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Contents 1. Principle of energy measurement 2. Energy measurement test   2.1 Use in non-Debug state   2.2 Use in Debug state   During the operation of MCU, real-time measurement of board current and voltage is of great significance to the stability of system power consumption. Especially in scenarios that are sensitive to voltage and current fluctuations, it is particularly important to collect and analyze high-frequency samples. MCUXpresso IDE integrates the power measurement function, which can measure the current and voltage of the development board in real time and calculate the real-time power consumption. Based on MCUXpresso IDE v11.5.0, this article mainly explains power measurement function usage. 1.   Principle of energy measurement Currently the MCUXpresso IDE energy measurement function supports the following development boards: -LPCXpresso546x8/540xx/54S0xx -LPCXpresso54102 -LPCXpresso51U68/54114 -QN9090-DK006/ JN5189-DK006/IOTZKB-DK006 -QN9080DK The power measurement actually uses the LPC-Link2/MCU-Link debugger on the development board to collect the conversion value of the A/D conversion chip, and perform software calculation to obtain the power measurement result. Taking LPCXpresso54628 development board as an example, the following is the circuit diagram of the power measurement part: Fig.1 The MAX9634TEUK+T is a precision current amplifier. And ADC122S021 is a 12-bit A/D converter with dual-channel sampling, its rate can reach 200ksps. ADC122S021 collects LPC54xx_CURR and SHLD_CURR voltages, IDE sets Target resistor (Total Rvsense in the figure) and Shield resistor (resistance value corresponding to SHLD_CURR) in advance. The LPC-Link2 debugger can calculate the voltage, current and power consumption information by collecting AD conversion values. 2.   Energy measurement test Taking LPCXpresso54628 development board as an example. Open the menu bar : Analysis->Energy Measurement. The Energy Measurement interface will appear in the lower right corner of the screen, which is divided into Plot drawing and Config configuration interface. It can be used in Debug state or in non-Debug state during measurement. Test the case of LED small light flickering and observe the changes of voltage, current and energy consumption. Note that the LPC-Link2 debugger version should be CMSIS-DAP probe version 5.147 and above. 2.1 Use in non-Debug state Click the button  in energy measurement interface and select the measured in the config interface. You can select the target voltage, target current and shielding current. The sampling rate can be selected as 50ksps, 62.5ksps or 100ksps. First select the model of the development board to be tested, and then continue to select the target resistance and shielding resistance. The target resistance value is selected according to the jumper cap description in Figure 1. The resistance value of the shielding resistance is the fixed resistance value of development board. As shown in the figure below: Fig.2 Select the target voltage to be measured, and click the button to run the Energy Measurement interface. You can see the slight fluctuation of voltage in the plot interface and view the average voltage through the delimited area of horizontal measurement, as follows: Fig.3 Select the target current to be measured. Before measuring the target current, click Read from target on the config interface to calculate the average value of the target voltage within 0.5s for subsequent power consumption calculation. Click the run button to see that the target current fluctuates slightly with the flashing of the small light in the plot interface. At the same time, check the average current, power consumption and energy consumption through the delimited area of horizontal measurement, as follows: Fig.4 2.2 Use in Debug state When used in the debug state, you can use MCUXpresso IDE or KEIL to enter the debugging state. Click the button on the energy measurement interface to read the power consumption in the debug state. The measurement process is the same as the non-Debug state, as follows: Fig.5 This is a general enablement document of how to use energy measurement feature in debug and non-debug mode. For more, please refer  MCUXpresso_IDE_Energy_Measurement. pdf under MCUXpresso IDE install folder.    
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1. General Jointly developed by NXP and Embedded Artists, the MCU-Link Pro is a fully featured debug probe that can be used with MCUXpresso IDE and 3rd party IDEs that support CMSIS-DAP and/or J-Link protocols. MCU-Link Pro is based on NXP’s MCU-Link architecture, found in the  MCU-Link  low cost debug probe and on board evaluation boards, and runs the same firmware as all these implementations. In addition to SWD debug, SWO profiling and a USB to UART bridge features (VCOM) found in the base MCU-Link, the Pro model adds a J-Link LITE firmware option, energy measurement, analog signal monitor, USB to SPI and I2C bridging capability and an on-board LPC804 for peripheral emulation. MCU-Link Pro is based on the dual Arm® Cortex-M33® core LPC55S69 microcontroller, and features a high speed USB interface, providing high performance debug at low cost. The USB bridging feature is supported by the free  LIBUSBSIO host library  from NXP. MCU-Link Pro is compatible with Windows 10, MacOS and Linux. The product comes with the necessary firmware installed, with free utilities provided to enable future firmware updates from NXP to be installed. MCU-Link Pro kit provides all parts that need to be used. Kit Contains MCU-Link Pro debug probe 10 pin to 10 pin Cortex debug cable 10 pin to 20 pin Cortex debug cable Digital port / analog input adapter cable Spare jumpers 2. MCU-Link Pro Overview MCU-Link Pro has complete functions. This article mainly introduces the usage and precautions of several basic functions, including SWD debugging, UART (VCOM) and energy measurement. The following figure is the reference diagram of MCU Link Pro, covering all functions, and the highlighted part is the function used in this article.   