Wireless Connectivity Knowledge Base

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Wireless Connectivity Knowledge Base

Discussions

Sort by:
1 Introduction Two development boards transmit control information through ble. One development board connects to paj7620 and provides gesture information through IIC bus. The other development board uses ble and USB HID. Ble is used to receive data, and USB HID is used to simulate keyboard input and control ppt                  Figure  1 2 Preparation We need two development boards qn908x and gesture control device paj7620. We use IAR as development enviroment.The example we use is temperature_sensor, and temperature_ colloctor. The SDK version is 2.2.3   3 Code 3.1  temperature_sensor code We want to implement IIC to read gesture information from paj7620 and send data. The pins used by IIC are PA6 and PA7 Simply encapsulate the IIC reading and writing code in the code to create i2c_ operation.c and i2c_ operation.h. Realize IIC initialization and reading / writing register function in it                        Figure  2                        Figure  3   3.1.1 After having these functions, we begin to write gesture recognition code. First, we add two blank files paj7620.c and paj7620.h into our project.   Select bank register area                               Figure 4   Wake up paj7620 to read device state                    Figure 5   Initialize device                    Figure 6   Gesture test function                                   Figure 7   3.1.2 When you are ready to read the device information, You should initialize IIC and paj7620 in BleApp_Init function                                Figure 8 In principle, we need to create a custom service for the PAJ device, but we replace the temperature data as our gesture control data. If you want to create a custom service, refer to this link custom profile   3.1.3 Create a timer that sends gesture data regularly. In file temerature_sensor.c Define a timer , static tmrTimerID_t dataTimerId; Allocate a timer, dataTimerId = TMR_AllocateTimer(); Define the callback function of this timer                                           Figure 9 Start timer                                    Figure 10 Close the low power mode. #define cPWR_UsePowerDownMode 0 3.2 temperature_collector code The most important thing here is to port USB HID into our project. The USB  example we use is the USB keyboard and mouse. 3.2.1 Add the OSA and USB folder under the example to the project directory, and copy the file to the corresponding folder according to the file structure of the original example.                      Figure 11 3.2.2 Add header file directory after completion                                           Figure 12 At the same time, in this tab, add two macro definitions USB_STACK_FREERTOS_HEAP_SIZE=16384 USB_STACK_FREERTOS   3.2.3 Next, we need to modify the main function in usb example . Open composite.c file.                      Figure 13 It calls the APP_task. So this function also need to be modified.                                   Figure 14 3.2.4 Find hid_mouse.c , Comment function USB_DeviceHidMouseAction Find hid_keyboard.h. Define the gesture information.                                   Figure 15 Find hid_keyboard.c. We need to modify the function USB_DeviceHidKeyboardAction as following figure.                                                  Figure 16   Among them, we also need to implement the following function. When the up hand gesture is detected, the previous ppt will be played. The down hand gesture will be the next PPT, the left hand gesture will exit PPT, and the forward hand gesture will play ppt                                                  Figure 17 It also refers to an external variable gesture_from_server. The variable definition is in file temperature_ collocation.c,.     3.2.5 After that, let's go to BleApp_Statemachinehandler function in temperature_colloctor.c. In case mApppRunning_c, we will call usb_main to initialize USB HID                                                  Figure 18 3.2.6 In BleApp_PrintTemperature, we will save the gesture data to gesture_from_server                                                         Figure 19 We finished the all steps.        
