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This note show how to use the open source gstreamer1.0-rtsp-server package on i.MX6QDS and i.MX8x to stream video files and camera using RTP protocol.  The i.MX 6ULL and i.MX 7 doesn't have Video Processing Unit (VPU). Real Time protocol is a very common network protocol for delivering media over IP networks. On the board, you will need a GStreamer pipeline that encodes the raw video, adds the RTP payload, and sends over a network sink. A generic pipeline would look as follows: video source ! video encoder ! RTP payload ! network sink Video source: often it is a camera, but it can be a video from a file or a test pattern, for example. Video encoder: a video encoder as H.264, H.265, VP8, JPEG and others. RTP payload: an RTP payload that matches the video encoder. Network sink: a video sync that streams over the network, often via UDP.   Prerequisites: MX6x o MX8x board with the L5.10.35 BSP installed. A host PC with either Gstreamer or VLC player installed. Receiving h.264/h.265 Encoded RTP Video Stream on a Host Machine Using GStreamer GStreamer is a low-latency method for receiving RTP video. On your host machine, install Gstreamer and send the following command: $ gst-launch-1.0 -v udpsrc port=5000 caps = "application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96" ! rtph264depay ! decodebin ! videoconvert ! autovideosink sync=false   Using Host PC: VLC Player Optionally, you can use VLC player to receive RTP video on a PC. First, in your PC, create a sdp file with the following content:  stream.sdpv=0m=video 5000 RTP/AVP 96c=IN IP4 127.0.0.1a=rtpmap:96 H264/90000 After this, with the GStreamer pipepline on the device running, open this .sdp file with VLC Player on the host PC. Sending h.264 and h.265 Encoded RTP Video Stream GStreamer provides an h.264 encoding element by software named x264enc. Use this plugin if your board does not support h.264 encoding by hardware or if you want to use the same pipeline on different modules. Note that the video performance will be lower compared with the plugins with encoding accelerated by hardware. # gst-launch-1.0 videotestsrc ! videoconvert ! x264enc ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! udpsink host=<host-machine-ip> port=5000 Note: Replace <host-machine-ip> by the IP of the host machine. In all examples you can replace videotestsrc by v4l2src element to collect a stream from a camera   i.MX8X # gst-launch-1.0 videotestsrc ! videoconvert ! v4l2h264enc ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! udpsink host=<host-machine-ip> port=5000   i.MX 8M Mini Quad/ 8M Plus # gst-launch-1.0 videotestsrc ! videoconvert ! vpuenc_h264 ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! udpsink host=<host-machine-ip> port=5000 i.MX6X The i.MX6QDS does not support h.265 so the h.264 can work: # gst-launch-1.0 videotestsrc ! videoconvert ! vpuenc_h264 ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! udpsink host=<host-machine-ip> port=5000   Using Other Video Encoders While examples of streaming video with other encoders are not provided, you may try it yourself. Use the gst-inspect tool to find available encoders and RTP payloaders on the board: # gst-inspect-1.0 | grep -e "encoder"# gst-inspect-1.0 | grep -e "rtp" -e " payloader" Then browse the results and replace the elements in the original pipelines. On the receiving end, you will have to use a corresponding payload. Inspect the payloader element to find the corresponding values. For example: # gst-inspect-1.0 rtph264pay   Install rtp in your yocto different form L5.10.35 BSP, to install gstreamer1.0-rtsp-server in any Yocto Project image, please follow the steps below: Enable meta-multimedia layer: Add the following on your build/conf/bblayers.conf: BBLAYERS += "$"${BSPDIR}/sources/meta-openembedded/meta-multimedia" Include gstreamer1.0-rtsp-server into the image: Add the following on your build/conf/local.conf: IMAGE_INSTALL_append += "gstreamer1.0-rtsp-server" Run bitbake and mount your sdcard. Copy the binaries: Access the gstreamer1.0-rtsp-server examples folder: $ cd /build/tmp/work/cortexa9hf-vfp-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi/gstreamer1.0-rtsp-server/$version/build/examples/.libs Copy the test-uri and test-launch to the rootfs /usr/bin folder. $ sudo cp test-uri test-launch /media/USER/ROOTFS_PATH/usr/bin Be sure that the IPs are correctly set: SERVER: => ifconfig eth0 $SERVERIP CLIENT: => ifconfig eth0 $CLIENTIP Video file example SERVER: => test-uri file:///home/root/video_file.mp4 CLIENT: => gst-launch-1.0 playbin uri=rtsp://$SERVERIP:8554/test You can try to improve the framerate performance using manual pipelines in the CLIENT with the rtspsrc plugin instead of playbin. Follow an example: => gst-launch-1.0 rtspsrc location=rtsp://$SERVERIP:8554/test caps = 'application/x-rtp'  ! queue max-size-buffers=0 ! rtpjitterbuffer latency=100 ! queue max-size-buffers=0 ! rtph264depay ! queue max-size-buffers=0 ! decodebin ! queue max-size-buffers=0 ! imxv4l2sink sync=false   Camera example SERVER: => test-launch "( imxv4l2src device=/dev/video0 ! capsfilter caps='video/x-raw, width=1280, height=720, framerate=30/1, mapping=/test' ! vpuenc_h264 ! rtph264pay name=pay0 pt=96 )" CLIENT: => gst-launch-1.0 rtspsrc location=rtsp://$SERVERIP:8554/test ! decodebin ! autovideosink sync=false The rtspsrc has two properties very useful for RTSP streaming: Latency: Useful for low-latency RTSP stream playback (default 200 ms); Buffer-mode: Used to control buffer mode. The slave mode is recommended for low-latency communications. Using these properties, the example below gets 29 FPS without a sync=false property in the sink plugin. The key achievement here is the fact that there is no dropped frame: => gst-launch-1.0 rtspsrc location=rtsp://$SERVERIP:8554/test latency=100 buffer-mode=slave ! queue max-size-buffers=0 ! rtph264depay ! vpudec ! imxv4l2sink      
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Multicore programming guide with Linux 3.14.52_1.1.0 and FreeRTOS BSP for i.MX 6SoloX
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response.   This is a detailed programming aid for the registers associated with MMDC initialization. The last sheet formats the register settings for use with ARM RealView ICE. It can also be used with the windows executable for the DDR Stress Test. This programming aid was used for internal NXP validation boards.
