULSE, PH_HW_SPIM_NSSPOL) ; status = phhalSPIM_Transmit(PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_INIT_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_APPEND_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_INIT, 1, cmd_buf, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_OFFSET);    status = phhalSPIM_Receive(PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_SLAVE, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_INIT_CRC, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_INIT, 1, dst, PH_EXHIF_HW_SPIM_CRC_OFFSET);" Assert NSS   status = phhalSPIM_TransmitContinue(1, cmd_buf);    status = phhalSPIM_ReceiveContinue(3, dst);   De-assert NSS The following steps show how to create a new project based on NFC reader library, please refer to https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/UM10883.pdf  on how to import the NFC reader library. 1. Create a new project after importing the NFC reader library. 2. if you installed PN7462 support package, you will see this: 3. add a link to NFC reader lib: 4. add path and enable NFC reader lib in the project: 5. delete cr_startup.c and create the main code as well as the header file: 6. Build result: 7.Debug result: To fetch the ready demo, please submit a private ticket via the guide of https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-329745 . Hope that helps, Best regards, Kan
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This post contains step by step guide of how to use NTAG I²C plus with i.MX RT MCUs. The goal of this post is to enable developers to start developing their NFC Applications using NTAG I²C plus and i.MX RT MCUs quickly and easily. Attached with this post are two ready to use packages: ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ is to be used with MIMXRT1060-EVK and NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout. ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ is to be used with MIMXRT1050-EVK and NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout. Both packages contain the same example code but are configured for the two different boards. The example code demonstrates the following basic operations: Reading the EEPROM of NTAG I²C plus. Writing NTAG messages to NTAG I²C plus. Reading SRAM of NTAG I²C plus. Writing to SRAM of NTAG I²C plus. Using Field detect pin as interrupt to turn on an LED when an RF field is detected by the NTAG I²C board. The document has been structured as follows: NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout The NTAG I²C plus Arduino kit consist of two PCBs stacked together: The upper PCB is the antenna board with the connected tag The lower PCB is an interface adaptor board to the Arduino pinout This kit can be used to connect and evaluate the NTAG I²C plus  into many popular MCUs with Arduino compliant headers, for example:  Kinetis (e.g. KW41Z, i.MX (e.g. UDOO Neo, i.MX 6UL, i.MX 6 ULL, i.MX 7D), LPC MCUs (e.g. LPCXpresso MAX, V2 and V3 boards) and i.MX RT boards (e.g. i.MX RT1050, i.MX RT1060) The kit support package includes several software examples. The OM29110ARD is a generic interface board which offers support for connection to any PCB implementing Arduino connectors. It exposes: 3.3V and 5V power supply pins. I2C, SPI and UART host interfaces. Generic GPIOs (e.g. to be used for field detect, interrupts, reset pins or others) As such, it allows the NTAG I²C plus to be plugged into Arduino devices seamlessly. Hardware Requirements EVKB-IMXRT1050 board or EVKB-IMXRT1060 board. NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout (OM23221ARD) Cables: Micro USB cable 6 jumper wires Male to Female (Only required if using EVKB-IMXRT1050 board) Using NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout with EVKB-IMXRT1060 Hardware Connections The hardware connections are simple. Both the EVKB-IMXRT1060 board and OM23221ARD (NTAG I²C plus) board have Arduino interface. So simply connect both as shown in figure:  Running the Demo Follow the below mentioned steps to run the demo: Download the ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ package which you will find attached to this post.  