View full article
Introduction   This post explains how to create a BLE GATT database using FSCI commands sent to the BLE Server device. Additionally, this document explains how to set up the fields of each FSCI command used to create the BLE GATT database for the BLE Server.   Main FSCI commands to create the BLE GATT DB in the BLE Server device   The following, are the main commands to create, write and read the GATT DB from the BLE Server perspective. The purpose of this post is to serve as a reference and summary of the most important commands. The full list of commands FSCI commands can be found in the Framework Serial Connectivity Interface (FSCI) for Bluetooth Low Energy Host Stack documentation within your SDK package. GATT-InitRequest This command is used to initialize the GATT database at runtime, and it must be sent before any other command to declare a database in your BLE Server device. GATTServer-RegisterCallback.Request This command installs an application callback for the GATT Server module, enabling the device to respond to the FSCI request from the CPU application through an FSCI indication. GATTDBDynamic-AddPrimaryServiceDeclaration.Request It adds a primary service to the database. It has 3 parameters that should be configured, the desired handle, the UUID type (16 bits, 32 bits, 128 bits), and the UUID value. Usually, the desired handle should be set to zero and the stack will assign the handle of the primary service automatically.   If the GATT application callback was installed through the GATTServer-RegisterCallback.Request command, the GATT Server responds to the GATTDBDynamic-AddPrimaryServiceDeclaration.Request command with a GATTDBDynamic-AddPrimaryServiceDeclaration.Indication that contains the handle assigned to the primary service. The following example shows how to prepare this command to define the battery service in the database. GATTDBDynamic-AddCharacteristicDeclarationAndValue.Request It adds a characteristic and its value to the database. It has 7 parameters that should be configured, the UUID type (16 bits, 32 bits, 128 bits), the UUID value, characteristic properties, the maximum length of the value (only for variable-length values), the initial length of the value, the initial value of the characteristic and value access permissions. The characteristic declared using this command, belongs to the last primary service declared in the database. For values with a fixed length, the maximum length parameter should be set to 0, and the length is obtained from the initial length of the value parameter.   If the GATT application callback was installed, the response of this command is indicated by the GATTDBDynamic-AddCharacteristicDeclarationAndValue.Indication command. The following example shows how to prepare this command to define the battery level characteristic in the database with a fixed length of 1 byte and an initial value of 90%. GATTDBDynamic-AddCharacteristicDescriptor.Request It adds a characteristic descriptor to the database. It has 5 parameters that should be configured, the UUID type (16 bits, 32 bits, 128 bits), UUID value, length of the descriptor value, descriptor’s value, and descriptor access permissions. The descriptor declared using this command, belongs to the last characteristic declared in the database.   If the GATT application callback was installed, the response of this command is indicated by the GATTDBDynamic-AddCharacteristicDescriptor.Indication command. The following example shows how to prepare this command to add the characteristic presentation format descriptor of the battery level characteristic in the database.   GATTDBDynamic-AddCccd.Request It adds a CCDD into the database. This command does not have parameters. The CCCD declared using this command, belongs to the last characteristic declared in the database. The response of this command is indicated by GATTDBDynamic-AddCccd.Indication.   GATTDB-FindServiceHandle.Request This command is used to find the handle of a service previously declared in the database. It has 3 parameters that should be configured, the handle to start the search (should be 1 on the first call), the UUID type of the service to find (16 bits, 32 bits, 128 bits), and the UUID value of the service that you are searching.   If the GATT application callback was installed, the response of this command is indicated by the GATTDB-FindServiceHandle.Indication command, which contains the handle of the found service. The following example shows how to prepare this command to find the handle of the battery service declared in the previous examples. Notice that the result of the search corresponds to the handle returned by the GATTDBDynamic-AddPrimaryServiceDeclaration.Indication as expected.   GATTDB-FindCharValueHandleInService It finds the characteristic´s handle of a given service previously declared in the database. It has 3 parameters that should be configured, the handle of the service that contains the characteristic, the UUID type of the characteristic to find (16 bits, 32 bits, 128 bits), and the UUID value of the characteristic that you are searching for.   If the GATT application callback was installed, the response of this command is indicated by the GATTDB-FindCharValueHandleInService.Indication command, which contains the handle of the found characteristic’s value. The following example shows how to prepare this command to find the handle of the battery level value. Notice that the result of the search corresponds to the handle returned by the GATTDBDynamic-AddCharacteristicDeclarationAndValue.Indication plus one, because the AddCharacteristicDeclarationAndValueIndication command returns the handle of the characteristic and, on the other hand, FindCharValueHandleInService returns the handle of the characteristic’s value. GATTDB-FindDescriptorHandleForcharValueHandle.Request It finds the descriptor´s handle of a given characteristic previously declared in the database. It has 3 parameters that should be configured, the handle of the characteristic’s value that contains the descriptor, the UUID type of the descriptor to find (16 bits, 32 bits, 128 bits), and the UUID value of the descriptor that you are searching.   