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The documentation discusses how to generate phase-shift PWM signals based on SCTimer/PWM module, the code is developed based on MCUXpresso IDE version 10.3 and LPCXpresso5411x board. The LPC family has SCTimer/PWM module and CTimer modules, both of them can generate PWM signals, but only the SCTimer/PWM module  can generate phase-shift PWM signals. In the code, only the match registers are used to generate events, I/O signals are not used.  The match0 register is set up as (SystemCoreClock/100), which determines the PWM signal frequency. The the match1 register is set up as 0x00, which generate event1. The the match2 register is set up as (SystemCoreClock/100)/2;, which generate event2. The duty cycle is (SystemCoreClock/100)/2-0x00= (SystemCoreClock/100)/2, which is 50% duty cycle, the cycle time is (SystemCoreClock/100). The event1 sets the SCT0_OUT1, event2 clears the SCT0_OUT1, so SCT0_OUT1 has 50% duty cycle. The the match3 register is set up as (SystemCoreClock/100)/4;, which generate even3. The the match4 register is set up as 3*(SystemCoreClock/100)/4, which generate event4. The duty cycle is 3*(SystemCoreClock/100)/4  -  (SystemCoreClock/100)/4= (SystemCoreClock/100)/2, which is 50% duty cycle. The event3 sets the SCT0_OUT2, event4 clears the SCT0_OUT2, so SCT0_OUT2 has 50% duty cycle. The phase shift is (SystemCoreClock/100)/4 - 0x00= (SystemCoreClock/100)/4, which corresponds 90 degree phase shift. PWM initilization code: //The SCT0_OUT1 can output PWM signal with 50 duty cycle from PIO0_8 pin //The SCT_OUT2 can output PWM signal with 50 duty cycle fron PIO0_9 pin //The SCT0_OUT1 and SCT0_OUT2 PWM signal has 90 degree phase shift. void SCT0_PWM(void) {     SYSCON->AHBCLKCTRL[1]|=(1<<2); //SET SCT0 bit     SCT0->CONFIG = (1 << 0) | (1 << 17); // unified 32-bit timer, auto limit     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[0] = SystemCoreClock/100; // match 0 @ 100 Hz = 10 msec     SCT0->EVENT[0].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 0 happens in all states     //set event1     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[1]=0x00;     SCT0->EVENT[1].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 1 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[1].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(1<<0); // match 1 condition only     //set event2     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[2]=(SystemCoreClock/100)/2;     SCT0->EVENT[2].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 2 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[2].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(2<<0); // match 2 condition only     //set event3     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[3]=(SystemCoreClock/100)/4;     SCT0->EVENT[3].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 3 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[3].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(3<<0); // match 3 condition only     //set event4     SCT0->SCTMATCHREL[4]=3*(SystemCoreClock/100)/4;     SCT0->EVENT[4].STATE = 0xFFFFFFFF; // event 4 happens in all states     SCT0->EVENT[4].CTRL = (1 << 12)|(4<<0); // match 4 condition only     //PWM output1 signal     SCT0->OUT[1].SET = (1 << 1); // event 1 will set SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->OUT[1].CLR = (1 << 2); // event 2 will clear SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->RES |= (3 << 2); // output 0 toggles on conflict     //PWM output2 signal     SCT0->OUT[2].SET = (1 << 3); // event 3 will set SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->OUT[2].CLR = (1 << 4); // event 4 will clear SCT1_OUT0     SCT0->RES = (3 << 4); // output 0 toggles on conflict     //PWM start     SCT0->CTRL &= ~(1 << 2); // unhalt by clearing bit 2 of the CTRL } Pin initialization code: //PIO0_8 PIO0_8 FC2_RXD_SDA_MOSI SCT0_OUT1 CTIMER0_MAT3 //PIO0_9 PIO0_9 FC2_TXD_SCL_MISO SCT0_OUT2 CTIMER3_CAP0 - FC3_CTS_SDA_SSEL0 void SCTimerPinInit(void) {     //Enable the     SCTimer clock     SYSCON->AHBCLKCTRL[0]|=(1<<13); //set IOCON bit     //SCTimer pin assignment     IOCON->PIO[0][8]=0x182;     IOCON->PIO[0][9]=0x182;     IOCON->PIO[0][10]=0x182; } Main Code: #include <stdio.h> #include "board.h" #include "peripherals.h" #include "pin_mux.h" #include "clock_config.h" #include "LPC54114_cm4.h" void SCT0_Init(void); void SCTimerPinInit(void); void P1_9_GPIO(void); void SCT0_PWM(void); int main(void) {       /* Init board hardware. */     BOARD_InitBootPins();     BOARD_InitBootClocks();     BOARD_InitBootPeripherals();     printf("Hello World\n");    // SCT0_Init();    // P1_9_GPIO();     SCTimerPinInit();     SCT0_PWM();     /* Force the counter to be placed into memory. */     volatile static int i = 0 ;     /* Enter an infinite loop, just incrementing a counter. */     while(1) {         i++ ;     }     return 0 ; } The Yellow channel is PIO0_8 pin output signal, which is SCT0_OUT1 PWM output signal. The Bule channel is PIO0_9 pin output signal, which is SCT0_OUT2 PWM output signal.