Drag and drop the downloaded package to your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE, click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started click on the run icon to run the code:                                 Note:  If this is your first time using IMXRT1060EVK board, it is recommended to follow the getting started guide first ( i.MX RT1060 Evaluation Kit | NXP  ) To see the output, you need to have a terminal application installed (like Tera term or PuTTY). The output looks like this:                                                    Using NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout with EVKB-IMXRT1050 Hardware Connections In case of EVKB-IMXRT1050, the I2C pins on the Arduino interface’s J24 pin 9 and 10 are only connected to the i.MX RT slave I²C port, not to a master I²C port. So, we cannot just plug in the NTAG I²C plus kit, instead we need to connect two boards with the help of jumper wires. The connections required are show in figure below.                                Running the Demo Download the ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE, click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started click on the run icon to run the code:                                Note:  If this is your first time using IMXRT1050EVK board, it is recommended to follow the getting started guide first ( i.MX RT1050 Evaluation Kit | NXP  ) To see the output, you need to have a terminal application installed (like Tera term or PuTTY). The output looks like this:                                            Porting the Package to any other i.MX RT Boards    If you want to use NTAG I²C plus with i.MX RT boards other than the i.MX RT1050 or the i.MX RT1060, then you’ve       to port the example package. This is fairly straightforward and the procedure is described below: Import the ‘hello world’ project from the SDK of the board to which you want to port the package. (SDKs for every board are freely available for download from the MCUXpresso SDK Builder website).We will modify this ‘hello world’ project adding code from attached packages, to make it work on the desired board.                                     Copy the following folders from the attached ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ or ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package to the ‘hello world’ project imported in step 1:                               Copy the two files to the ‘drivers’ folder of ‘hello world’ project: Delete the ‘hello_world.c’ file from the source folder: Now copy the following preprocessor micros from ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ or ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package to ‘hello world’ project:      Preprocessor settings can be found by right clicking Project-Properties>C++Build > Settings  Now we need to change the project configuration:        a.  Add the newly copied folders to source location; Right click on Project->Properties and add the following        folders:    b.  Include paths to the added libraries in the project. These can be copied from the from ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ or ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package. Open project->properties and copy the following in the respective places as shown in the images:  Change pin configurations according to the board pins you are using:             a. For changing field detect pin, the code can be found in the source file:                   b. For I2C instance, the lines of code are in app_ntag->app_ntag.h:              c. These pins also need to be initialized which can be done through the pin initialization tool of MCUXpresso or code can be added to the ‘board.c’ file in ‘board’ folder. Once these changes are done, porting is complete. Build the project, it should build without any errors. Available resources BLE pairing with NFC on KW41 and  NTAG I²C plus  source code  www.nxp.com/downloads/en/snippets-boot-code-headers-monitors/SW4223.zip NTAG I²C plus  kit for Arduino pinout  www.nxp.com/demoboard/OM23221ARD    
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This document provides a step by step guide of how to use the CLRC663 plus with i.MX RT1050. For this purpose, we need to port the NFC Reader Library to i.MX RT1050.  There are two zip files attached to this document: 1. "NFCReaderLibrary_IMXRT1050_Porting Guide +DAL_IMXRT1050_BLE-NFC-V2.zip" : This folder is pre-configured for those who want to use BLE-NFC-v2 board with i.MX RT1050. 2.  "NFCReaderLibrary_IMXRT1050_Porting Guide +DAL_IMXRT1050_CLEV6630B.zip" : This folder is pre-configured for those who want to use CLEV6630B board with i.MX RT1050. A video describing how to use i.MX RT1050 with CLRC663 Plus Family is available by clicking this link (Using i.MX RT 1050 with CLRC663 plus family |NXP ) as well. 