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We will build a remote debug environmet of Qt Creator in this user guide.   Contents 1 Change local.conf file in Yocto 2 2 Build and deploy Yocto SDK 2 2.1 Build full image SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.2 Deploy SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Configure QT Kit 2 3.1 Setup device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.2 Configure QT version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.3 Configure gcc and g++ manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.4 Configure gdb manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.5 Configure Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.6 Very important thing!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4 Test result
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  Question: How can we generate an ARM DS5 DStream format DDR initialization script using the DRAM Register Programming Aid?  Answer: Some RPAs include a  "DStream .ds file" tab for the ARM DS5 debugger specific commands. The i.MX6UL/ULL/ULZ DRAM Register Programming Aids for example already has this supported. However, the user can easily create  the .ds format from the existing .inc format. The basic steps to convert .inc files to .ds format are as follows: 1)  Replace the one instance of setmem /16 with mem set 2)  In that same line, replace 0x020bc000 = with 0x020bc000 16 3)  Use a Replace All command to change setmem /32 with mem set 4)  Use a Replace All command to change = with 32 5)  Use a Replace All command to change // with # 6)  Save as a .ds file.   Question: When using a 528MHz DRAM Controller interface with a DDR memory of a faster speed bin, which speed bin timing options should one use? Answer: For example, let’s assume our MX6DQ design is using a DDR3 memory from a DDR3-1600 speed bin.  However, the maximum speed of the MMDC interface for the MX6DQ using DDR3 is 528MHz.  Should we use the 1600 speed bin (800MHz clock speed) or the 1066 speed bin (533MHz clock speed)?  In short, the user should use the timings rated for the maximum speed (frequency) with which you are running, in this case DDR3-1066 (533MHz).  In some cases, like when using the MX6DL, the maximum DDR frequency is 400MHz.  In this case, you would want to try and use 800 timings found in the AC timing parameters table.  However, most DDR3 devices have speed bin tables that may go only as low as 1066, in which case you would use the closest speed bin to your operational frequency (i.e. the 1066 speed bin table).     Question: Some timing parameters may specify a min and max number, which should I use? Answer: In most cases, you will want to choose the minimum timings.  Some DRAM controllers may have a tRAS_MAX timing parameter, in which case you would obviously use the maximum tRAS parameter given in the DRAM data sheet. Also, for timing parameters tAONPD and tAOFPD, we also want to use the maximum values given in the DDR3 data sheet. These represent the maximum amount of time the DDR3 device takes to turn on or off the RTT (termination), therefore, we should wait at least this amount of time before issuing any commands or accesses.   Question: Some timing parameters state things like “Greater of 3CK or 7.5ns”; which should I use? Answer: This depends on your clock speed.  Say you are running at 533MHz.  At 533MHz, 7.5ns equates to 4CKs.  In this case, 7.5ns at 533MHz is GREATER than 3CK, so we would use the 7.5ns number, or 4CKs. At 400MHz, 7.5ns equates to 3CKs.  In this case, we’d simply use 3CKs.   Question: I have a design that will throttle the DDR frequency (dynamic frequency scaling).  At full speed, I plan to run at 533MHz, and then I plan to throttle down to say 400MHz whenever possible.  Do I need to re-calculate my 400 MHz timing parameters that were initially set for 533MHz? Answer: It is not necessary to re-calculate timing parameters for 400MHz, and you can re-use the ones for 533MHz.  The timings at 533 MHz are much tighter than 400 MHz, and the key here is to NOT violate timings.  Also, it may be a bit of a hassle maintaining two sets of timing parameters, especially if later in the design, you swap DDR vendors that might require you to re-calculate some timing parameters.  It’s easier to do it once and to come up with a combined worse-case timing parameters for 533MHz, which you know will work at 400MHz.  But, if you don’t mind maintaining two sets of timing parameters, and really want to optimize timings down to the last pico-second for 400MHz, then knock yourself out.   Question: Can I use these Register programming aids for both Fly by and T- Topology ? Answer Yes The DDR register programming aid is agnostic to the DDR layout. The same spreadsheet works for both topologies. We recommend running write leveling calibration for both topologies and the values returned by the Write Leveling routine from the Freescale DDR stress test should be incorporated back to the customer specific initialization script. The DDR stress test also has a feature whereby it evaluates the write leveling values returned from calibration and increments WALAT to 1 if the values exceed a defined limit. The DDR stress test informs the user when the Write Additional latency (WALAT) exceeds the limit and should be increased by 1, and reminds the user to add it back in the customer specific initialization script if required.   WALAT - 0 00000000 WALAT: Write Additional latency. Recommend to clear these bits. Proper board design should ensure that the DDR3 devices are placed close enough to the MMDC to ensure the skew between CLK and DQS is less than 1 cycle.     Question: Can I use the DEFAULT Register programming aid values for MDOR when using an Internal OSC instead of the recommended 32.768 KHZ XTAL ? Answer No, NXP recommends reprogramming these values based on the worse case frequency (Max clock) of the internal OSC of the device to guarantee JEDEC timings are met. Please refer to  Internal Oscillator Accuracy considerations for the i.MX 6 Series for more details  