2.1 SWD debug As a debugger, the most basic function of MCU Link Pro is debugging, and now commonly used is SWD debug. When you get the development board, you can see that there are three SWD interfaces on it. Only J7 is the SWD interface to debug target board. It is on the opposite side of the USB interface to facilitate the connection and debugging of the target board. The other two interfaces J3 and J11 are SWD interfaces of LPC55s69 and LPC804 respectively. Another important function of this debugger is that it can supply power to the target board. The use method is to connect J6 with jumper, and 1.8V and 3.3V power supply can be selected through J5. The specific connection is shown in the figure below: - Connect the SWD interface of J7 and target board with debug line. - J6 connecting jumper cap (supplying power to target board).  The USB cable connects J1 and the computer, so you can debug with MCUXpresso IDE or other IDEs. CMSIS-DAP and J-Link debugging protocols are supported. For how to update the debugger firmware, please refer to:https://www.nxp.com/document/guide/getting-started-with-the-mcu-link-pro:GS-MCU-LINK-PRO   2.2 UART (VCOM) Usage In the development and debug stage, users often need to print information through the serial port. Using MCU Link Pro, without additional hardware, directly connect the TX and Rx of target UART with the Rx / TX of UART of MCU Link Pro. Through the VCOM function, you can print information from the USB port to the serial port assistant at the PC end. The specific connection is shown in the figure below: - J19-8 (purple line) connects UART TX of target board - J19-9 (gray line) connects the UART RX of the target board - J19-1 (GND) connect GND of target board - J14 disconnected - J6 plug in the jumper cap (supply power to the target board)   2.3 Energy measurement The MCU Link Pro board contains a circuit that can measure the current or voltage of the target board, and it can be calibrated automatically every time it is powered on without manual intervention. There are two maximum measurement ranges for energy measurement. If the data is higher than the maximum range, the measurement result is inaccurate. The two maximum measurement ranges are as follows, which need to be configured with J16, J17 and J18.   Energy measurement needs to be used with MCUXpresso IDE, and the results are displayed in the IDE interface. Use J9 port on the board. The specific connection is shown in the figure below: - J9-1 connects the power supply end of the target board. - J9-3 connects the chip ends of the target board. - J9-2 connects the GND of the target board For details on how to use the MCU Xpress IDE interface, please refer to:<MCUXpresso_IDE_Energy_Measurement.pdf> 3. Test result The test results are as follows:          
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Recently, customers reported that the number of PWM generated by SCTimer module was inconsistent between LPC55s06 user manual and data sheet. There are many kinds of PWM generation formats, so the maximum number of PWM generated by SCTimer is also different. I think the user manual and data sheet are not very clear, so this paper makes a specific analysis. It mainly depends on SCTimer resources, such as the number of events and output channels. For all LPC series, the mechanism of SCTimer generating PWM is the same. Therefore, this paper takes LPC55s6 as an example. LPC55s06 user manual: The SCTimer/PWM supports: – Eight inputs. – Ten outputs. – Sixteen match/capture registers. – Sixteen events. – Thirty two states. According to the different control modes of generating PWM wave, this paper is divided into single-edge PWM control, dual-edge PWM control and center-aligned PWM control. 1. Single-edge PWM control The figure below shows two single-edge control PWM waves with different duty cycles and the same PWM cycle length.   It can be seen from the above figure that the two PWM waves require three events: when the counter reaches 41, 65 and 100 respectively. Because of the same PWM cycle length, all PWM outputs need only one period event. Summary: The cycle length of all PWM waves are the same, so only one period event is required. The duty cycles of each PWM are different, and each PWM requires an event. The SCTimer of LPC55s06 has 16 events, one is used as PWM period event, and there are 15 left. Theoretically, 15 channels of PWM can be generated. However, LPC55s06 has only 10 outputs, so it can generate up to 10 single-edge control PWM waves. 2. Dual-edge PWM control The figure below shows three Dual-edge control PWM waves with different duty cycles and the same PWM cycle length.   It can be seen from the above figure that the three PWM waves require seven events: when the counter reaches 1, 27, 41, 53, 65, 78, 100.   Summary: PWM cycle length control needs one event, and each PWM duty cycle needs two events to trigger. The SCTimer of LPC55s06 has 16 events, one as PWM frequency event, and the remaining 15, so it can generate up to 7 dual-edge control PWM waves. 3. Center-aligned PWM control Center-aligned PWM control is a special case of dual-edge PWM control. The figure below shows two center-aligned PWM waves with different duty cycles and the same PWM duty length.   It can be seen from the above figure that the two center-aligned PWM waves need three events in total, which are the PWM cycle length and the duty cycle trigger of the two PWM waves. Because the left and right are symmetrical, only one event is needed to control the duty cycle of one PWM. Summary: All PWM have the same cycle length, so an event is required. The duty cycle of each PWM circuit is different, but the left and right are symmetrical, and an event trigger is required for each circuit. The SCTimer of LPC55s06 has 16 events, one is used as PWM cycle length, and there are 15 left. Theoretically, 15 channels of PWM can be generated, but LPC55s06 has only 10 outputs, so it can generate up to 10 channels of unilateral control PWM wave. Summary:   Maximum number of PWM generated by LPC55s6 SCTimer: Single-edge PWM control : 10 Dual-edge PWM control : 7 Center-aligned control: 10   The number of SCTimer events and output channels is different with different chips, but the analysis method is the same. Customers can analyze whether the SCTimer in a certain chip meets the requirements.
