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What's the proper copyright notice for a modified file?

Question asked by Robert Poor on Oct 6, 2017
Latest reply on Oct 9, 2017 by Jing Pan

Is there a lawyer in the house?  At the risk of slipping into pedantry, what's the proper copyright notice for a modified SDK and/or Bootloader file?   Consider the following two examples.  First, with an outdated NXP notice:

 

/*
* Copyright (c) 2015-2016, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
* Copyright 2016 NXP
*
* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification,
* are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
* ...
*/

If I've modified this file, should I update the "Copyright 2016 NXP" to be "Copyright 2016-2017 NXP" (even though one of the conditions is that the "source code must retain the above copyright notice")?

 

And consider this one that lacks any mention of NXP:

/*
* Copyright (c) 2015, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
* All rights reserved.
*
* Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification,
* are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
* ...
*/

Should I add a "Copyright 2017 NXP" line following the Freescale copyright?  Should I maintain the "All rights reserved"?

 

What's more, is it appropriate for me to add my own copyright line following the NXP line?  (I'm not feeling possessive about the code, but perhaps it's inappropriate to say the code is from NXP if I've created or modified it??)

 

I'm asking all this because I've created a flash-resident bootloader v2.0 that's been updated to use the SDK 2.0 fsl_xxx driver files and would like to make it available to the community -- with the correct attributions, of course.

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