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Important: If you have any questions or would like to report any issues with the DDR tools or supporting documents please create a support ticket in the i.MX community. Please note that any private messages or direct emails are not monitored and will not receive a response. i.MX 6/7 Series Family DDR Tools Overview This page contains the latest releases for the i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools. The tools described on this page cover the following i.MX 6/7 series SoCs: i.MX 6DQP (Dual/Quad Plus) i.MX 6DQ (Dual/Quad) i.MX 6DL/S (Dual Lite/Solo) i.MX 6SoloX i.MX 6SL i.MX 6SLL i.MX 6UL i.MX 6ULL/ULZ i.MX 7D/S i.MX 7ULP The purpose of the i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools is to enable users to generate and test a custom DRAM initialization based on their device configuration (density, number of chip selects, etc.) and board layout (data bus bit swizzling, etc.). This process equips the user to then proceed with the bring-up of a boot loader and an OS. Once the OS is brought up, it is recommended to run an OS-based memory test (like Linux memtester) to further verify and test the DDR memory interface. The i.MX 6/7 series DDR Tools consist of: DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) DDR Stress test _________________________________________________________ i.MX 6/7 Series DDR Stress Test The i.MX 6/7 Series DDR stress test tool is a Windows-based software tool that is used as a mechanism to verify that the DDR initialization is operational prior for use in u-boot and OS bring-up. The DDR Stress Test tool can be found here: i.MX 6/7 DDR Stress Test Tool Note that the DDR Stress test tool supports all of the above i.MX SoCs, however, some of the supported i.MX SoCs named in the tool support multiple i.MX SoCs as follows: MX6DQ – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6DQ and i.MX 6DQP (Plus) MX6DL – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6DL and i.MX 6S (i.MX 6DLS family) MX6ULL – when selected, this supports both i.MX 6ULL and i.MX6 ULZ MX7D – when selected, this supports both i.MX 7D and i.MX 7S _____________________________________________________________________________ i.MX 6/7 Series DDR Register Programming Aid (RPA) The i.MX 6/7 series DDR RPA (or simply RPA) is an Excel spreadsheet tool used to develop DDR initialization for a user’s specific DDR configuration (DDR device type, density, etc.). The RPA generates the DDR initialization script for use with the DDR Stress Test tool. For a history of the previous versions of an RPA, refer to the Revision History tab of the respective RPA. To obtain the latest RPAs, please refer to the following links: i.MX 6DQP i.MX6DQP Register Programming Aids i.MX 6DQ i.MX6DQ Register Programming Aids i.MX 6DL/S i.MX6DL Register Programming Aids i.MX 6SoloX i.MX6SX Register Programming Aids i.MX 6SL i.MX6SL Register Programming Aids  i.MX6SLL i.MX6SLL Register Programming Aids i.MX 6UL/ULL/ULZ i.MX6UL/ULL/ULZ DRAM Register Programming Aids i.MX7D i.MX7D DRAM Register Programming Aids i.MX 7ULP i.MX7ULP DRAM Register Programming Aids _____________________________________________________________________________ DRAM Register Programming Aids FAQ    
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      The i.MX6UL/LL/LZ processor supports 2 USB OTG interfaces, USB OTG1 and USB OTG2, and each USB interface can be configured as a device, host or dual role mode. On the EVK board of i.MX6UL/LL, USB OTG1 is designed as dual role mode, and USB OTG2 is designed as HOST mode. This is sufficient for most customers.       However, in actual applications, we may need 2 USB HOSTs, and at the same time, we don’t want to use MicroUSB to USB TYPE-AF cable for Host-Device mode conversion. Therefore, the design of the USB circuit needs to meet such requirements: 1. USB device mode We need a USB device to download the linux image to the flash or SD card on the board. 2. 2 USB HOSTs When the system is working normally, we need the board to support 2 USB HOST. i.MX6UL/LL/LZ has only 2 USB ports. How to design to meet this requirement without increasing the USB HUB? The following scheme is used as a reference, and I hope it will be helpful to customers with similar requirement:        The logic and application description of this Diagram: : Default—device mode In the process of debugging the software, we need to use the USB OTG interface to download the linux image, so it must work in device mode. What we need to do is: (1). Pull USB OTG ID up to 3.3V (2). The USB OTG D+/D- signal is switched to the MicroUSB connector. (3). The USB OTG VBUS is provided with 5V power from the external PC USB HOST. Usage:        -Use a jumper for Pin 1 and Pin2, USB OTG ID pin will be pulled up to High.        With the operation, SEL pin of USB Muxer is High, and USB signals are switched to port B, and USB differential signals are connected to MicroUSB connector. At the same time, MIC2026-1YM output is disabled. The USB OTG1 VBUS pin of CPU is supplied by VBUS of MicroUSB connector, that is to say, supplied by PC USB HOST.        In this mode, software engineer can use it to download images to flash on board. Normal Work—Host mode After the software debugging is completed, two HOSTs are needed on the board. At this time, we need to switch the USB OTG1 from device to HOST mode. What we need to do is: (1). Pull USB OTG1 ID down to LOW (2). The USB OTG D+/D- signal is switched to the USB Type-AF connector. (3). Board should supply 5V power for USB device connected USB Type-AF connector. Usage:        -Use a jumper for Pin 2 and Pin3, USB OTG ID pin will be pulled down to Low.        With the operation, USB OTG1 ID pin is pulled down to Low, SEL pin of USB Muxer is also LOW, USB signals are switched to Port A, and connected to USB type-AF connector. At the same time, MIC2026-1YM is enabled , OUTA will output 5V , which will supply USB device connected on USB type-AF connector.   [Note] Users need to pay attention to. When using the jumper with PIN1/2/3, the board needs to be powered off. In other words, when switching between device and host, you need to switch off the power, then power on, and restart the board. The solution can also be used for i.MX processors with USB 2.0 interface.   NXP CAS team Wedong Sun 01/15/2021
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Recently, some customers are using i.MX processor, they want to add raid & LVM function support to the kernel, but they have encountered the problem that the compilation cannot pass. Tested it in L4.14.98, L4.19.35 & L5.4.x, Only L4.14.98 bsp exists the problem. Here are the experimental steps I have done, including the same problems I encountered with the customer, and how to modify the kernel to ensure that the compilation passes. 