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Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. USB Demo based on MCUXpresso SDK 1     2.1 Update USB device demo: USB0->USB1 2     2.2 Update USB host demo: USB0->USB1 2     2.3 Update USB ROM demo: USB0-> USB1 3 3. USB Demo based on LPCOpen 3 4. Notes and Recap 4  1.     Introduction Most of LPC devices integrate USB module. NXP LPC currently integrates full-speed USB (FS, Full Speed, 12Mbps) and high-speed (HS, High Speed, 480Mbps) USB. Specifically, for the LPC series: - Some LPCs such as LPC55xx and LPC54xxx integrate both HS USB and FS USB. Usually USB0 is FS USB and USB1 is HS USB. - Some LPCs such as LPC43xx and LPC18xx integrate two HS USBs, so USB0 and USB1 are both HS USBs. The two most well-known NXP software packages for LPC series are MCUXpresso SDK and LPCOpen. MCUXpresso SDK is mainly for LPC products launched in recent years, while LPCOpen is used for earlier LPC derivatives. The USB demos included in these two packages run on USB0 by default. Most of NXP USB demos are for USB0 by default. This article is to introduce how to switch a USB0 demo to USB1 demo based on different software packages. 2.     USB Demo based on MCUXpresso SDK (e.g. LPC54XXX, LPC55XX) The MCUXpresso SDK USB demo codes are categorized as: - USB as Device: e.g. usb_device_cdc_vcom, usb_device_hid_generic, etc. - USB as Host: e.g. usb_host_hid_mouse, usb_host_msd_fatfs, etc. - USB demo based on USB ROM API: e.g. usb_rom_device_audio,usb_rom_device_cdc, etc. 2.1  Update USB device demo: USB0->USB1 Taking usb_device_cdc_vcom demo as an example. To switch to USB1, simply change the corresponding code in usb_device_config.h file as follows. /*! @brief LPC USB IP3511 FS instance count*/ #define USB_DEVICE_CONFIG_LPCIP3511FS (0U) /*! @brief LPC USB IP3511 HS instance count*/ #define USB_DEVICE_CONFIG_LPCIP3511HS (1U) After the change, recompile the program to run. The program was updated to USB1 device demo. 2.2   Update USB host demo: USB0->USB1 Taking usb_host_hid_mouse demo code as an example, to switch to USB1, modify the macro definition in usb_host_config.h as follows: #defineUSB_HOST_CONFIG_KHCI (0U) #defineUSB_HOST_CONFIG_EHCI (0U) #define USB_HOST_CONFIG_OHCI (0U) #define USB_HOST_CONFIG_IP3516HS (1U)   The program is recompiled and run. The program was updated to USB1 host demo. 2.3  Update USB ROM demo: USB0-> USB1 ( e.g. LPC54XXX Series) USB ROM demo calls the USB ROM API, there is no way to switch the default USB0 to USB1 by modifying macro definitions. In order to update code to USB1 demo, the recommended steps are as below: -USB HS DEVICE and USB PHY clock configuration -Change to use USB HS ISR -Locate the related buffer into USB RAM. -Set the USB ROM handle to be HS If user has difficulties in revising the code by self, user can apply demo code from NXP LPC online support team by creating a private case. 3.     USB Demo based on LPCOpen (e.g. LPC43XX, LPC18XX) Some legacy LPCs run on LPCOpen, such as LPC43xx series, LPC18xx series. Their USB0 and USB1 are both high-speed. The default USB demo is for USB0 as well. To switch to USB1, we can uncomment #define USE_USB1 and comment #define USE_USB0 in app_usbd_cfg.h. // #define USE_USB0  #define USE_USB1 Taking usbd_rom_cdc_uart demo as an example:   Recompile and run, the program is updated to USB1 demo. 4.     Notes and Recap The focus of this article is on software modification of converting USB0 to USB1 on NXP SW package. Regarding the hardware, customer needs to check the specific demo board user guide. For example, when we use HS USB, it may be necessary to provide an external power supply, and the jumper also needs to be adjusted to build a well hardware environment for HS USB operation. I will not dwell on them here. This article summarizes methods of switching USB0 to USB1 for several commonly used LPC series on MCUXpresso SDK and LPCOpen package. customers who need USB1 demo code can find the corresponding modification methods in this article for their own software and chips. Official routines are only used for demo board demos and chip learning. If for commercial usage, user needs to learn USB in depth and be responsible for own application.  
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  [LPC546xx] Understanding ECRP   Code protection is usually considered at the last step during developing stage. The purpose is to protect our code being hacked when the product is released to market. For example, using ECRP to disable SWD debug interface, disable ISP, disable mass erase, etc. 1.    ECRP vs Legacy CRP   ECRP (Enhanced Code Read Protection) is versus legacy CRP on early LPC devices. We can consider ECRP as an advanced version of CRP. Comparing with CRP, ECRP adds new protection features: − Block ISP via Pins − Block ISP using IAP − Block SWD − Mass Erase enable/disable − Sector protection This table lists the difference of ECRP vs. CRP from Anti-Tampering and Flexible view. 2.    Understand and implement ECRP ECRP allows user to tenable below features: − Protect FLASH from ISP Erase/Write − Protect FLASH from IAP Erase/Write − Enable/Disable ISP Entry from bootloader − Enable/Disable ISP Entry from IAP call − Enable/Disable SWD Enable/Disable It looks easy but it is important to know that ECRP feature is controlled by both FLASH and OTP configuration! The most restrictive combination in both setting is needed 2.1          Where is FLASH ECRP: ECRP is at 0x20 of vector table, it’s uint32_t type. We write to this address to set FLASH ECRP protection. The valid bits of FLASH_ECRP is 0-17bit, and the default value is 0xFFFF_FFFF. For detail, please see UM.   2.2          Where is OTP ECRP OPT is a non-volatile and write-once register. OTP is not FLASH and it can be ONLY written by IAP function. OPT ECRP configuration is at OPT bank 3. The default OTP ECRP value is 0.   2.3          FLASH ECRP + OTP ECRP Decides the Protection. See this table to show the combination. Here OTP ECRP is always set with higher priority than FLASH ECRP! Here is typical ECRP settings 2.4        Be Attention! The part is permanently disabled when On-chip Image(s) are ruined SWD access prohibited ISP entries prohibited Please be attention when testing ECRP feature, mis-operation may make the chip brick!
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Recently I found some customers have a bit of problem when porting project from one MCU to another, so this article using simple steps demonstrates how to change MCU with MCUXpresso. There is also a video demonstrated the detail steps in attachment. Pay attention, as MCUXpresso User Guide says: All projects are associated with a particular MCU at creation time. The target MCU determines the project memory layout, startup code, LinkServer flash driver, libraries, supporting sources,launch configuration options etc. etc. so changing a project’s associated MCU should not be undertaken unless you have a total grasp of the consequence of this change. Therefore rather than changing a project’s associated MCU, it is strongly recommended that instead a new project is generated for the desired MCU and this new project is edited as required. However, on occasion it may be expedient to reset a project’s MCU (and associated SDK) and this can be achieved as follows. For example, changing lpc55s69 to lpc55s06, we need install SDKs for lpc55s69 and lpc55s06 before all the below steps. 1 - Change MCU & Package 1.1 – Change MCU Right click “MCU” under Project tree, choose “Edit MCU” Uncheck ”Preserve memory configuration”(it is checked by default)->choose LPC55S06->there is a warning, choose Yes. We can see the Memory details changed to lpc55s06, then click ”Apply and close”. 1.2 – Change Package 2 - Change Compiler Definitions In Properties view->Settings->MCU Compiler ->Preprocessor, change the definition for CPU from LPC55S69JBD100 to LPC55S06JBD64 as below: 3 – Change/add SDK driver for LPC55s06 Selected project, then click ”Manage SDK components”, choose the drivers our application used, for example, clock, power, usart. Click “OK”, then click “Yes” to update. Delete LPC55S69 device related files: Add “system_LPC55S06.c” and “system_LPC55S06.h” files: 4 - Change startup file. Delete LPC55s69 startup files, add “startup_lpc55s06.c”, we can find the startup file in any SDK demo. 5 - Change board related files. Refer to our own new board, change files under “board” folder, for example pins, uart number, here directly copy from SDK demo for LPCxpresso55s06 board. 6 - Test the project  function with new board Build project until no compile error, download and run it, result as below.        