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The following document contains a list of documents, questions and discussions that are relevant in the community based on the amount of views they are receiving each month. If you are having a problem, doubt or getting started in LPC or MCUXpresso you should check the following links to see if your doubt have been already solved in the following documents and discussions. MCUXpresso MCUXpresso Supported Devices Table  FAQ: MCUXpresso Software and Tools  How to create a new LPC project using LPCOpen and MCUXpresso IDE  Introducing MCUXpresso SDK v.2 for LPC54xxx Series  Generating a downloadable MCUXpresso SDK v.2 package  Using the MCUXpresso Pins Tool   MCUXpresso Config Tools is now available!   LPC55xx Multicore Applications with MCUXpresso IDE  LPC information LPC5460x MCU Family Overview  USB with NXP Microcontrollers LWIP memory requirements  LPC800 Four-Part Webinar Series!  The LPC804 Programmable Logic Unit (PLU)   LPC84x Technical Training - Now Available Guides and Examples Flashing and Installing the new firmware and drivers for LPC11U35 debug probes  Enabling debug output  USB FLASH download, programming, and security tool (DFUSec)  DMA Ping-Pong application  Getting start with LPCXpresso54608 &amp; emWin Graphics;  Capacitive Touch example using the LPC845 Breakout Board  OLED Display Application Example using LPC845 Breakout Board and SPI  Mixed-Signal Logic Analyzer &amp; Oscilloscope (Lab Tool) Solution  LPC FAQ How to calculate the value of crystal load capacitors? Can I send a message with X/Y/Z bits in the ID?  What is the difference between error active and error passive? What is the sample point for?  How can I verify the configured CAN bitrate, using an oscilloscope? 
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In this document, I will explain how to create a project to use the SPIFI library version 1.03 with the LPC4370. For this we will need the following tools: MCUXpresso IDE 10.2. Link LPC-LINK2 to use it as an evaluation board for the LPC4370. Link External debugger. In my case, I used another LPC-LINK2 board. LPCOpen v2_12 for the LPC4370, this version comes with the installation of MCUXpresso IDE. SPIFI library v1.3. Link Code Example lpcopen_2_12_lpcxpresso_ngx_xplorer_1830_SPIFI_v1.0. Link First, download and install all the tools needed. In your workspace of MCUXpresso we will import (1) three projects of the LPCOpen v2_12 for the LPC4370: periph_blinky, lpc_board_nxp_lpclink2_4370 and lpc_chip_43xx.  The LPCOpen zip file is in the next path of your PC: C:\nxp\MCUXpressoIDE_10.2.1_795\ide\Examples\LPCOpen (2) Extract the files of the zip named lpclibspifi_lpcxpresso_1.03_68 that we downloaded before. The folder that we need is spifilib_m4f. Drag and drop this folder into the Project Explorer on your workspace of the LPC4370, after choosing copy and you should see the spifilib_m4f in your Project Explorer. Once you imported correctly the SPIFI library, select the library (1) on the project explorer window and build it (2) . Once you do this you should see that a new folder called Debug appear (3) . Now we need to edit the properties of the periph_blinky example to add the library spifilib_m4f to the project. To do this, right click on the project and click properties. Once in the properties window click on C/C++ Build (1) > Settings (2) > Includes (under the section MCU C Compiler) (3) . In the includes window click Add… (1) > Workspace (2) > spifilib_m4f (3) > inc (4) > click OK (5) on the window Folder Selection > click OK (6) on the window Add directory path. You should see the following on the include paths. Now, go to the libraries (1) option under the section MCU Linker, on the section Libraries (-I) click Add… (2) finally write the name of the library (spifilib_m4f) (3) and click OK (4) . Under the section Library search path (-L) click Add… (1) > Workspace (2) > spifilib_m4f (3) > Debug (4) > OK (5) . If you see the same as shown in the below image you are good to go so click Apply and close. To check if you did the below steps correct let’s do the following. On the project periph_blinky in the file systick.c include the file spifilib_api.h and compile the project. If the project compiles