1. Exporting cross compilation tool chain from yocto BSP (1) Downloading Yocto BSP and compiling it. Following steps in i.MX_Yocto_Project_User's_Guide.pdf, download Yocto BSP and compile it successfully. (2) Exporting cross compilation tool chain Following methods described in i.MX_Linux_User's_Guide.pdf, export cross compilation tool chain from yocto BSP. See Chapter 4.5.12 of the document, please! Then cross compilation tool chain will be like below: (3) Copying linux BSP source code to a new directory # cd ~ # mkdir L4.14.98-2.0.0 # cd L4.14.98-2.0.0 # cp -r ~/imx-yocto-bsp/build-fb/tmp/work/imx6qsabresd-poky-linux-gnueabi/linux-imx/4.14.98- r0/git ./ Then all linux source code has been copied to L4.14.98-2.0.0, which is the top directory of linux kernel source code, I will compile kernel image here. 2. Compiling linux kernel # cd ~/L4.14.98-2.0.0 # source /opt/fsl-imx-fb/4.14-sumo/environment-setup-cortexa9hf-neon-poky-linux-gnueabi # export ARCH=arm # make imx_v7_defconfig # make menuconfig Then we will add RAID and LVM modules to linux kernel. In order to reproduce errors, I added all related modules to kernel. See below, please! Device drivers---->Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM) After save and exit, began to compile kernel. # make (make –j4) The following errors will occur: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- drivers/md/dm-rq.c: In function ‘dm_old_init_request_queue’: drivers/md/dm-rq.c:716:2: error: implicit declaration of function ‘elv_register_queue’; did you mean ‘blk_register_queue’? [-Werror=implicit-function-declaration] elv_register_queue(md->queue); ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ blk_register_queue cc1: some warnings being treated as errors scripts/Makefile.build:326: recipe for target 'drivers/md/dm-rq.o' failed make[2]: *** [drivers/md/dm-rq.o] Error 1 scripts/Makefile.build:585: recipe for target 'drivers/md' failed make[1]: *** [drivers/md] Error 2 Makefile:1039: recipe for target 'drivers' failed make: *** [drivers] Error 2 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3. Finding out root cause and solving it (1) elv_register_queue( ) function The function is loaded in dm-rq.c : int dm_old_init_request_queue(struct mapped_device *md, struct dm_table *t) { … … elv_register_queue(md->queue); … … } BUT compiler didn’t find it’s declaration and entity. Searching source code, and found it declared in linux_top/block/blk.h: … … int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q); … … It’s entity is in linux_top/block/elevator.c: int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q) { … … } (2) Adding declaration and exporting the function --- Declaration Add the line below to dm-rq.c: … … extern int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q); … … --- Exporting the function(elevator.c) Add EXPORT_SYMBOL(elv_register_queue); to the end of function, see below. int elv_register_queue(struct request_queue *q) { … … } EXPORT_SYMBOL(elv_register_queue); 4. Re-compiling Linux Kernel The above error will not occur and the compilation will complete successfully.   NXP CAS team Weidong Sun
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Host TFTP and NFS Configuration Now configure the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server and Networked File System (NFS) server. U-Boot will download the Linux kernel and dtb file using tftp and then the kernel will mount (via NFS) its root file system on the computer hard drive. 1. TFTP Setup   1.1.1 Prepare the TFTP Service   Get the required software if not already set up. On host for TFTP: Install TFTP on Host $ sudo apt-get install tftpd-hpa   (Note: There are a number of examples in various forums, etc, of how to automatically start the TFTP service - but not all are successful on all Linux distro's it seems! The following may work for you.)   Start the tftpd-hpa service automatically by adding a command to /etc/rc.local. $ vi /etc/rc.local   Now, just before the exit 0 line edit below command then Save and Exit. $  service tftpd-hpa start   Now, To control the TFTP service from the command line use: $  service tftpd-hpa restart     To check the status of the TFTP service from the command line use: $  service tftpd-hpa status   1.1.1 Setup the TFTP Directories Now, we have to create the directory which will contain the kernel image and the device tree blob file. $  mkdir -p /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp Then, copy the kernel image and the device tree blob file in this directory. $ cp {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET}/zImage /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp $ cp {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET}/<dtb file> /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp   OR we can use the default directory created by yocto {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET}/ The tftpd-hpa service looks for requested files under /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp The default tftpd-hpa directory may vary with distribution/release, but it is specified in the configuration file: /etc/default/tfptd-hpa . We have to change this default directory with our directory   Edit default tftp directory $ vi /etc/default/tftpd-hpa   Now, change the directory defined as TFTP_DIRECTORY with your host system directory which contains kernel and device tree blob file. Using created directory TFTP_DIRECTORY=” /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp ” OR Using Yocto directory path TFTP_DIRECTORY=” {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET} ” Restart the TFTP service if required $  service tftpd-hpa  restart   1.2 NFS Setup 1.2.1 Prepare the NFS Service Get the required software if not already set up. On host for NFS: Install NFS on Host $  sudo  apt-get install nfs-kernel-server The NFS service starts automatically. To control NFS services : $  service nfs-kernel-server restart To check the status of the NFS service from the command line : $  service nfs-k ernel-server status 1.2.2 Setup the NFS Directories Now, we have to create the directory which will contain the root file system. $  mkdir -p / imx -boot/imx6q-sabre/ nfs   Then, copy the rootfs in this directory. $  cp -R {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs/* /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs   OR we can use the default directory created by yocto. $  {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs 1.2.3 Update NFS Export File The NFS server requires /etc/exports to be configured correctly to access NFS filesystem directory to specific hosts. $ vi /etc/exports Then, edit below line into the opened file. <”YOUR NFS DIRECTORY”> <YOUR BOARD IP>( rw ,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) Ex. If you created custom directory for NFS then, /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs <YOUR BOARD IP>(rw,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) Ex:  /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs 192.168.*.