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After LPC54XXX enter ISP mode, there are two methods to upgrade the application through UART/I2C/SPI/USB. One method is to change the ISP pin state when power on, and the other method is to reinvoke ISP Boot ROM in source code during code running. The first method does not require user to write any code, and the operation is simple, but the disadvantage is that it is not flexible and is not suitable for on-site operation; The second method is more flexible and is widely used in Secondary Bootloader applications developed by yourself, but it requires users to write their own code. In actual development, because the USB port of personal computer is easy to use, the method of using the USB port for application upgrade is becoming more and more popular. Unfortunately, we currently do not have instructions for upgrading the application by the USB port in ISP mode. So we write this article to share the method here.   There are two methods to enter ISP mode: Method 1: Enter ISP mode to upgrade the application during power on On the hardware side, configure the ISP0~2 pins before power-on or reset, and the MCU enters ISP mode to upgrade the application. The pin configuration method is as follows: Figure 1.   Method 2: Activate Reinvoke ISP in source code to upgrade the application In ISP mode, the application is upgraded through UART/I2C/SPI/USB. This article focuses on the USB method. Here for USB, Both USB0 (Full Speed) and USB1 (High Speed) of LPC54XXX can be used for application upgrade. There are two USB upgrade modes: DFU (Device Firmware Updata) and MSC (Mass Storage Device Class), as follows: Figure 2.   Select the application upgrade mode by modifying byte 0 and byte 1 of the ISP parameter array. The key code is as follows Figure 3.   There are 3 key point we need to pay attention in Figure 3: -When isp_mode[0] is configured as 0xAA, it is DFU mode, otherwise it is MSC mode (for example, isp_mode[0] is configured as 0xFF). -When isp_mode[1] is configured as 8, USB FS is used, and when it is configured as 9, USB HS is used. -Enter the ISP mode through the Chip_IAP_ReinvokeISP function. 2.1 Use DFU for application upgrade Tool preperation: To work with DFU, dfu-util tool is needed to use DFU to upgrade the application, you can download the DFU tool on the DFU official website. The link is as follows: http://dfu-util.sourceforge.net/ NXP also includes the dfu-util tool in LPCScrypt. If you have downloaded LPCScrypt, you can use it directly in the bin directory.   DFU update application Steps: Take LPC54628 as an example, ISP is configured as DUF mode, and USB1 is used to upgrade the application. Modify the relevant code in Figure 3, as follows: isp_mode[0] = 0xAA; isp_mode[1] = SL_USBHS; Build and download the application to the MCU, power on again, and connect USB1 to the computer. Here Enter the dfu-util tool directory and copy the .bin file to the current directory. Use the command: ./dfu-util -l   Find the DFU devices. Use the command: ./dfu-util -D .\lpcxpresso54628_gpio_led_output.bin -a 0 Download the lpcxpresso54628_gpio_led_output.bin file to the device with alt number 0. Alt0 is "FLASH", alt1 is "RAM", and the specific operations are as follows:   Figure 4.   After downloading the application successfully, reset the MCU and observe the blinking phenomenon of the LED on the development board.   2.2 Use MSC for application upgrade Take LPC54628 as an example, ISP is configured as MSC mode, and USB1 is used to upgrade the application. Modify the relevant code in Figure 3, as follows: isp_mode[0] = 0xFF; isp_mode[1] = SL_USBHS; Build and download the application to the MCU, power on again, and connect USB1 to the computer. You will found another disk in my computer, as follows: Figure 5.   Then do the following to update firmware: -Remove the original firmware.bin in the CRP DISABLD disk. -Rename the application (for example, lpcxpresso54628_gpio_led_output.bin) to firmware.bin. -Copy the application firmware.bin to the CRP DISABLD disk. -Reset the MCU, if the LED is observed blinking, it proves that the application has been successfully upgraded. Note: The application must be renamed, and the rename cannot be performed in the CRP DISABLD disk.   Demo project: lpcxpresso54628_flashiap.zip Application upgrade file:lpcxpresso54628_gpio_led_output.bin (generated by SDK demo code)
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1 Abstract       This post is mainly about the LPC54608 LIN slave basic usage, it is similar to the post about the LPC54608 LIN master basic usage.            NXP LPC54608 UART module already have the LIN master and slave function, so this post will give a simple slave code and test result which is associated with the LIN analyzer. Use the LIN analyzer as the LIN master, LPC54608 as the LIN slave, master will send the specific ID frame (publish frame and the subscribe frame) to LIN slave, and wait the feedback from LIN slave side. 2 LPC54608 LIN slave example      Now use the LPCXpresso54608 board as the LIN slave, the PCAN-USB Pro FD LIN analyzer as the LIN master, give the hardware connection and the simple software code about the LIN slave. 2.1 Hardware requirement        Hardware : LPCXpresso54608 , TRK-KEA8 , PCAN-USB Pro FD(LIN analyzer), 12V DC power supply        LIN bus voltage is 12V, but the LPCXpresso54608 board don’t have the on-board LIN transceiver chip, so we need to find the external board which contains LIN transceiver chip, here we will use the TRK-KEA8, this board already have the MC33662LEF LIN transceiver, or the board KIT33662LEFEVB which is mentioned in the LPC54608 LIN master post.  The MC33662LEF LIN transceiver circuit from TRK-KEA8 just as follows: Fig 2-1. LIN transceiver schematic 2.1.1 LPCXpresso54608 and TRK-KEA8 connections      LPCXpresso54608 UART port need to connect to the LIN transceiver: No. LPCXpresso54608 TRK-KEA8 note 1 P4_RX J10-5 UART0_RX 2 P4_TX J10-6 UART0_TX 3 P4_GND J14-1 GND 2.1.2 TRK-KEA8 and LIN master analyzer tool connections        LIN analyzer LIN bus is connected to the TRK-KEA8 LIN bus.        LIN analyzer GND is connected to the TRK-KEA8 GND.             