If the GATT application callback was installed, the response of this command is indicated by the GATTDB-FindDescriptorHandleForCharValueHandle.Indication command, which contains the handle of the found descriptor. The following example shows how to prepare this command to find the handle of the characteristic presentation format descriptor. The result corresponds to the handle returned by the GATTDBDynamic-AddCharacteristicDescriptor.Indication   GATTDB-FindCccdHandleForCharValueHandle.Request It finds the CCCD’s handle of a given characteristic previously declared in the database. It has only one parameter, the handle of the characteristic’s value that contains the CCCD.   If the GATT application callback was installed, the response of this command is indicated by the GATTDB-FindCccdHandleForCharValueHandle.Indication command, which contains the handle of the found CCCD. The following example shows how to prepare this command to find the handle of CCCD. The result corresponds to the handle returned by the GATTDBDynamic-AddCccd.Indication.   GATTDB-WriteAttribute.Request It writes the value of a given attribute from the application level. It has 3 parameters that should be configured, the handle of the attribute that you want to write, the length of the value in bytes, and the new value.   In the following example, we will modify the battery level characteristic’s value from 90% to 80%.   GATTDB-ReadAttribute.Request   It reads the value of a given attribute from the application level. It has 2 parameters that should be configured, the handle of the attribute that you want to read, and the maximum bytes that you want to read. The GATT application callback must be installed, since the response of this command indicated by the GATTDB-ReadAttribute.Indication command contains the value read from the database. In the following example, we will read the battery level characteristic’s value, the result is 80%.      
View full article
Introduction The goal of this example is to demonstrate automatic role switching between Central and Peripheral of BLE QN9080 SIP and indicate the proximity of another BLE module using RSSI value. The automatic Role Switching feature can be used for continuously scan the presence of other BLE device and also to advertise so that other BLE device can scan it. The use case is to maintain social distancing and trigger a warning if the two devices are closer than a threshold distance. RSSI stands for Received Signal Strength Indicator which shows the power of received radio signal. Bare metal ‘Wireless_UART’ example is used from ‘SDK_2.x_QN908xCDK’ version 2.2.2 Timer Configuration As the device needs to switch its role after every particular time interval, so a timer is required to be initialized as it can be seen in below screenshot. Next step is to allocate Timer ID to the declared variable and start the timer. In this case, the timer shall go to callback function after the time(seconds) defined by the macro 'gSwitchTime'. This is done in 'BleApp_Config' function. After the specified time interval, timer stops and enters the callback function where switching of roles takes place. The main point that needs to be highlighted here is that while going into scanning mode, advertising mode should be stopped and vice versa. In advertising, the LED will be turned off. In scanning, the LED glows based on the RSSI. Central Configuration While in Central mode, device scans the presence of other bluetooth devices. Here, we need to check the RSSI value of received signals from those devices. There is a register available in QN9080 where the RSSI can be read after a received signal. RSSI is always negative, so the register stores the 2's compliment of the actual value. Below formula can be used to get the actual value of RSSI:- Actual RSSI = NOT(RSSI) + 1; This formula will give the positive value which is inversely proportional to Signal strength. In the callback function of scanning 'BleApp_ScanningCallback', filtering is applied and following decisions are taken based on filtered value:- Red LED will glow if the filtered value is lesser than a threshold value. Green LED will glow if the filtered value is greater than a threshold value. Hysteresis of 6 counts is taken to nullify the effect of fluctuation. As there is no need to make connections with the available devices, so the function requesting to make connection with the scanned device will be deleted. Peripheral Configuration Advertising interval can be changed as per requirement by making changes in the following macros:- To advertise at a fixed interval, value of minimum and maximum interval should be same. Test Setup Flash the code in two BLE EVK's. Power ON the EVK's. Red LED blinks if the EVK's are closer than a certain distance. Green LED blinks if the distance between the EVK's is greater than a threshold value. During blinking, When the LED is off, it means that the EVK is in advertising mode and when LED is ON(Red/Green), it means that EVK is in scanning mode. Note:- RSSI varies with environment, surrounding etc., so the threshold value of distance may vary with variation in testing condition. Demo code is attached for out of the box testing.