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Hello NFC community, MIFARE® Ultralight-based tickets offer an ideal solution for low-cost, high-volume applications such as public transport, loyalty cards and event ticketing. They serve as a perfect contactless replacement for magnetic stripe, barcode, or QR-code systems. The introduction of the contactless MIFARE Ultralight® ICs for limited-use applications can lead to reduced system installation and maintenance costs. As you may know the MIFARE family has the Ultralight C tag which is a contactless IC supporting 3DES cryptography is mostly used in limited use applications such smart ticketing, this tag complies with ISO 14443-3 type A and it is defined as type 2 tag, in this document I want to show you the procedure to change the default key to a custom key also to protect certain areas in the tag so the authentication is needed to perform a read or write operation. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For this document I used : MFEV710: PEGODA Contactless Smart Card Reader RFIDDiscover Software Lite version  Full Version Available in Docstore Mifare Ultralight c --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Information Old Key : 49454D4B41455242214E4143554F5946 New Key : 88776655443322117766554433221199 Data sheet ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- First we start with the procedure to activate the tag and the anticollision procedure explained in the ISO/IEC 14443-3. Command Direction    ">" this direction is command send from PCD (Reader) to PICC(Ultralight c)    "<" this direction is command send from PICC (Ultralight c) to PCD (Reader)    "=" Prepare this command before sending Command   Data message REQA  =  Request Command, Type A >  26 ATQA  = Answer To Request, Type A  <  4400 SEL + NVB  = SEL (Select code for cascade level ) 93, NVB (Number of Valid bits) 20 >  9320 ANTICOLLISION START <  88 045983 56   >  93708804598356 SAK  (Select Acknowledge) = indicates additional cascade level <  x04   >  9520   <  E1ED2580 A9   >  9570E1ED2580A9   <  x00 UID = 0 45983 E1ED2580  ** the following procedure is explained in section 7.5.5 from the datasheet** Command   Data message Authenticate Part 1  (command 1A) >  1A00   <  AFA1ED1D682E5101422CC7 Authenticate Part 2 (command AF) >  AF2970D895F186D0302970D895F186D030188AAF4DAF68C5B9   <  006BD027CEC3E04EBC6919 [AUTHENTICATED] Then according to  section 7.5.7 of the datasheet the sections  where the 3DES key are saved are the 2C (Page 44) to the 2F (Page 47). We proceed to  write our new key using the A2 (WRITE command) Command   Data message DATA = byte 07,06,05,04 = 11223344 WRITE to page 44 (2C) >  A22C11223344 Positive acknowledge (ACK) <  0A DATA = byte 03,02,01,00 = 55667788 WRITE to page 45 (2D) >  A22D55667788  Positive acknowledge (ACK) <  0A DATA = byte 0F,0E,0D,0C = 99112233 WRITE to page 46 (2E) >  A22E99112233  Positive acknowledge (ACK) <  0A DATA = byte 0B,0A,09,08 = 44556677 WRITE to page 47 (2F) >  A22F44556677  Positive acknowledge (ACK) <  0A [RESET FIELD] [Authenticate with new key] Command   Data message Authenticate Part 1  (command 1A >  1A00   <  AFFAE2EFF17FAAD69862E7 Authenticate Part 2 (command AF) >  AFFD5794F2D4EA1B19FD5794F2D4EA1B196CF420CD4D9E8104   <  0030922228601939B8FA18 [AUTENTICATED WITH NEW KEY] we proceed to define from which sector the authentication is needed in order to read or write, to do this we use a write command to the AUTH0 (AUTH0 defines the page address from which the authentication is required. Valid  address values for byte AUTH0 are from 03h to 30h.) the AUTH0 is located on the section 2A please check table 5 from #datasheet. **for this example we will define that from page 6 (06) we will need authentication to perform a read or write operation** Command   Data message WRITE command (A2) to AUTH0 (2A) from page 6 (06) >  A22A06000000 Positive acknowledge (ACK) <  0A Now the Read capabilities from page 06  require an Authentication in order to be read or written. Hope you find this document useful to get a better understanding of the behavior of the Ultralight C and how its security features can help you in your applications. Have a great day! BR Jonathan
