ASH WARE Simulator CRANK Generating from .csv File

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ASH WARE Simulator CRANK Generating from .csv File

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mertk
Contributor IV

Hello everyone,

I have a CRANK signal in .csv format that was obtained from an oscilloscope. Is it possible to analyze this CRANK signal using the ASH WARE eTPU2p DevTool program? I mean, I want to import .csv file into the ASH WARE program. I have done some research, but I couldn't find anything related to this. I hope you will clerify the topic for me.

Best regards,
Mert.

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johndiener
Contributor IV

Some ASH WARE users develop timing data in spreadsheets and then output it into the form of the test vector language for use in the simulation tool (see examples and documentation for details on the test vector language that can be used to drive input signals). Certainly the same technique can be used for .csv files. Large (many MB) test vector files have been used to exercise some very long simulations (hours to days) in the past.  This is a fairly straightforward technique.

Newer scripting capabilities support reading of .csv files into the script environment where the data could then be used to control timing and pin values via script commands. Almost for sure this would need to be done in its own script file, separate from the one that configures the eTPU and stimulates it via HSRs and memory writes. This is easy to do if a dual-engine (eTPU-A and B) simulation is set up - the main script file would be associated with eTPU-A, and the signal generation script would be associated with eTPU-B (but it could still drive pins on eTPU-A). What is the format of your .csv data?

John Diener

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johndiener
Contributor IV

Some ASH WARE users develop timing data in spreadsheets and then output it into the form of the test vector language for use in the simulation tool (see examples and documentation for details on the test vector language that can be used to drive input signals). Certainly the same technique can be used for .csv files. Large (many MB) test vector files have been used to exercise some very long simulations (hours to days) in the past.  This is a fairly straightforward technique.

Newer scripting capabilities support reading of .csv files into the script environment where the data could then be used to control timing and pin values via script commands. Almost for sure this would need to be done in its own script file, separate from the one that configures the eTPU and stimulates it via HSRs and memory writes. This is easy to do if a dual-engine (eTPU-A and B) simulation is set up - the main script file would be associated with eTPU-A, and the signal generation script would be associated with eTPU-B (but it could still drive pins on eTPU-A). What is the format of your .csv data?

John Diener
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johndiener
Contributor IV

I created an example project where signal timing data in a .csv file is read in and applied to an input via the scripting environment.  Here's a snapshot of what it looks like:

snapshot.png

I've also attached the entire example project to this post.

John Diener
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mertk
Contributor IV

Hi @johndiener,

Thanks for the answers. The .csv file that I wanted to create in simulator is simple. Every row includes the value of 0 or 5 which they shows the logic level of the CRANK signal as high or low. 

Now, with your help, I can create the signal in CRANK channel however the simulator is shut down after some time without any information. The .csv file includes nearly 5000000 point and period of every point is 20 us. 

Is the point number too large for the program or what? Do you have any idea? 

Best regards,

Mert. 

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johndiener
Contributor IV

Based on the behavior it appears that exceeds capacity, that will need to be looked at in more detail. But based on your description, the data probably contains a lot of unnecessary information.  Only points when the input changes are needed - I suspect you could filter the data down to a tenth of what it currently is (depending upon tooth configuration and RPM).  You would need to add actual time data to each remaining row, of course, as the 20us increment per row would no longer apply. For now that is the best recommendation I have.  The secondary recommendation would be to try converting the data to vector language format, as that was specifically designed for stimulating eTPU inputs.

John Diener
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mertk
Contributor IV

Hi @johndiener,

Thank you for helping me. I will try to develop a script that converts my data into the vector language format. 

Best regards,

Mert. 

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davidtosenovjan
NXP TechSupport
NXP TechSupport

Hi @johndiener , would you please help in this topic? Thanks

 

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