without problems it means that you imported correctly the spifi library. If you found problems please stop and repeat all the steps mentioned before. Now that we added successfully the library we can start to migrate the example for the LPC1830 that we download before. First, unzip the file lpcopen_2_12_lpcxpresso_ngx_xplorer_1830_SPIFI_v1.0. Once you unzipped the file go to the following path: spifilib_blinky > example > src. Open the file named Blinky.c and copy all the content of the file. Now go to the file systick.c on your workspace of MCUXpresso within the project periph_blinky, delete all the content of this file and paste what you copied before. Do not compile at this point or you will receive multiple errors! Go back to the path spifilib_blinky > example > src on your PC. Drag and drop the file called spifi_setup.c into the folder src of your project periph_blinky on your Workspace. Open the file that we just copy into our workspace and go to line 46 of the code. Here we are creating a buffer of 64KB that we will use later to write in the SPIFI. The __BSS(RAM3) is to save this buffer in the RAM block three of memory. The problem here is that the block of RAM3 in the LPC4370 is not big enough to store the buffer of 64KB (see below image), so let’s change this for either RAM or RAM2 that are big enough to store the buffer. Now that we added the spifi_setup file let’s go back to the systick.c file and add the external declaration for the function spifiSetUp. At this point, if we compile the project we shouldn’t see any problems, only some warnings because of the functions and variables that we are not using. We are almost done, we are missing the most important thing. With this demo you will be writing, deleting and reading the SPIFI memory, this means that you cannot be executing form the SPIFI flash memory. You need to move to the RAM memory all the functions that are going to make this. This is the reason why in the file systick.c we don’t have any function that interacts directly with the SPIFI, this will make much easier the work of moving all the functions that interact with the SPIFI memory to RAM. The function spifiSetUp is the one that will make all the tests on the SPIFI and it is in the spifi_setup file, so we will need to move this entire file to RAM along with the SPIFI library. We will use three different scripts to move the library and the file spifi_setup to RAM. You can learn more about this in the following community post: https://community.nxp.com/thread/389110. First, right click on the folder of the project > new > folder, the name of the folder must be linkscripts. According to the sections Relocating particular objects into RAM and Relocating particular libraries into RAM of the community post mentioned before we need to create three files in this new folder: main_text.ldt, main_rodata.ldt and main_data.ldt. To do this, right click on the folder linkscripts > new > file. Here is the content that you should have on the three files that we just created. Do not include on the files the text that is in bold, that's just for reference! File main_data.ldt *libspifilib_m4f.a:(.text*) *libspifilib_m4f.a:(.rodata .rodata.* .constdata .constdata.*) *spifi_setup.o(.text*) *spifi_setup.o(.rodata .rodata.* .constdata .constdata.*) . = ALIGN(${text_align}); *(.data*) File main_rodata.ldt *(EXCLUDE_FILE(*libspifilib_m4f.a: *spifi_setup.o) .rodata) *(EXCLUDE_FILE(*libspifilib_m4f.a: *spifi_setup.o) .rodata.*) *(EXCLUDE_FILE(*libspifilib_m4f.a: *spifi_setup.o) .constdata) *(EXCLUDE_FILE(*libspifilib_m4f.a: *spifi_setup.o) .constdata.*) . = ALIGN(${text_align}); File main_text.ldt *(EXCLUDE_FILE(*libspifilib_m4f.a: *spifi_setup.o) .text*) After finishing with the three files you are done with the demo! It’s important to mention that if you want to go inside the function spifiSetUp while debugging you need to set a breakpoint inside the function. While debugging we can see that before calling the function spifiSetUp we are running from the SPIFI flash memory and once we enter to the function we are running from RAM memory. Once we run the demo successfully we should see the following in a terminal and the LED1 will be blinking. Hope this guide is helpful! Best Regards, Victor.