TRK-KEA8 P1 port powered with 12V, LIN master analyzer Vbat pin also need to be connected to 12V.        TRK-KEA8 J13_2 need to connect to 3.3V DC power, but because TRK-KEA8 is the 5V and 12V, so need to find another 3.3V supply to connect J13_2, here use the FRDM-KL43 as the 3.3V supply. Just make sure the LIN transceiver can input 3.3V and output the 3.3V signal to the UART port.    2.1.3 Physical connections 2.2 Software flow and code        This part is about the LIN publisher data and the subscriber ID data between the LIN master and slave. The code is modified based on the SDK  LPCXpresso54608 usart interrupt project.  2.2.1 software flow chart 2.2.2 software code    Code is modified based on SDK_2.3.0_LPCXpresso54608 usart interrupt, the modified code is as follows: void DEMO_USART_IRQHandler ( void ) {      if ( DEMO_USART -> STAT & USART_INTENSET_DELTARXBRKEN_MASK ) // detect LIN break      {        DEMO_USART -> STAT | = USART_INTENSET_DELTARXBRKEN_MASK ; // clear the bit        Lin_BKflag = 1 ;        cnt = 0 ;        state = RECV_SYN ;        DisableLinBreak ;            }     if ( ( kUSART_RxFifoNotEmptyFlag | kUSART_RxError ) & USART_GetStatusFlags ( DEMO_USART ) )      {        USART_ClearStatusFlags ( DEMO_USART , kUSART_TxError | kUSART_RxError ) ;           rxbuff [ cnt ] = USART_ReadByte ( DEMO_USART ) ; ;                   switch ( state )          {             case RECV_SYN :                           if ( 0x55 == rxbuff [ cnt ] )                           {                               state = RECV_PID ;                           }                           else                           {                               state = IDLE ;                               DisableLinBreak ;                           }                           break ;             case RECV_PID :                           if ( 0xAD == rxbuff [ cnt ] )                           {                               state = RECV_DATA ;                           }                           else if ( 0XEC == rxbuff [ cnt ] )                           {                               state = SEND_DATA ;                           }                           else                           {                               state = IDLE ;                               DisableLinBreak ;                           }                           break ;             case RECV_DATA :                           recdatacnt ++ ;                           if ( recdatacnt >= 4 ) // 3 Bytes data + 1 Bytes checksum                           {                               recdatacnt = 0 ;                               state = RECV_SYN ;                               EnableLinBreak ;                           }                           break ;          default : break ;                                    }                   cnt ++ ;      }       /* Add for ARM errata 838869, affects Cortex-M4, Cortex-M4F Store immediate overlapping       exception return operation might vector to incorrect interrupt */ #if defined __CORTEX_M && (__CORTEX_M == 4U)     __DSB ( ) ; #endif } /*! * @brief Main function */ int main ( void ) {     usart_config_t config ;     /* attach 12 MHz clock to FLEXCOMM0 (debug console) */     CLOCK_AttachClk ( BOARD_DEBUG_UART_CLK_ATTACH ) ;     BOARD_InitPins ( ) ;     BOARD_BootClockFROHF48M ( ) ;     BOARD_InitDebugConsole ( ) ;     /*      * config.baudRate_Bps = 19200U;      * config.parityMode = kUSART_ParityDisabled;      * config.stopBitCount = kUSART_OneStopBit;      * config.loopback = false;      * config.enableTxFifo = false;      * config.enableRxFifo = false;      */     USART_GetDefaultConfig ( & config ) ;     config . baudRate_Bps = BOARD_DEBUG_UART_BAUDRATE ;     config . enableTx = true ;     config . enableRx = true ;     USART_Init ( DEMO_USART , & config , DEMO_USART_CLK_FREQ ) ;     /* Enable RX interrupt. */     DEMO_USART -> INTENSET | = USART_INTENSET_DELTARXBRKEN_MASK ; //USART_INTENSET_STARTEN_MASK |     USART_EnableInterrupts ( DEMO_USART , kUSART_RxLevelInterruptEnable | kUSART_RxErrorInterruptEnable ) ;     EnableIRQ ( DEMO_USART_IRQn ) ;     while ( 1 )     {          if ( state == SEND_DATA )        {         while ( kUSART_TxFifoNotFullFlag & USART_GetStatusFlags ( DEMO_USART ) )         {             USART_WriteByte ( DEMO_USART , 0X01 ) ;             break ;   //just send one byte, otherwise, will send 16 bytes         }         while ( kUSART_TxFifoNotFullFlag & USART_GetStatusFlags ( DEMO_USART ) )         {             USART_WriteByte ( DEMO_USART , 0X02 ) ;             break ;   //just send one byte, otherwise, will send 16 bytes         }         while ( kUSART_TxFifoNotFullFlag & USART_GetStatusFlags ( DEMO_USART ) )         {             USART_WriteByte ( DEMO_USART , 0X10 ) ; // 0X10 correct 0Xaa wrong             break ;   //just send one byte, otherwise, will send 16 bytes                    }               recdatacnt = 0 ;           state = RECV_SYN ;           EnableLinBreak ;        }          } } ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ 3 LPC54608 LIN slave test result   Master define two frames : Unconditional ID Protected ID Direction Data checksum 0X2C 0XEC subscriber 0x01,0x02 0x10 0X2D 0XAD Publisher 0x01,0x02,0x03 0x4c   Now, LIN master send the above two frame to the slave LIN, give the test result and the wave from the LIN bus. 3.1 LIN master configuration Uart baud rate is: 19200bps 3.2 send 0X2C,0X2D frames From the above test result, we can find 0X2D send successfully, 0X2C can receive the data from the LIN save side, the received data is 0X01,0X02 and the checksum 0x10. 3.2.1 0X2D frame LIN bus wave and debug result   From the LIN slave debug result, we can find LIN slave can receive the correct data from the LIN master, and after check, the checksum also correct. 3.2.2 0X2C frame LIN bus wave From the LIN Master tool interface, we can find if the slave give the wrong checksum 0XAA, the master will also can find the checksum is wrong. This is the according LIN bus wave with wrong checksum. From the above test result, we can find LPC54608 LIN slave, can receive the correct LIN bus data, and send back the correct LIN data to the master.