View full article
Introduction This document describes the steps needed to enable System View tool emphasizing in connectivity software stack for the QN9080CDK MCU.   Software Requirements QN908XCDK SDK 2.2.0 SystemView Software J-Link Software and Documentation Pack     Hardware Requirements QN9080CDK Board with J-Link debug interface   Enabling SystemView in IAR Embedded Workbench IDE   1. Unzip your QN908XCDK SDK. Open your desired project from:<SDK_install_path>/boards/qn908xcdk/wireless_examples/<Choose_your_project>/freertos/iar/<Your_project.eww>   2. Select the project in the workspace, press the right mouse button and select “Add->Add Group...” option       3. Create a new group called “SEGGER”, click on the “OK” button. Repeat the step 1 and create other groups called “Config” and “FreeRTOS_SEGGER”.     The workspace will be updated as shown below       4. Create folders called “SEGGER”, “Config” and “FreeRTOS_SEGGER” in the Windows directory at the following path:      <QN9080_SDK_root>/boards/qn908xcdk/wireless_examples/bluetooth/<your_example>/freertos       5. Add the following files in the recently created folders (SEGGER, Config and FreeRTOS_SEGGER) on Windows directory (the default SysView installation path is C:\Program Files (x86)\SEGGER\SystemView_V252c):   For the SEGGER folder:        All files located at <SysView_installation_path>\Src\SEGGER   For the Config folder:       All files located at <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Config   For the FreeRTOS_SEGGER folder:       <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Sample\FreeRTOSV9\SEGGER_SYSVIEW_FreeRTOS.c       <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Sample\FreeRTOSV9\SEGGER_SYSVIEW_FreeRTOS.h       <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Sample\FreeRTOSV9\Config\SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Config_FreeRTOS.c     6. Go to the workspace and click the right mouse button on “SEGGER”, “Config” and “FreeRTOS_SEGGER” groups, then select “Add->Add Files...” option. Add the following files:   For the SEGGER group:          All files in <QN9080_SDK_root>/boards/qn908xcdk/wireless_examples/bluetooth/<your_example>/freertos/SEGGER folder     For the Config group:        All files in <QN9080_SDK_root>/boards/qn908xcdk/wireless_examples/bluetooth/<your_example>/freertos/Config folder   For the FreeRTOS_SEGGER group:        All files in <QN9080_SDK_root>/boards/qn908xcdk/wireless_examples/bluetooth/<your_example>/freertos/FreeRTOS_SEGGER folder   The workspace will be updated as shown in the picture below       7. Select the project in the workspace and press Alt + F7. Go to “C/C++ Compiler” window and select “Preprocessor”. Include in “Additional include directories” view the following paths:   $PROJ_DIR$ /../Config $PROJ_DIR$ /../FreeRTOS_SEGGER $PROJ_DIR$ /../SEGGER       8. Go to “Assembler”, click on “Preprocessor”. Include the last paths on “Additional include directories” view as shown below. Click the OK button.     9. Replace the following files in the workspace with the files attached in this post (IAR files.zip). Make sure that each new file is located on the same path as the respectively last one.   freertos/FreeRTOS.h freertos/task.h freertos/tasks.c freertos/portable/portasm.s freertos/portable/port.c freertos/portable/portmacro.h   10. Add #include "SEGGER_SYSVIEW_FreeRTOS.h" at the end of the FreeRTOSConfig.h file located at source/FreeRTOSConfig.h in the workspace.       