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Demo demonstrate how to use EMC to connect with external SDRAM.
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LPC4300 10-bit ADC module Introduction        LPC4300 Series microcontrollers combine the high performance and flexibility of an asymmetric dual-core architecture (ARM Cortex-M4F and Cortex-M0 coprocessor) with multiple high-speed connectivity options, advanced timers, analog, and optional security features to secure code and data communications. DSP capabilities enable all LPC43xx families to support complex algorithms in data-intensive application. Flash and Flashless options support large, flexible internal and external memory configurations.         LPC4370/LPC43S70 products provide 12-bit high-speed ADC module with up to 80MSamples/s. This document does not test 12-bit high-speed ADC performance. LPC43xx/LPC43Sxx series products provide two 10-bit SAR ADC module with below features: *   Measurement range 0 to 3.3 V *   10-bit conversion time = 2.45 us (up to 400K Samples/s) *   Burst conversion mode for single or multiple inputs *   Support hardware/software trigger *   Support Interrupt/DMA mode Test hardware platform introduction         This test hardware platform uses Keil MCB4357 evaluation board (OM13040), which enables customer to create and test working programs based on the LPC4300 family of Dual Core ARM Cortex™-M4/M0 devices. Keil MCB4357 with below features:   204 MHz LPC4357 device with ARM Cortex-M4 processor and Cortex-M0 coprocessor 136 KB On-Chip SRAM 1 MB dual bank On-Chip Flash On-Board Memory: 16 MB NOR Flash, 4 MB Quad-SPI Flash, 16 MB SDRAM & 16 KB EEPROM (I²C) Color QVGA TFT LCD with touchscreen High-speed USB 2.0 Host/Device/OTG interface (USB host + Micro USB Device/OTG connectors) Full-speed USB 2.0 Host/Device interface (USB host + micro USB Device connectors) MicroSD Card Interface Analog Voltage Control for ACD Input Audio CODEC with Line-In/Out and Microphone/headphone connector + Speaker Debug Interface Connectors 20-pin JTAG (0.1 inch) 10-pin Cortex debug (0.05 inch) 20-pin Cortex debug + ETM Trace (0.05 inch connector Test software introduction       This test software uses LPCOpen software ADC demo, the software version is V2.20.       ADC demo default path is:       ..\lpcopen_2_19_keil_iar_keil_mcb_4357\applications\lpc18xx_43xx\iar\keil_mcb_4357\periph_example.eww      LPCOpen software [ periph_example.eww ] project provides LPC4357 most modules driver application demos. The ADC demo need precompile MCB4357 board support package (lib_lpc_board_keil_mcb_4357) and LPC43xx chip driver (lib_lpc_chip_43xx). MCB4357 board support package provides MCB4357 board related pins configuration, clock configuration, on-board external memory configuration, Ethernet PHY driver configuration and board hardware resource configuration; LPC43xx chip driver provides LPC43xx modules driver API function.       ADC demo provides three modes to get ADC conversion value: polling mode, interrupt mode and DMA mode. The demo config 10-bit ADC module with 400K Samples/s and ARM Cortex-M4 core clock frequency with 204MHz. The test uses Timer0 module as time-base and counter reference clock is same with ARM Cortex-M4 core clock frequency (204MHz).       Timer0 initialization code comments: ADC module initialization code comments: ADC polling mode code comments: ADC interrupt mode code comments: ADC DMA mode code comments: Test result     The test will use TIMER0 counter to calculate each test item time interval.      The test includes below test items:      Single/no burst: ADC convert one time with burst mode disabled      100K/no burst: ADC convert 100K times with burst mode disabled      Single/burst: ADC convert one time with burst mode enabled      100K/burst: ADC convert 100K times with burst mode enabled
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