Programming a blank K20

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Programming a blank K20

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jt_brazil
Contributor II

Hi, everybody.

I am beginning to design an IoT platform using a KL43Z processor. As I have a KL43Z-based Freedom board, it seemed natural to use the board as the basis for the design. All Freedom boards seem an OpenSDA adapter made with a K20 processor, so I'm inclined to follow the same design. In that case, I'd use the OpenSDA adapter to program the KL43Z processor, but the question is how would I program a blank K20 before soldering to the board? I realize that OpenSDAv2 is open source, but what is the hardware required to program the blank K20?

Also, is there an alternative so that I could use only the target processor, KL43Z, and still be able to program/debug it? In that case, would I have to purchase a debugger?

I'd appreciate any thoughts and advices.

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7 Replies

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jeremyzhou
NXP TechSupport
NXP TechSupport

Hi Julio,
First of all, you needn't use the K20 to build the OpenSDA interface actually.

I'd highly recommend that you can design the debug interface by referring to the attachment.

And you even needn't to purchase any debuggers, the FRDM-KL43 is enough and you can learn how to use the FRDM-KL43 to debug other boards through the link as below.

Using the Freescale Freedom (FRDM-KL43Z) to Debug other Boards | MCU on Eclipse
Have a great day,
Ping

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jt_brazil
Contributor II

Thank you, Jeremy. Let me see if I understand what you wrote.

Suppose I design a Kinetis board without an OpenSDA adapter (the one with the K20). At the present time, I still don't know how to use the SDA debugger in that case, but I intend to study the link you recommeded tomorrow.

Then I could hack a FRDM-KL43 board to use it do debug and program my custom hardware. Am I getting this right?

Thank you very much.

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jeremyzhou
NXP TechSupport
NXP TechSupport

Hi Julio,

Bingo, you get it.
Have a great day,
Ping

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scottm
Senior Contributor II

For my Kinetis boards I use a P&E Micro Multilink Universal - I have a couple of Cyclone Pros for ColdFire and HCS08 but haven't upgraded to the Cyclone version that supports SWD.

To program it before soldering you're going to need something like the P&E Cyclone Universal (the Multilink doesn't supply power) and a ZIF socket.

I use in-circuit programming for most of my products.  If it's a development board I'll use the 10-pin Cortex debug header but otherwise I use the Tag Connect TC-2030 'plug of nails' cable with the Multilink.  The pads on the board don't take up much room and you only need SWDCLK, SWDIO, reset, ground, and optionally power.  They also have Eagle PCB library files for the connector.

Hope that helps,

Scott

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jt_brazil
Contributor II

Hi, Scott. I finally got a "go ahead" to purchase some equipment, and I'm about to buy a Multilink Universal, as you suggested. Since I'm just developing a prototype, the idea is to include a 10-pin SWD header on the board and program the microcontroller in-circuit. My question for you is: "does the Multilink universal include all that is necessary for the task, or do I need to purchase any other hardware, cables or software?". By the way, I'm using Kinetis Development Studio for design. Thank you very much.

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scottm
Senior Contributor II

Yes, it came with a small pile of various ribbon cables.  The only cable I've had to buy for it is the TC-2030 adapter, and that's just because I choose to use that connector on most of my boards.

The main drawback of the Multilink is that it doesn't supply power to the target. You'll need to make sure you have a way to power your target device during programming.

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jt_brazil
Contributor II

Thank you, Scott. I will look into your suggestions, but Jeremy's idea is closer to what I want. But your reply was very informative, anyway. Thank you again.

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