11. Search the “SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Config_FreeRTOS.c” file at FreeRTOS_SEGGER folder in the workspace. Modify the SYSVIEW_RAM_BASE value to the lowest RAM address (default 0x20000000 in QN9080) and add an extern declaration to the SystemCoreClock variable: extern uint32_t SystemCoreClock;‍‍       12. Search the “fsl_os_abstraction_free_rtos.c” file at framework/OSAbstraction folder in the workspace. Add #include "SEGGER_SYSVIEW.h" at the top of the file. Search the main function and add the following call to function inside:   SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Conf(); SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Start();‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍        13. Build and run your example. Run SystemView in your PC.     Enabling SystemView in MCUXpresso IDE 1. Install your QN908XCDK SDK in MCUXpresso IDE and import any freertos example from "wireless_examples" folder.  2. Select the project in the workspace, press the right mouse button and select "New->Source Folder" option     3. Create a new folder called “SEGGER”, click on the “Finish” button. Repeat the step 1 and create other folders called “Config” and “FreeRTOS_SEGGER”.     The workspace will be updated as shown below     4. Add the following files in the SEGGER, Config and FreeRTOS_SEGGER folders on the workspace dragging and dropping (the default SysView installation path is C:\Program Files (x86)\SEGGER\SystemView_V252c):   For the SEGGER folder:        All files located at <SysView_installation_path>\Src\SEGGER   For the Config folder:       All files located at <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Config   For the FreeRTOS_SEGGER folder:       <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Sample\FreeRTOSV9\SEGGER_SYSVIEW_FreeRTOS.c       <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Sample\FreeRTOSV9\SEGGER_SYSVIEW_FreeRTOS.h       <SysView_installation_path>\Src\Sample\FreeRTOSV9\Config\SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Config_FreeRTOS.c   When dragging and dropping, a new window will appear. Select "Copy files" in the button group and click "OK".       5. Select the project in the workspace, then go to "Project->Properties". The project properties window will be deployed.       6. Go to "C/C++ Build->Settings->Tool Settings->MCU C Compiler->Includes" view. Click on the "Green plus icon" in the "Include paths" view. A new window will appear, click on "Workspace..." button.       7. Select SEGGER, Config and FreeRTOS_SEGGER folders and click "OK", then click "Apply and Close" in the Project Properties window.   .   8. Replace the following files in the workspace with the files attached in this post (MCUXpresso files.zip).   freertos/FreeRTOS.h freertos/task.h freertos/tasks.c freertos/port.c freertos/portmacro.h   9. Add #include "SEGGER_SYSVIEW_FreeRTOS.h" at the end of the FreeRTOSConfig.h file located at source/FreeRTOSConfig.h in the workspace.     10. Search the “SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Config_FreeRTOS.c” file at FreeRTOS_SEGGER folder in the workspace. Modify the  SYSVIEW_RAM_BASE   value   to   the lowest RAM address (default 0x20000000 in QN9080) and add an extern declaration to the   SystemCoreClock   variable: extern uint32_t SystemCoreClock;‍‍   11. Search the “fsl_os_abstraction_free_rtos.c” file at framework/OSAbstraction/Source folder in the workspace. Add #include "SEGGER_SYSVIEW.h" at the top of the file. Search the main function and add the following call to function inside: SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Conf(); SEGGER_SYSVIEW_Start();‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍   12. Build and run your example. Run SystemView in your PC.