*(rw,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) OR /{YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs <YOUR BOARD IP>(rw,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check)   Now, we need to restart the NFS service. $  service nfs-kernel-server restart   2 Target Setup   We need to set up the network IP address of our target. Power On the board and hit a key to stop the U-Boot from continuing. Set the below parameters, setenv serverip 192.168.0.206        //This must be your Host IP address The path where the rootfs is placed in our host has to be indicated in the U-Boot, Ex. // if you choose default folder created by YOCTO setenv nfsroot /{YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs   OR // if you create custom directory for NFS setenv nfsroot /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs Now, we have to set kernel image name and device tree blob file name in the u-boot, setenv image < zImage name > setenv fdt_file <dtb file name on host> Now, set the bootargs for the kernel boot, setenv netargs 'setenv bootargs console=${console},${baudrate} ${smp} root=/dev/nfs ip=dhcp nfsroot=${serverip}:${nfsroot},v3,tcp' Use   printenv   command and check  loadaddr and  fdt_addr environment variables variables for I.MX6Q SABRE, loadaddr=0x12000000 fdt_addr=0x18000000   Also, check netboot environment variable. It should be like below, netboot=echo Booting from net ...; run netargs; if test ${ip_dyn} = yes; then setenv get_cmd dhcp; else setenv get_cmd tftp; fi; ${get_cmd} ${image}; if test ${boot_fdt} = yes || test ${boot_fdt} = try; then if ${get_cmd} ${fdt_addr} ${fdt_file}; then bootz ${loadaddr} - ${fdt_addr}; else if test ${boot_fdt} = try; then bootz; else echo WARN: Cannot load the DT; fi; fi; else bootz; fi; Now, set environment variable bootcmd to boot every time from the network, setenv bootcmd run netboot Now finally save those variable in u-boot: saveenv Reset your board; it should now boot from the network: U-Boot 2016.03-imx_v2016.03_4.1.15_2.0.0_ga+ga57b13b (Apr 17 2018 - 17:13:43 +0530)  (..) Net:   FEC [PRIME] Normal Boot Hit any key to stop autoboot:  0   Booting from net ... Using FEC device TFTP from server 192.168.0.206; our IP address is 192.168.3.101 Filename 'zImage'. Load address: 0x12000000 Loading: #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         ###########################################################         2.1 MiB/s done Bytes transferred = 6578216 (646028 hex) Using FEC device TFTP from server 192.168.0.206; our IP address is 192.168.3.101 Filename 'imx6q-sabresd.dtb'. Load address: 0x18000000 Loading: ####         1.8 MiB/s done Bytes transferred = 45893 (b345 hex) Kernel image @ 0x12000000 [ 0x000000 - 0x646028 ] ## Flattened Device Tree blob at 18000000   Booting using the fdt blob at 0x18000000   Using Device Tree in place at 18000000, end 1800e344 switch to ldo_bypass mode!   Starting kernel ...
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meta-avs-demos Yocto layer meta-avs-demos   is a Yocto meta layer (complementary to the NXP BSP release for i.MX) published on CodeAurora that includes the additional required packages to support  Amazon's Alexa Voice Services SDK (AVS_SDK) applications. The build procedure is the described on the README.md of the corresponding branch. We have 2 fuctional branches now: imx-alexa-sdk: Support for Morty based i.mx releases imx7d-pico-avs-sdk_4.1.15-1.0.0: legacy support for Jethro releases The master branch is only used to collect manifest files, that used with repo init/sync commands will fetch the whole environment for the 2 special supported boards: i.MX7D Pico Pi and i.MX8M EVK. However the meta-avs-demos can be used with any i.MX board either. Recipes to include Amazon's Alexa Voice Services in your applications. The meta-avs-demos provides the required recipes to build an i.MX image with the support for running Alexa SDK. The imx-alexa-sdk branch is based on Morty and kernel 4.9.X and it supports the next builds: i.MX7D Pico P i i.MX8M EVK Generic i.MX board For the i.MX7D Pico Pi and i.MX8M EVK there is an extended support for additional (external) Sound Cards like: TechNexion VoiceHat: 2Mic Array board with DSPConcepts SW support Synaptics Card: 2 Mic with Sensory WakeWord support The Generic i.MX is for any other regular i.MX board supported on the official NXP BSP releases. Only the default soundcard (embedded) on the board is supported. Sensory wakeword is currently only enabled for those with ARMV7 architecture. To support any external board like the VoiceHat or Synaptics is up to the user to include the additional patches/changes required. Build Instructions Follow the corresponding README file to follow the steps to build an image with Alexa SDK support README-IMX7D-PICOPI.md README-IMX8M-EVK.md README-IMX-GENERIC.md
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[中文翻译版] 见附件   原文链接: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343372 
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The i.MX Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 release is now available on Web Site (i.MX6 BSP Updates and Releases -> Android).   Files available: # Name Description 1 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_docs.tar.gz i.MX Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP Documentation 2 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_source.tar.gz Source Code of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP (4.1 kernel) for i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6DualPlus, i.MX 6Dual, i.MX 6DualLite, i.MX 6Solo  i.MX 6Sololite, i.MX6SX and i.MX7D 3 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_image_6dqpsabreauto.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE for Automotive Infotainment based on i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, and i.MX 6DualLite 4 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_image_6dqpsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE Platform and SABRE Board based on i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad and i.MX 6DualLite. 5 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_image_6slevk.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP - i.MX 6Sololite evaluation kit. 6 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_image_6sxsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE Board based on i.MX 6SoloX 7 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_image_6sxsabreauto.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE for Automotive infotainment based on i.MX 6SoloX 8 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_image_7dsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.1_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE Board based on i.MX 7Dual 9 android_N7.1.1_1.0.0_tools.tar.gz Manufacturing Toolkit and VivanteVTK for N7.1.1_1.0.0   Supported Hardware SoC/Boards: MX 6Quad, i.MX 6QuadPlus, and i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-SD board and platform MX 6Quad, i.MX 6QuadPlus, and i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-AI board and platform MX 6SoloLite EVK platform MX 6SoloX SABRE-SD board and platforms MX 6SoloX SABRE-AI board and platforms MX 7Dual SABRE-SD board and platform   Changes: Compared to the M6.0.1_2.1.0 release, this release has the following major changes: Upgraded the Android platform version to Android 7.1. Upgraded the U-Boot and Linux Kernel Code base from the L4.1.15_1.0.0 release to the L4.1.15_1.2.0-ga release. Added support for the i.MX 7Dual SABRE-SD board. Upgraded the GPU driver from 5.0.11p8 to 6.2.0.p2.   Feature: For features please consult the release notes.   Known issues For known issues and more details please consult the Release Notes.