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Environments & Devices --Hardware 1 、 PN7462 DEMO Board(PNEV7642B) --Software 1 、 Ubuntu 16.04 desktop 2 、 Test tools ---libusb ---pcsc-lite ---ccid driver ---opensc          Before testing, please install above test tools to Ubuntu 16.04 according to document on the link https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-334952 !          Then follow steps below to begin testing PN7462 DEMO board by above test tools. 1 、 Update firmware of PN7462 DEMO board          Please update firmware of PN7462 DEMO board according to UM10915.pdf, then test it on windows, ensuring PN7462 DEMO board can normally work at CCID protocol on window platform. 2 、 Connecting PN7462 DEMO Board to PC USB via USB OTG Cable.          On PENV7462B side, X3 connector should be used for USB OTG cable. 3 、 Using lsusb to list USB devices weidong@ubuntu:~$ lsusb Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0e0f:0003 VMware, Inc. Virtual Mouse Bus 002 Device 003: ID 0e0f:0002 VMware, Inc. Virtual USB Hub Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 002 Device 004: ID 0e0f:0008 VMware, Inc. Bus 002 Device 005: ID 1fc9:0117 NXP Semiconductors          Last line is PN7472 DEMO board. 4 、 Open 2 terminals at the same time on Ubuntu desktop (1) One terminal is used to run “pcsc” command weidong@ubuntu:~$ sudo /usr/local/sbin/pcscd -adf [sudo] password for weidong: 00000000 pcscdaemon.c:345:main() pcscd set to foreground with debug send to stdout 00012288 configfile.l:361:DBGetReaderList() Parsing conf file: /usr/local/etc/reader.conf.d 00000037 pcscdaemon.c:658:main() pcsc-lite 1.8.22 daemon ready. 00023126 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x1D6B, PID: 0x0001, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/001 00000101 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x1D6B, PID: 0x0001, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/001 00000113 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x0E0F, PID: 0x0003, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/002 00000112 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x1D6B, PID: 0x0001, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/001 00000160 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x0E0F, PID: 0x0002, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/003 00000152 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x0E0F, PID: 0x0008, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/004 00000115 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x0E0F, PID: 0x0008, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/004 00000165 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x0E0F, PID: 0x0002, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/003 00000263 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x1D6B, PID: 0x0002, path: /dev/bus/usb/001/001 ^V56546837 hotplug_libudev.c:651:HPEstablishUSBNotifications() USB Device add 00000101 hotplug_libudev.c:297:get_driver() Looking for a driver for VID: 0x1FC9, PID: 0x0117, path: /dev/bus/usb/002/006 00000007 hotplug_libudev.c:436:HPAddDevice() Adding USB device: PN7462 USB Reader 00000045 readerfactory.c:1074:RFInitializeReader() Attempting startup of PN7462 USB Reader (1.00) 00 00 using /usr/local/lib/pcsc/drivers/ifd-ccid.bundle/Contents/Linux/libccid.so 00127887 readerfactory.c:949:RFBindFunctions() Loading IFD Handler 3.0 00000236 ifdhandler.c:1965:init_driver() Driver version: 1.4.27 00000477 ifdhandler.c:1982:init_driver() LogLevel: 0x0003 00000004 ifdhandler.c:1993:init_driver() DriverOptions: 0x0000 00000165 ifdhandler.c:111:CreateChannelByNameOrChannel() Lun: 0, device: usb:1fc9/0117:libudev:0:/dev/bus/usb/002/006 00000021 ccid_usb.c:302:OpenUSBByName() Using: /usr/local/lib/pcsc/drivers/ifd-ccid.bundle/Contents/Info.plist 00000727 ccid_usb.c:320:OpenUSBByName() ifdManufacturerString: Ludovic Rousseau ( ludovic.rousseau@free.fr ) 00000016 ccid_usb.c:321:OpenUSBByName() ifdProductString: Generic CCID driver 00000004 ccid_usb.c:322:OpenUSBByName() Copyright: This driver is protected by terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License version 2.1, or (at your option) any later version. 