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Introduction Amazon Web Services (AWS) is the world’s most comprehensive and broadly adopted cloud platform, offering over 165 fully-featured services from data centers globally. Millions of customers —including the fastest-growing startups, largest enterprises, and leading government agencies—trust AWS to power their infrastructure, become more agile, and lower costs.This document will take you step-by-step in a simple approach to adding peripherals to your AWS IOT and Alexa skills project. This is in continuation of the demo established in the following link, it is important to have this completed before continuing with this guide: Connecting the LPC55S69 to Amazon Web Services  Prerequisites - LPC55S69-EVK - Mikroe WiFi 10 Click - AWS Account - Alexa Developer Account - MCUXpresso IDE 11.2 - LPC55S69 SDK 2.8.0 Modifying "AWS_REMOTE_CONTROL_WIFI" In this example I will be adding a single-ended ADC peripheral. 1. First, create a separate .c and .h files in my source folder to keep it organized.  2. Initialize your peripheral. This includes your global variables, pins, clocks, interrupt handlers and other necessary peripheral configurations yours may have.  In my new_peripherals.c file, I add the following 2.1 Definitions: 2.2 Global variables: 2.3 Interrupt handler: 2.4 Initialization function: 2.5 Read ADC Function: 3.  Create header file with the two functions that will be used to enable the ADC, make sure to include the "fsl_lpadc"drivers. 4.  Add the ADC pin with pin configuration tool.  4.1 In this example I use PIO0_23 for the ADC0 Channel 0, 5. Add ADC_Init function to the main. 6. Now let's go ahead and modify "remote_control.c". Here we need to build the JSON text that we want updating our Thing's shadow with the ADC value, add the read function, add the variable in the initial shadow document and the keyword for our DeltaJSON. 6.1 First create global variables for the actual state of the ADC interaction and the parsed state. 6.2 Add external function which will read the ADC value. 6.3 Shadows use   JSON shadow documents   to store and retrieve data. A shadow’s document contains a state property that describes these aspects of the device’s state: desired: Apps specify the desired states of device properties by updating the desired object. reported: Devices report their current state in the reported object. delta: AWS IoT reports differences between the desired and the reported state in the delta object. 6.4 I've added the initial ADC state with a hard-coded 0, so that I can verify my Thing's shadow is initialized with the new information. 6.5 In the "void processShadowDeltaJSON(char *json, uint32_t jsonLength)" function, we need to add the condition for the change in state of the ADC. This will helps us identify when the action to read the ADC is requested. 6.6 Finally in the "prvShadowMainTask" function, we will create the action based on the above request. We can add some PRINTFs so that we know that the action is requested and processed properly through the serial console. As you may see I only want to update the ADC value when it is requested. Meaning the value of the ADC's state or parsed state is important. We will clear it to zero after we read the ADC and only update the value when it is 1. As opposed to the LEDState and parsedLEDState, where the value is important since it points to which color LED will be on/off. That's it you can build and run the project! Now we can add the Alexa Skill and the functionality in the AWS Lambda. MODIFYING AWS LAMBDA Since the lambda will be the connection between our LPCXpresso board and the Alexa Skill, we need to add the handler for  our new ADC requests. 1.  In this example we add the third request type which is the ADC event and the name of the callback function we will use.  2. The callback function "manage_ADC_request" will contain the attributes for reading and updating the shadow, this will consequently cause the change in delta shadow so our LPC55S69 will read the ADC pin. In addition, the utterances sent to the Alexa skill as well as how we want Alexa to respond will also be defined here.  As you may observe our function builds the JSON payload to update the shadow with a "1" when it is called and ignores the led and accelerometer values. We delay for 2.5 seconds to allow the LPC to read and write the ADC value in the necessary field and send the updated shadow. Then the Lambda will read the shadow and create the return message.  With this we construct the answer for Alexa. MODIFYING ALEXA SKILLS 1.  First create a custom 'intent'. Here is the general definition of what the utterances will be to request an action from the AWS Thing.    1.1 The name needs to match the name used for the event in the Lambda. In this example it is ADC_INTENT 2. Before we create the utterances, let's create the slot types. This is the list of all the words possible that may come to mind that a user might say to request a reading from the ADC.  2.1 The name of the slot type is not crucial, however please note it as we will need it later.  2.2 Add slot values. You can add as many as you think are necessary. For recommendations on custom slot values please check, best practices for sample utterances. 2.3 Go back to the general view of the ADC_INTENT, scroll down and we will add how the slot will be included in the utterances. In this example I use adc_name, however the name here is also not crucial. Select the slot type list we created earlier. 2.4 Now scroll back up and lets begin adding the sample utterances. This can be any command that you believe a user can say to invoke this action. You do not need to include the wake word here. In brackets add the name of your intent slot, in this case it is {adc_name}. That's it! You can save and rebuild the model. You are now ready to test it. You can do so through the 'Test' tab on the developer's console. In addition if you have an Alexa device or the SLN-ALEXA-IOT, you can test it by speaking with Alexa directly. In your LPCXpresso55S69 you can connect the 3.3V or the 0V to the ADC pin so you can see how the value is returned every request. 
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This article mainly introduces how to config CTIMER match 3 trigger ADC in LPC804, includes how to config related registers, and the code under SDK. Other LPC serials, also can refer to this DOC. 1. How To Configure ADC Part. 2.How to Configure CTIMER Part 3.Project Basic Information 4.Reference   Project is attached, it base on MCUXpresso IDE v11.1.1,  LPCXpresso804 board.  
