alternative os on i.MX28

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alternative os on i.MX28

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MichaelOlsen
Contributor I

Hi all,

My company have decided to use the i.MX28 in our next generation devices, and I am now faced with the challenge of porting our existing OS to the i.MX28 chip.

I have been unable to locate any examples or software packages that are not targeted to Android, Linux or Win CE.

Do any one here know where i can find such examples? or Software packages?

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Doug_EmbeddedAc
Senior Contributor I

Hi Michael,

 

The MQX platform for the i.MX28 includes MQX RTOS, a TCP/IP stack, File System, USB stacks, and several drivers. We can provide additional details on this if you wish to contact us at info@embedded-access.com 

 

Doug

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MichaelOlsen
Contributor I

Hi Iain,

Thanks for pointing out the MQX RTOS, we will look at this aproach.


Iain Galloway (Future) said:

It may be of some help: - There is an MQX RTOS port for i.MX28

Presently you have to license this through Embedded Access (EAI) though.

You may be able to evaluate it, and observe how the BSPs and RTOS are implemented.

-iain

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iafg
Contributor IV

Also - Robert metioned a good idea about porting your own code on top of an OS.

A Lower level RTOS like MQX will put you closer to the hardware, and more in control of things while still giving you the advantage of having drivers to access the peripherals.

 

Iain Galloway (Future) said:

It may be of some help: - There is an MQX RTOS port for i.MX28

Presently you have to license this through Embedded Access (EAI) though.

You may be able to evaluate it, and observe how the BSPs and RTOS are implemented.

-iain

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iafg
Contributor IV

It may be of some help: - There is an MQX RTOS port for i.MX28

Presently you have to license this through Embedded Access (EAI) though.

You may be able to evaluate it, and observe how the BSPs and RTOS are implemented.

-iain

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MichaelOlsen
Contributor I

Hi Robert,
There are a few reasons for this, first there is legacy and second there are power saving modes.

Our products can be programmed by the customers, and an application written for any other of our units must still run on the new one. For the power management we have a power mode, where the cpu goes into standby and waits for an interrupt. Where all that is not required for resuming operation is turned off.

While we can achive most of this by running in Linux userspace, we really want to be able to control the power consumption.

Luckily i was not involved the last time we had to switch cpu :-), and this time we 'only' change the ARM generation.
Robert Schwebel said:

Hi Michael,

Can you elaborate why you want to use your "own" operating system? Porting operating systems is a hard task, so if it is not absolutely necessary, almost everyone usually tries to avoid it :-)

Note that you can, for example, port your own code on top of Linux userspace.

Robert

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RobertSchwebel
Contributor IV

Hi Michael,

Can you elaborate why you want to use your "own" operating system? Porting operating systems is a hard task, so if it is not absolutely necessary, almost everyone usually tries to avoid it :-)

Note that you can, for example, port your own code on top of Linux userspace.

Robert

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