00000433 ccid_usb.c:656:OpenUSBByName() Found Vendor/Product: 1FC9/0117 (PN7462 USB Reader) 00000005 ccid_usb.c:658:OpenUSBByName() Using USB bus/device: 2/6 00000021 ccid_usb.c:717:OpenUSBByName() bNumDataRatesSupported is 0 00128471 ifdhandler.c:382:IFDHGetCapabilities() tag: 0xFB3, usb:1fc9/0117:libudev:0:/dev/bus/usb/002/006 (lun: 0) 00000027 readerfactory.c:396:RFAddReader() Using the reader polling thread 00004709 ifdhandler.c:382:IFDHGetCapabilities() tag: 0xFAE, usb:1fc9/0117:libudev:0:/dev/bus/usb/002/006 (lun: 0) 00000023 ifdhandler.c:477:IFDHGetCapabilities() Reader supports 1 slot(s) (2)The other terminal is used to run “ "testpcsc " in pcsc-lite/src source code weidong@ubuntu:~/ccid/pcsc-lite-1.8.22/src$ ./testpcsc   MUSCLE PC/SC Lite unitary test Program   THIS PROGRAM IS NOT DESIGNED AS A TESTING TOOL FOR END USERS! Do NOT use it unless you really know what you do.   Testing SCardEstablishContext        : Command successful. Testing SCardIsValidContext   : Command successful. Testing SCardIsValidContext   : Invalid handle. (don't panic) Testing SCardListReaderGroups      : Command successful. Group 01: SCard$DefaultReaders Testing SCardFreeMemory               : Command successful. Testing SCardListReaders        : Command successful. Testing SCardListReaders        : Command successful. Reader 01: PN7462 USB Reader (1.00) 00 00 Waiting for card insertion        :          2 screenshots for above 2 terminals: 5 、 Test cards (All cards are contactless) (1) MIFARE Plus x 4K card Re move it: (2) MIFARE Nano card          Note: testpcsc should be run again. Remove it: (3) MIFARE EV1 card Remove it: 6 、 Using Opensc-tool to Test cards            Open a new terminal for running the command, please! (1)No cards (2) MIFARE Plus x 4K card (close to antenna , then run opensc-tool) (3) MIFARE Nano card (4) MIFARE EV1 card    TIC Weidong Sun 2018-07-09
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As NFC reader library 5.12 also supports PN5180, switching the NFC frontend from CLRC663 to PN5180 is quite easy based on previous porting. The porting also includes the hardware settings and software modification. Hardware Setup for porting: a) Remove resistors on PNEV5180B to disconnect the onboard lpc1769 from PN5180, following steps on page 16 of https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN11908.pdf  b) Connect LPCXpresso board for LPC11U37 with PNEV5180 as below: Software Modification for porting: 1. Make a copy of Board_Lpc11u37Rc663.h , and change its name to "Board_Lpc11u37Pn5180.h", and import it into the DAL/boards folder. 2.Change the source code in the header file as below: 3. Add two more pins' definition and configuration for BUSY and DWL pins of PN5180, and new configuration for reset pin. and modify the reset logic: 4.Change the IRQ interrupt trigger type to rising edge. 5.Include this header file in BoardSelection.h 6.Add this new configuration in ph_NxpBuild_App.h 7.Add this new configuration in phApp_Init.h 8.Add this new configuration in ph_NxpBuild_Platform.h 9.Add this new configuration in Settings. 10.Building result: Testing result:
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Hello NFC Community! This document demonstrates that multiple records can be also read from a Tag with TagXplorer. Please follow the steps below. Let's begin... Please make sure that you have written more than on record with NXP TagWriter app. For a more detailed explanation on this, please refer to the following document: Writing multiple NDEF text records with TagWrite app  The app can be found and downloaded from the Play Store: NFC TagWriter by NXP - Apps on Google Play  -> Connect the reader in TagXplorer -> Place the card on the reader and press Connect Tag -> Check for NDEF (1) and then, read NDEF (2). The Text Records can be visualized in the NDEF Payload Info below: I hope this is of great help! Ivan R.
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Hello NFC Community, This document describes how to write multiple NDEF Text Record by making use of NFC TagWriter app by NXP. First of all, download the TagWriter app from the Play Store: NFC TagWriter by NXP - Apps on Google Play  1) Once downloaded, go to the Write tags section. 2) In this case, a NDEF text record will be written. 3) Write a text message in the TextBox and press the Save & Write Button. 4) Now, press the ADD MORE RECORD Button so that another record can be added to the content to be written in the tag. 5) Select Plain Text again.   6) Same, procedure as in 3. 7) Finally, Tap the card and press the DONE Button. I hope this is of great help! Ivan R.