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T his article introduces how to create a custom board MCUXpresso SDK and how to use it, mainly includes three parts: Part1: Generating a Board Support Configuration (.mex) Part2: Create a Custom Board SDK Using the Board SDK Wizard Part3. Using the Custom SDK to Create a New Project   Requirements: MCUXpresso IDE v11.1.1, MCUXpresso SDK for LPC845, LPC845-BRK board. This method works for all NXP mcu which support by MCUXpresso SDK. About detail steps, please refer to attachment. Thanks!
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The documentation discusses how to generate phase-shift PWM signals based on SCTimer/PWM module, the code is developed based on MCUXpresso IDE version 10.3 and LPCXpresso5411x board. The LPC family has SCTimer/PWM module and CTimer modules, both of them can generate PWM signals, but only the SCTimer/PWM module  can generate phase-shift PWM signals. In the code, only the match registers are used to generate events, I/O signals are not used.  The match0 register is set up as (SystemCoreClock/100), which determines the PWM signal frequency. The the match1 register is set up as 0x00, which generate event1. The the match2 register is set up as (SystemCoreClock/100)/2;, which generate event2. The duty cycle is (SystemCoreClock/100)/2-0x00= (SystemCoreClock/100)/2, which is 50% duty cycle, the cycle time is (SystemCoreClock/100). The event1 sets the SCT0_OUT1, event2 clears the SCT0_OUT1, so SCT0_OUT1 has 50% duty cycle. The the match3 register is set up as (SystemCoreClock/100)/4;, which generate even3. The the match4 register is set up as 3*(SystemCoreClock/100)/4, which generate event4. The duty cycle is 3*(SystemCoreClock/100)/4  -  (SystemCoreClock/100)/4= (SystemCoreClock/100)/2, which is 50% duty cycle. The event3 sets the SCT0_OUT2, event4 clears the SCT0_OUT2, so SCT0_OUT2 has 50% duty cycle. The phase shift is (SystemCoreClock/100)/4 - 0x00= (SystemCoreClock/100)/4, which corresponds 90 degree phase shift. PWM initilization code: //The SCT0_OUT1 can output PWM signal with 50 duty cycle from PIO0_8 pin //The SCT_OUT2 can output PWM signal with 50 duty cycle fron PIO0_9 pin //The SCT0_OUT1 and SCT0_OUT2 PWM signal has 90 degree phase shift. void SCT0_PWM(void) {     SYSCON->AHBCLKCTRL[1]|=(1<<2); //SET SCT0 bit     SCT0->CONFIG = (1 << 0) | (1 << 17); // unified 32-bit timer, auto limit     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[0] = SystemCoreClock/100; // match 0 @ 100 Hz = 10 msec     SCT0->EVENT[0].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 0 happens in all states     //set event1     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[1]=0x00;     SCT0->EVENT[1].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 1 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[1].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(1<<0); // match 1 condition only     //set event2     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[2]=(SystemCoreClock/100)/2;     SCT0->EVENT[2].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 2 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[2].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(2<<0); // match 2 condition only     //set event3     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[3]=(SystemCoreClock/100)/4;     SCT0->EVENT[3].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 3 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[3].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(3<<0); // match 3 condition only     //set event4     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[4]=3*(SystemCoreClock/100)/4;     SCT0->EVENT[4].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 4 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[4].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(4<<0); // match 4 condition only     //PWM output1 signal     SCT0->OUT[1].SET = (1 << 1); // event 1 will set SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->OUT[1].CLR = (1 << 2); // event 2 will clear SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->RES |= (3 << 2); // output 0 toggles on conflict     //PWM output2 signal     SCT0->OUT[2].SET = (1 << 3); // event 3 will set SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->OUT[2].CLR = (1 << 4); // event 4 will clear SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->RES = (3 << 4); // output 0 toggles on conflict     //PWM start     SCT0->CTRL &= ~(1 << 2); // unhalt by clearing bit 2 of the CTRL } Pin initialization code: //PIO0_8 PIO0_8 FC2_RXD_SDA_MOSI SCT0_OUT1 CTIMER0_MAT3 //PIO0_9 PIO0_9 FC2_TXD_SCL_MISO SCT0_OUT2 CTIMER3_CAP0 - FC3_CTS_SDA_SSEL0 void SCTimerPinInit(void) {     //Enable the     SCTimer clock     SYSCON->AHBCLKCTRL[0]|=(1<<13); //set IOCON bit     //SCTimer pin assignment     IOCON->PIO[0][8]=0x182;     IOCON->PIO[0][9]=0x182;     IOCON->PIO[0][10]=0x182; } Main Code: #include <stdio.h> #include "board.h" #include "peripherals.h" #include "pin_mux.h" #include "clock_config.h" #include "LPC54114_cm4.h" void SCT0_Init(void); void SCTimerPinInit(void); void P1_9_GPIO(void); void SCT0_PWM(void); int main(void) {       /* Init board hardware. */     BOARD_InitBootPins();     BOARD_InitBootClocks();     BOARD_InitBootPeripherals();     printf("Hello World\n");    // SCT0_Init();    // P1_9_GPIO();     SCTimerPinInit();     SCT0_PWM();     /* Force the counter to be placed into memory. */     volatile static int i = 0 ;     /* Enter an infinite loop, just incrementing a counter. */     while(1) {         i++ ;     }     return 0 ; } The Yellow channel is PIO0_8 pin output signal, which is SCT0_OUT1 PWM output signal. The Bule channel is PIO0_9 pin output signal, which is SCT0_OUT2 PWM output signal.