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i.MX evaluation board can be a simple solution to program i.MX boards in a factory for instance. i.MX evaluation board are not for industrial usage, but you can find plenty of cheap i.MX insdustrial boards on the web. Here I am using an i.MX8QXP rev B0 MEK board and I will program an i.MX6Q SABRE SD board. The first step is to generate your image. Follow the documentation steps to generate the "validation" image. You will have to customize a little bit the local.conf file (in conf/local.conf) to have git, cmake, gcc and other missing package. edit local.conf and add the following lines at the end of the file: IMAGE_INSTALL_append = " git cmake htop packagegroup-core-buildessential xz p7zip rsync" ‍‍‍‍ ‍ I have added rsync package in local, it can replace cp (copy) but with the --progress option you can see the copy progression. P7zip replace unzip for our images archives avaialable on nxp.com as unzip as issues with big files. then rebake your image: bitbake - k fsl - image - validation - imx‍‍‍‍ ‍ When it is done, go in tmp/deploy/image/<your image generated> and use uuu to program your board (I use a sd card; thus I can increase the partition esily): sudo . / uuu - b sd_all imx - boot - imx8qxpmek - sd . bin - flash fsl - image - validation - imx - imx8qxpmek . sdcard . bz2 / * ‍‍‍‍ ‍ As the rootfs can be too small, use gparted under Linux for instance to increase the size of the partition. Put the SD card and start your board. Here here the dirty part... You may know archlinux|ARM websitesite (Arch Linux ARM ), you have a lots of precompiled packages. Thus on the board you can download it, and copy the file in /usr folder (you can use it to have the latest openSSL for  instance!). Plug an ethernet cable on the board and check if it is up: ifconfig - a ifconfig eth0 up‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ Now you should have access to the internet. On uuu webpage you can find all the packages you need (here I am using a 4.14.98_2.0.0 Linux): mkdir missinglibs cd missinglibs wget http : / / mirror . archlinuxarm . org / aarch64 / core / bzip2 -1.0 . 8 - 2 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz wget http : / / mirror . archlinuxarm . org / aarch64 / core / nettle -3.5 . 1 - 1 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz wget http : / / mirror . archlinuxarm . org / aarch64 / core / libusb -1.0 . 22 - 1 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz wget http : / / mirror . archlinuxarm . org / aarch64 / extra / libzip -1.5 . 2 - 2 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz wget http : / / mirror . archlinuxarm . org / aarch64 / core / zlib -1 : 1.2 . 11 - 3 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz wget http : / / mirror . archlinuxarm . org / aarch64 / extra / p7zip -16.02 - 5 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz cd . . ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ Wait all the archives are downloaded (otherwise you'll decompress before the archive is downloaded) as wget is running in background! Now untar the archives and copy it in the rootfs (dirty): tar - xJf libzip -1.5 . 2 - 2 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz tar - xJf libusb -1.0 . 22 - 1 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz tar - xJf nettle -3.5 . 1 - 1 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz tar - xJf bzip2 -1.0 . 8 - 2 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz cp zlib -1 : 1.2 . 11 - 3 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz zlib tar - xJf zlib tar - xJf p7zip -16.02 - 5 - aarch64 . pkg . tar . xz cd usr sudo cp - R . / usr cd . . / . . / ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ Download and compile uuu: git clone git : / / github . com / NXPmicro / mfgtools . git cd mfgtools / cmake . make‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ Download an image on nxp.com for instance. I have downloaded on the i.MX6 4.14.98_2.0.0 image and put it on a usb key. then unzip it in the uuu folder: 7z e L4 .14 . 98_2 .0 . 0_ga_images_MX6QPDLSOLOX . zip‍‍‍ ‍ As mentionned before unzip cannot hadle big files... so use 7z as me plug the i.MX6Q SABRE SD to the i.MX8X and program your i.MX6 board: . / uuu uuu . auto - imx6qsabresd‍ uuu ( Universal Update Utility ) for nxp imx chips -- libuuu_1 .3 . 74 - 0 - g64eeca1 Success 1 Failure 0 ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍
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This document explains how to bring-up u-boot & Linux via JTAG This procedure has been tested on: i.MX6 Solo X Sabre SD i.MX6UL EVK Prerequistes: Get the latest BSP for your board. This procedure was tested with L4.1.15. Build the 'core-image-minimal' image to bring-up your board (Detailed steps here) Optional- Build a meta-toolchain for your device 1.- Set board to boot from Serial dowloader mode or set it to boot from the SD card and remove the sd card We basically want the board to stall in boot ROM to attach to the target. 2.- Connect JTAG probe and turn on the board The device should stall trying to establish a connection to download an image, this will allow us to attach to the target. 3.- Load Device Configuration Data In 'normal' boot sequence the boot ROM takes care of reading the DCD and configuring the device accordingly, but in this case we are skipping this sequence and we need to configure the device manually. The script used by Lauterbach to parse and configure the device is called dcd_interpreter.cmm and can be found here. Search for the package for your specific device. The DCD configuration for your board should be on your u-boot directory: yocto_build_dir/tmp/work/<your board>imx6ulevk/u-boot-imx/<u-boot_version>2016.03-r0/git under board/freescale/<name of your board>mx6ul_14x14_evk/imximage.cfg This file (imximage.cfg) contains all the data to bring up DRAM among other early configuration options. 4.- Load U-boot If an SREC file of U-boot is not present build it (meta-toolchain installed required) the SREC file contains all the information required by the probe to load it and makes this process easier. To build the SREC simply type: make <your board defconfig>mx6ul_14x14_evk_defconfig  (all supported boards are found under u-boot_dir/configs) make If you cannot build an SREC or do not want to, you can use the u-boot.imx (located under yocto_build_dir/tmp/deploy/images/<your board name>/) or u-boot.bin files but you will need to figure out the start address and load address for these files, this can be done by examining the IVT on u-boot.imx (here is a useful document explaining the structure of the IVT). Let U-boot run and you should see its output on the console I will try to boot from several sources but it will fail and show you the prompt. 