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Based on NFC reader library porting guide for LPC11u37h(Ver 5.12) ,We have a partial ported NFC reader library like below: Now, it is time to port other demos in this project. You may choose any demo, but here NfcrdlibEx2_AdvancedDiscoveryLoop is selected. and similar with before, the first step is creating a new build configuration: then in the project references, choose the LPCopen library for LPC11u37 instead. Change the MCU settings: Change the build settings: Change FreeRTOS portable to cortex M0: Search "PHDRIVER_LPC1769RC663_BOARD" in the source code of "NfcrdlibEx2_AdvancedDiscoveryLoop" project, and you may simply replace it with "PHDRIVER_LPC11U37RC663_BOARD", and there are only two places needs to be fixed. Search "PHDRIVER_LPC1769" in the source code of "NfcrdlibEx2_AdvancedDiscoveryLoop" project, and you may simply replace it with "PHDRIVER_LPC11U37". Most changes are in phApp_Init.c. Also please don't forget to enable optimization for size. Building result: Demo testing result:
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The latest NFC reader library supports lpc1769 which is a cortex M3 controller with LPCopen lib supports, so in theory , it should supports other controllers supported by LPCopen, but we have to test this, so we choose , for example, lpc11u37, a cortex M0 based controller for this porting. Platform for this porting: LPC11u37h-Xpresso Rev A: CLRC663 plus based CLEV663B Blueboard 3.0. Please refer to Prepare CLEV663B board for NFC reader library porting  for details. They are connected via LPCXpresso ports. Now we may start the porting, the IDE we use in this porting is MCUXpresso 10.1.1 1. Download and import the latest NFC reader library for CLEV6630B, as it supports CLRC663 plus. For how to import the project, please refer to https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN11211.pdf . 2. Download LPCopen for LPC11u37h and import it as well. 3. Now we may choose some demo in the NFC reader library, for example, the NfcrdlibEx1_BasicDiscoveryLoop, and create new build configuration for lpc11u37h. 4.Select the correct MCU 5.Modify build settings Here we find LPC1769RC663 is defined, so we have to find what is related with this definition in the code and change it/them. Fortunately they are not too many. you may find they are just related with board header file including or something like that, so it is not difficult to modify them. 6. Add new header file for the new board definition 7. add the new board definition 8. As we now use LPCopen lib for LPC11u37h instead, so we have to change the including path. As LPC11u37h is cortex M3 based, so we have to setup FreeRTOS for M0 support: and add the source code for building: 9.Change the link libraries and including path 10.Set the correct ref projects to use LPCopen for LPC11u37h. 11. Some changes in LPCopen library: 1)enable semihosting debug 2) add startup source code for the demo, this C file can be reused/imported from the some lpcopen project. 12. After the above steps, we still have to change the source code in DAL: You know , due to different version of LPCopen library,  some function definition might be changed, and different LPCXpresso boards has different pin connection to the LPCXpresso ports, so it is recommended checking the board schematics and the examples in lpcopen project , find the proper function calls to implement the source codes in the DAL folder. When you finished , the porting is done. 13. As the final image size is greater than 128K, we have enable optimization for size. 14.Demo test ok. Now , we know lpc11u37 can be supported by the latest NFC reader library, so the porting should also be applied for other Cortex M0 controllers, and it is recommended the controller with large internal flash size, better greater than 128K, but anyway, in this porting, I didn't enable the size optimization for LPCopen library, so there might be possibility to have a smaller size image at last...
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The latest NFC reader library for CLRC663 just supports LPCXpresso1769 and FRDM-K82 boards, so when customers want to porting the library to other host controller, they have to make a custom board at first, or use OM26630FDK and make a little hardware modification by following the steps described in https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/training-reference-material/NFC-READER-K64F.pdf?fsrch=1&sr=3&pageNum=1 to connect the frontend board with host controller board, but today we will discuss an alternative way. The CLEV663B Blueboard is a pure NFC frontend board, and it supports connecting with LPCXpresso board not limited with LPC1769, the main difference with OM26630FDK is the reader IC, which is CLRC663 not CLRC663 plus, but fortunately they are pin to pin compatible, so we may replace it with CLRC663 plus, and use that board for porting purpose. Before: After: please forgive my poor soldering skill... With this new board and LPC1769 Xpresso board, you may run the latest 5.12 NFC reader library, for example, the NfcrdlibEx1_BasicDiscoveryLoop demo. but you might have the following issue: This is due to ver 5.12 use another set of IO pins to connect with the reader IC, modify pin definitions in Board_Lpc1769Rc663.h can fix this issue. The final result is as below: Please note, it is recommended using NFC reader library ver 4.03 to test the hardware including CLEV663B and LPC1769Xpresso before replacing with CLRC663 plus, and you know, CLEV663B Blueboard is just optimized for CLRC663 , so the matching circuit is not the best for CLRC663 plus, it is just good enough to run the demo, so that we may know if the porting is successful, but if you want to have the best performance with CLRC663 plus, you have to redo the antenna tuning, and you may refer to https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-335545 for more details on that topic.
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