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Now that you've downloaded & unzipped your LPCXpresso54608 SDK, let's open KEIL  uVision IDE. Note: you must have at least uVision version 5.22.0.0 to use this board Before we start utilizing uVision we must make sure that we have the relevant packs installed to work with the LPCXpresso54608 board. Select the Pack Installer on the toolbar. The Pack installer shows you which parts and boards for which you have support. On the left hand side you see a variety of different manufacturers. The easiest way to search will be to type 'lpc' into the search right below the devices tab. Then select 'LPC54000 Series'. On the right hand side under the packs tab you will see one item listed under 'Device Specific' called 'Keil::LPC54000_DFP' click on install Note: Version 2.1.0 released on 10-18-2016 added LPC5460x support. If you had downloaded this pack before go to Packs>Check for Updates at the top to download the latest version Once installed the diamond will turn green. To double check we are ready, select boards on the left side and search  'lpcxpresso54'. You will notice that our board is green indicating we have support for it in uVision. Now we can close the Pack Installer to return to uVision Select File>Open and navigate to the location you unzipped your SDK download.  By the way, within this folder there are plenty of SDK based demos for you to explore our microcontroller.  We will use one of them to guide you through this tutorial, but definitely take time to try all of them! Navigate to boards>lpcxpresso54608>demo_apps>touch_cursor>mdk, change file type to ''Project Files (*.uvproj, *.uvprojx) and select 'touch_cursor' Once opened, select 'Build' right above the Project window. Once the Build Output window tells you that you have successfully built the program select the 'Start/Stop Debug Session' icon. Note: You may receive a warning if you have a size limitation on the license you are using. If you do get a warning you can resolve licensing issues by going to File>License Management. Once the debug session has been started select 'Run' on the left side Once you have successfully flashed the board with this demo you will see the following, This demo utilizes the touch interface on the screen to read where you are touching and updates the cursor position to the last known location.   Remember that other demos and sample code are provided in the root folder of the SDK download.   Be sure to explore these demos and reach out on the community if you need help!
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Now that you've downloaded & unzipped your LPCXpresso54608 SDK, let's open IAR Embedded Workbench IDE. Note: You must have at least IAR Embedded Workbench version 7.80.3.12146 to use this board Once open, select File>Open>Workspace Navigate to the location where you unzipped your SDK files. Within this folder there are plenty of SDK based demos for you to explore our microcontroller.  We will use one of them to guide you through this tutorial, but definitely take time to try all of them! Select boards>lpcxpresso54608>demo_apps>touch_cursor>iar>touch_cursor Once the workspace is loaded, you will see the project files on the left.  Along the toolbar the first highlighted item is 'Build' select it. Once your console shows no errors you can select the 'Download and Debug' a few icons to the right of 'Build' Your debug session will start and will look like the following window.  Once it opens 'touch_cursor.c' and has a green arrow next to the main function you can select 'Go' After you have successfully flashed the board with this demo you will see the following on your board. This demo utilizes the touch interface on the screen to read where you are touching and updates the cursor position to the last known location.   Remember that other demos and sample code are provided in the root folder of the SDK download.   Be sure to explore these demos and reach out on the community if you need help!
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Getting Started with LPCXpresso54608  & MCUXpresso is pretty straight forward, but we want to make the process even easier.  So we created a  simple guide to walk you through the getting started process,         LPCXpresso54608: Out of Box & Getting Started Introduction LPC5460x MCU Family part numbering & feature summary table (highlighted in yellow are the first of many parts to be released). If it wasn't already clear, LPCXpresso54608 is the superset development board for our LPC5460x MCU Family. NXP.com Board Page Board Part Number (OM13092) Board User Manual (UM11035) Board Schematics Key features of the LPCXpresso54608 development board, 272x480 color LCD with capacitive touch screen On-board, high-speed USB, Link2 debug probe with CMSIS-DAP and SEGGER J-Link protocol options UART and SPI port bridging from LPC546xx target to USB via the on-board debug probe Support for external debug probe 3 x user LEDs, plus Reset, ISP (3) and user buttons Multiple Expansion options, including Arduino UNO and PMod Built-in power consumption measurement for target LPC546xx MCU 128Mb Micron MT25QL128 Quad-SPI flash 8MB Micron MT48LC8M16A2B4 SDRAM Knowles SPH0641LM4H digital microphone Full size SD/MMC card slot NXP MMA8652FCR1 accelerometer Stereo audio codec with line in/out High and full speed USB ports with micro A/B connector for host or device functionality 10/100Mbps Ethernet (RJ45 connector)
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First, download the LPCXpresso54608 board User Manual.  After scanning the document, let's get started! Plug in LPCXpresso54608 (as shown below).  You will see the pre-loaded, Out of Box demo, which features Draupner TouchGFX.  A screen shot is shown below, Once you've explored the pre-loaded demo, you will likely want to learn more.   For this you will need to configure and build an  MCUXpresso Software Development Kit (SDK)  for your LPCXpresso54608 development board. Register or use your login credentials to sign in and download software from NXP. You can create a configuration for the LPCXpresso54608 in one of two ways: By typing 'LPCXpresso54608' or selecting boards>LPC>LPCXpresso54608 Once you have selected the board you will be presented with two options: 'Select Configuration' or 'Specify Additional Configuration Settings'. (It is recommended that you name the configuration something that specifies the settings as this will help identify multiple configurations.)   Note: By default the SDK Builder will choose IAR as the default toolchain for Windows.  For this tutorial we will use Windows as our Development Host OS.  If this is not the desired toolchain or OS please 'Select 'Specify Additional Configuration Settings' The following window will be presented, which allows you to download an SDK for IAR, Keil or Both (selecting 'All toolchains'.).  During this stage, you can also specify any necessary middleware for your download.  You can select or deselect these under the 'Select Optional Middleware' Select 'Go to SDK builder' once you have made your choices. Note:You may be prompted to update your info before you are allowed to download the package. If this happens select the link in the red at the top to resolve any issues. Once the information is updated you can click on the 'Overview' at the top and reselect 'SDK Builder' to return to the screen you were on. You have the opportunity to rename your file one last time before you hit download now. Once you select 'Download Now' you will be presented with a license agreement and once agreed to the download will start. Once you have downloaded the packaged .zip use your favorite utility to extract to a known location --> Continue here if IAR is your selected default toolchain. --> Continue here if KEIL is your selected default toolchain. --> Continue here if MCUXpresso is your selected default toolchain (coming March 2017!)
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