5.- Create RAMDisk After building the core-image-minimal you will have all the required files under yocto_build_dir/tmp/deploy/images/<your board name>/ You will need: zImage.bin - zImage--<Linux Version>--<your board>.bin Device tree blob - zImage--<Linux Version>--<your board>.dtb Root file system - core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4 We need to create a RAMDisk out of the root file system we now have, these are the steps to do so: Compress current Root file system using gzip: gzip core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4 If you want to keep the original file use: gzip -c core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4 > core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4.gz Create RAMDisk using mkimage: mkimage -A arm -O linux -T ramdisk -C gzip -n core-image-minimal -d core-image-minimal-<your board>.rootfs.ext4.gz core-image-minimal-RAMDISK.rootfs.ext4.gz.u-boot Output: Image Name: core-image-minimal Created: Tue May 23 11:28:55 2017 Image Type: ARM Linux RAMDisk Image (gzip compressed) Data Size: 3017939 Bytes = 2947.21 kB = 2.88 MB Load Address: 00000000 Entry Point: 00000000 Here are some details on mkimage usage Usage: mkimage -l image -l ==> list image header information mkimage [-x] -A arch -O os -T type -C comp -a addr -e ep -n name -d data_file[:data_file...] image -A ==> set architecture to 'arch' -O ==> set operating system to 'os' -T ==> set image type to 'type' -C ==> set compression type 'comp' -a ==> set load address to 'addr' (hex) -e ==> set entry point to 'ep' (hex) -n ==> set image name to 'name' -d ==> use image data from 'datafile' -x ==> set XIP (execute in place) mkimage [-D dtc_options] [-f fit-image.its|-F] fit-image -D => set options for device tree compiler -f => input filename for FIT source Signing / verified boot not supported (CONFIG_FIT_SIGNATURE undefined) mkimage -V ==> print version information and exit 6.- Modify U-boot's environment variables Now we need to modify U-boot's bootargs as follows: setenv bootargs console=${console},${baudrate} root=/dev/ram rw We need to find out the addresses where u-boot will expect the zImage, the device tree and the initial RAMDisk, we can do it as follows: => printenv fdt_addr fdt_addr=0x83000000 => printenv initrd_addr initrd_addr=0x83800000 => printenv loadaddr loadaddr=0x80800000 Where: fdt_addr -> Device tree blob load address initrd_addr -> RAMDisk load address loadaddr -> zImage load address 7.- Load zImage, DTB and RAMDisk Now we know where to load our zImage, device tree blob and RAMDisk, on Lauterbach this can be achieved by running the following commands: Stop the target and execute: data.load.binary zImage.bin 0x80800000 data.load.binary Your_device.dtb 0x83000000 data.load.binary  core-image-minimal-RAMDISK.rootfs.ext4.gz.u-boot 0x83800000 Let the device run again and deattach from the device in lauterbach this is achieved by: go SYStem.mode.NoDebug start the boot process on u-boot as follows: bootz ${loadaddr} ${initrd_addr} ${fdt_addr} You should now see the Linux kernel boot process on your terminal: After the kernel boots you should see its prompt on your terminal: Since we are running out of RAM there is no way for us to save u-boot's environment variables, but you can modify the source and compile u-boot with the new bootargs, by doing so you can create a Load script that loads all the binaries hits go and the boot process will continue automatically. One way to achieve this is to modify the configuration file under U-boot_dir/include/configs/<your board>.h find the mfgtool_args and modify accordingly. The images attached to this thread have been modified as mentioned.
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    Xenomai is real-time framework, which can run seamlessly side-by-side Linux as a co-kernel system, or natively over mainline Linux kernels (with or without PREEMPT-RT patch). The dual kernel nicknamed Cobalt, is a significant rework of the Xenomai 2.x system. Cobalt implements the RTDM specification for interfacing with real-time device drivers. The native linux version, an enhanced implementation of the experimental Xenomai/SOLO work, is called Mercury. In this environment, only a standalone implementation of the RTDM specification in a kernel module is required, for interfacing the RTDM-compliant device drivers with the native kernel. You can get more detailed information from Home · Wiki · xenomai / xenomai · GitLab       I have ported xenomai 3.1 to i.MX Yocto 4.19.35-1.1.0, and currently support ARMv7 and tested on imx6ulevk/imx6ull14x14evk/imx6qpsabresd/imx6dlsabresd/imx6sxsabresdimx6slevk boards. I also did stress test by tool stress-ng on some boards.      You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm.git, and git checkout Linux-4.19.35-1.1.0. (which inlcudes all patches and bb file) and add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build xenomai by command bitake xenomai.  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt"  PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "4.19-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" DISTRO_FEATURES_remove = "optee" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" PREFERRED_VERSION_linux-imx = "4.19-${XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE}" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" DISTRO_FEATURES_remove = "optee" If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt", you can build dual kernel version. And If  XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury", it is single kernel with PREEMPT-RT patch. The following is test result by the command ( /usr/xenomai/demo/cyclictest -p 50 -t 5 -m -n -i 1000 😞 //Mecury on 6ULL with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 128M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 6.08 2.17 0.81 8/101 534 T: 0 (  530) P:99 I:1000 C:  74474 Min:     23 Act:  235 Avg:   77 Max:    8278 T: 1 (  531) P:99 I:1500 C:  49482 Min:     24 Act:   32 Avg:   56 Max:    8277 T: 2 (  532) P:99 I:2000 C:  36805 Min:     24 Act:   38 Avg:   79 Max:    8170 T: 3 (  533) P:99 I:2500 C:  29333 Min:     25 