View full article
Many applications make use of 32 kHz clocks to keep tracking of real-time or to have a low power time reference for the system. Most of the systems might use a 32.768 kHz XTAL for this purpose. However, there might be some exceptions in which the application requires compensate the frequency of this clock due to temperature changes, aging, or just because the clock provides from a source which frequency is close to the ideal 32.768 kHz, but it presents some variations. QN908x devices require a 32 kHz clock source for some applications like running the BLE stack in low power. 32.768 kHz XTALs are more accurate so they are used to generate a 32 kHz source by compensating for the ppm difference. This provides us with tools to compensate for any external 32 kHz source by first obtaining the ppm difference from the ideal frequency. The solution consists in determining how off is the external clock input frequency from the ideal 32 kHz by making a comparison with a trusted clock in the system, typically the 32 MHz / 16 MHz XTAL. This process is executed in the background in an interrupt-based system so the application can initialize or run other processes in the meantime. Then, the results of the ppm calculation are reported to the main application to compensate for the changes and provide for a more accurate clock source. This example makes use of the following peripherals in the QN908x RTC Seconds Timer CTIMER DMA The RTC Seconds Timer uses the 32 kHz clock source as a reference. It contains an internal 32000 cycles counter that increases each 32 kHz clock period. On overflow, it rises the SEC_INT flag to indicate that one second has elapsed. The CTIMER makes use of the APB clock which derives from the 32 MHz / 16 MHz clock. This timer is used in free-running mode with a Prescaler value of 1 to count the number of APB pulses. The algorithm consists of counting the amount of APB pulses (trusted clock reference) elapsed by the time the RTC SEC_INT flag is set. Ideally, if both clocks are in the right frequency, the number of APB pulses must be equal to the reference clock frequency. For example, if the APB clock is 16 MHz, by the time the SEC_INT flag sets, the CTIMER counter must have a value of 16 x 10 6 counts. Assuming our reference clock is ideal, the difference between the CTIMER counter value and 16 x 10 6 can be used to obtain the ppm difference given the following formula. Where f 0 is the ideal APB frequency (16 MHz) and f 1 is the real measured frequency (CTIMER counter value). Since the pulses counted using the CTIMER correspond to the time it took to the RTC Seconds Timer to count one second, we can extrapolate the obtained ppm value as a difference in the 32 kHz clock source from the ideal 32 kHz. To prevent from any application or task servicing latency, the algorithm makes use of the DMA to automatically capture the CTIMER Counter value when the SEC_INT flag is set. The program flow is described in the diagram below. As a way of demonstrating this algorithm, two APIs were implemented to calculate the ppm value and apply the compensation to the system. Both APIs are included in the file fsl_osc_32k_cal .c and .h files. OSC_32K_CAL_GetPpm (osc_32k_cal_callback_t pCallbackFnc): Initializes the required timers and DMA and starts with the CTIMER capture. A callback is passed so it can be executed once the ppm calculation sequence completes. OSC_32_CAL_ApplyPpm (int32_t ppmMeasurement): Uses the previously calculated ppm passed as an input parameter to compensate the RTC and the BLE timer used during sleep mode. OSC_32K_CAL_GetPpm is called every time the ppm value of the 32 kHz source clock needs to be calculated. It takes around one second to complete (depending on how off the 32 kHz source clock is from the ideal frequency) and the application cannot enter into low power state during this time. The registered callback function is executed once the calculation is complete. The ppm calculation is performed into the DMA callback. It consists of obtaining the CTIMER counter difference and use it as f 1 in the formula shown before. The ppm values are calculated using floating point unit. /* Calculate PPMs */ ppmResult = ( float ) ( ( float ) 1 - ( ( float ) ApbClockFreq / ( float ) ApbCountDiff ) ) ; ppmResult * = ( float ) 1048576 ; ‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ Then OSC_32_CAL_ApplyPpm must be called using the ppm value obtained after calling OSC_32K_CAL_GetPpm. This API programs the necessary values in the RTCàCAL register and the BLE Sleep timer registers to compensate for the differences in the 32 kHz source clock. Finally, the user must account for all those other APIs that make use of the 32 kHz clock frequency and update the values accordingly. For the particular case of the NXP BLE Stack, there are two APIs that need to be updated to return the clock frequency after the calibration has been applied. uint32_t PWRLib_LPTMR_GetInputFrequency ( void ) { uint32_t result = 32000 ; int32_t ppm = 0 ; if ( RTC -> CTRL & RTC_CTRL_CAL_EN_MASK ) /* is calibration enabled ? */ { /* Get the current calibration value */ if ( RTC -> CAL & RTC_CAL_DIR_MASK ) { /* Backward calibration */ ppm - = ( int32_t ) ( RTC -> CAL & RTC_CAL_PPM_MASK ) ; } else { /* Forward calibration */ ppm + = ( int32_t ) ( RTC -> CAL & RTC_CAL_PPM_MASK ) ; } /* Obtain the uncalibrated clock frequency using the formula * fUncal = 32000 - (ppm*0.03125) where 0.03125 is the number * of Hz per PPM digit obtained from (768 Hz/0x6000 PPM) */ result - = ( float ) ppm * ( float ) 0.03125 ; } else { #if (defined(BOARD_XTAL1_CLK_HZ) && (BOARD_XTAL1_CLK_HZ == CLK_XTAL_32KHZ)) result = CLOCK_GetFreq ( kCLOCK_32KClk ) ; /* 32,768Khz crystal is used */ #else result = CLOCK_GetFreq ( kCLOCK_32KClk ) ; /* 32,000Khz internal RCO is used */ #endif } return result ; } ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ uint32_t StackTimer_GetInputFrequency ( void ) { uint32_t prescaller = 0 ; uint32_t refClk = 0 ; uint32_t result = 0 ; #if FSL_FEATURE_SOC_FTM_COUNT refClk = BOARD_GetFtmClock ( gStackTimerInstance_c ) ; prescaller = mFtmConfig . prescale ; result = refClk / ( 1 << prescaller ) ; #elif FSL_FEATURE_RTC_HAS_FRC int32_t ppm = 0 ; ( void ) prescaller ; /* unused variables */ ( void ) refClk ; /* suppress warnings */ result = 32000 ; if ( RTC -> CTRL & RTC_CTRL_CAL_EN_MASK ) /* is calibration enabled ? */ { /* Get the current calibration value */ if ( RTC -> CAL & RTC_CAL_DIR_MASK ) { /* Backward calibration */ ppm - = ( int32_t ) ( RTC -> CAL & RTC_CAL_PPM_MASK ) ; } else { /* Forward calibration */ ppm + = ( int32_t ) ( RTC -> CAL & RTC_CAL_PPM_MASK ) ; } /* Obtain the uncalibrated clock frequency using the formula * fUncal = 32000 - (ppm*0.03125) where 0.03125 is the number * of Hz per PPM digit obtained from (768 Hz/0x6000 PPM) */ result - = ( float ) ppm * ( float ) 0.03125 ; } else { #if (defined(BOARD_XTAL1_CLK_HZ) && (BOARD_XTAL1_CLK_HZ == CLK_XTAL_32KHZ)) result = CLOCK_GetFreq ( kCLOCK_32KClk ) ; /* 32,768Khz crystal is used */ #else result = CLOCK_GetFreq ( kCLOCK_32KClk ) ; /* 32,000Khz internal RCO is used */ #endif } #elif FSL_FEATURE_SOC_CTIMER_COUNT refClk = BOARD_GetCtimerClock ( mCtimerBase [ gStackTimerInstance_c ] ) ; prescaller = mCtimerConfig [ gStackTimerInstance_c ] . prescale ; result = refClk / ( prescaller + 1 ) ; #else refClk = BOARD_GetTpmClock ( gStackTimerInstance_c ) ; prescaller = mTpmConfig . prescale ; result = refClk / ( 1 << prescaller ) ; #endif return result ; } ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍
View full article
Customer is designing QN9090 module. They have IQxel non-signaling equipment and  ask if QN9090 can be tested with IQxel-MW . We co-work with ACE Solution Taiwan Co.Ltd . to Integrate QN9090 and IQxel to perform 1M bps, 2M bps and Frame error rate test . This document will address the QN9090 setup and IQxel c onnection setup. Fi nally we show the 1M bps, 2M bps and packet error rate results.
View full article
View the Webinar Recording
View full article
       My customer asks if QN9080 can be tested with MT887x. We co-work with Anritsu Taiwan to integrate QN9080 and MT887x to perform 1M bps, 2M bps and Frame error rate test . This document will address the QN9080 setup and MT887x c onnection setup. W e show the 1M bps , 2M bps and frame error rate results. The Anritsu  equipment is applied to MT8870, MT8872 model name.        If you would like to perform the same test environment. You may contact Anritsu to get the latest "Auto-test tool " released by Anritsu and follow their SOP document to install "Auto-test tool" into PC to perform this RF validation test. 
View full article