Act:   41 Avg:   54 Max:    7069 T: 4 (  534) P:99 I:3000 C:  24344 Min:     24 Act:   51 Avg:   60 Max:    7193   //Cobalt on 6ULL with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 128M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 7.02 6.50 4.01 8/100 660 T: 0 (  652) P:50 I:1000 C: 560348 Min:      1 Act:   10 Avg:   15 Max:      71 T: 1 (  653) P:50 I:1500 C: 373556 Min:      1 Act:    9 Avg:   17 Max:      78 T: 2 (  654) P:50 I:2000 C: 280157 Min:      2 Act:   14 Avg:   20 Max:      64 T: 3 (  655) P:50 I:2500 C: 224120 Min:      1 Act:   12 Avg:   15 Max:      57 T: 4 (  656) P:50 I:3000 C: 186765 Min:      1 Act:   31 Avg:   19 Max:      53   //Cobalt on 6qp with stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 8.11 7.44 4.45 8/156 1057 T: 0 (  917) P:50 I:1000 C: 686106 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    5 Max:      53 T: 1 (  918) P:50 I:1500 C: 457395 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    5 Max:      49 T: 2 (  919) P:50 I:2000 C: 342866 Min:      0 Act:    2 Avg:    4 Max:      43 T: 3 (  920) P:50 I:2500 C: 274425 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    5 Max:      58 T: 4 (  921) P:50 I:3000 C: 228682 Min:      0 Act:    2 Avg:    6 Max:      46   //Cobalt on 6dl with stress-ng --cpu 2 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 256M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 3.35 4.15 2.47 1/122 850 T: 0 (  729) P:50 I:1000 C: 608088 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    3 Max:      34 T: 1 (  730) P:50 I:1500 C: 405389 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    4 Max:      38 T: 2 (  731) P:50 I:2000 C: 304039 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    4 Max:      45 T: 3 (  732) P:50 I:2500 C: 243225 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    4 Max:      49 T: 4 (  733) P:50 I:3000 C: 202683 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    5 Max:      38   //Cobalt on 6SX stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M  --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 7.51 7.19 6.66 8/123 670 T: 0 (  598) P:50 I:1000 C:2314339 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    8 Max:      60 T: 1 (  599) P:50 I:1500 C:1542873 Min:      0 Act:   15 Avg:    8 Max:      72 T: 2 (  600) P:50 I:2000 C:1157152 Min:      0 Act:    4 Avg:    9 Max:      55 T: 3 (  601) P:50 I:2500 C: 925721 Min:      0 Act:    5 Avg:    9 Max:      57 T: 4 (  602) P:50 I:3000 C: 771434 Min:      0 Act:    6 Avg:    6 Max:      41   //Cobalt on 6Solo lite stress-ng --cpu 4 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 512M  --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 7.01 7.04 6.93 8/104 598 T: 0 (  571) P:50 I:1000 C:3639967 Min:      0 Act:    9 Avg:    7 Max:      60 T: 1 (  572) P:50 I:1500 C:2426642 Min:      0 Act:    9 Avg:   11 Max:      66 T: 2 (  573) P:50 I:2000 C:1819980 Min:      0 Act:   11 Avg:   10 Max:      57 T: 3 (  574) P:50 I:2500 C:1455983 Min:      0 Act:   12 Avg:   10 Max:      56 T: 4 (  575) P:50 I:3000 C:1213316 Min:      0 Act:    7 Avg:    9 Max:      43   //Cobalt on 7d with stress-ng --cpu 2 --io 2 --vm 1 --vm-bytes 256M --metrics-brief policy: fifo: loadavg: 5.03 5.11 5.15 6/107 683 T: 0 (  626) P:50 I:1000 C:6842938 Min:      0 Act:    1 Avg:    2 Max:      63 T: 1 (  627) P:50 I:1500 C:4561953 Min:      0 Act:    4 Avg:    2 Max:      66 T: 2 (  628) P:50 I:2000 C:3421461 Min:      0 Act:    0 Avg:    2 Max:      69 T: 3 (  629) P:50 I:2500 C:2737166 Min:      0 Act:    3 Avg:    2 Max:      71 T: 4 (  630) P:50 I:3000 C:2280969 Min:      0 Act:    2 Avg:    1 Max:      33   //////////////////////////////////////// Update for Yocto L5.10.52 2.1.0  /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New release for Yocto release L10.52 2.1.0. You need to git clone https://gitee.com/zxd2021-imx/xenomai-arm and git checkout xenomai-5.10.52-2.1.0. Updating: 1, Upgrade Xenomai to v3.2 2, Enable Dovetail instead of ipipe. Copy xenomai-arm to <Yocto folder>/sources/meta-imx/meta-bsp/recipes-kernel, and add the following variable in conf/local.conf before build Image with xenomai enable by command bitake imx-image-multimedia . XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" or XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury" IMAGE_INSTALL_append += " xenomai" Notice: If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "cobalt", you can build dual kernel version. And If XENOMAI_KERNEL_MODE = "mercury", it is single kernel with PREEMPT-RT patch.    
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[中文翻译版] 见附件   原文链接: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343344 
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This document shows the steps for the creation of Archlinux and kernel 4.18.5 on the UDOO board. Required material: UDOO board, Ubuntu 16.04 and SD card. Firts we need u-boot (universal bootloader), for that reason we need update the host. $ sudo apt-get update Then we need the file *.img and SPL for the file system $ wget http://os.archlinuxarm.org/os/imx6/boot/udoo/SPL $ wget http://os.archlinuxarm.org/os/imx6/boot/udoo/u-boot.img Kernel 4.18.5 and file system: $ sudo mkdir archlinux $ wget http ://os.archlinuxarm.org/os/ArchLinuxARM-armv7-latest.tar.gz $ sudo tar -xzvf  ArchLinuxARM-armv7-latest.tar.gz $ sudo rm -rf *.tar.gz You must have the following files Now  We are going to burn the memory, we need a 16Gb of space: We need to make sure it is empty Then partitions: $ sudo fdisk /dev/sdc O, P, N, P, 1 space, 8192 default, W At the end the sdc is partition, then create the filesystem partition $ sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdc1 The working directory $ sudo mkdir mnt mount the partition 1 $ sudo mount /devsdc1 mtn/ Now we where the kernel and filesystem are and copy all the file in mnt: $ sudo cp -vr * ~/mnt/ Once it finish we execute $ sync then unmount the partition of sdc1: $ sudo umount mnt/ Now is moment to load the SPL and u-boot: and $ sync we retire the sd and turn on the board. Now you are on ArchLinux. user: alarm                  root: Root Pass: alarm                 pass: root Now the firts thing we must do it is upgrade the keys: $ pacman -key --init $ pacman -key --populate archlinuxarm $ pacman -Syyuu We can add another user: $ useradd - m -g user  -s /bin/bash user_name $ passwd user_name $ paman -S sudo $ visudo Root ALL= (ALL) ALL user_name ALL=(ALL) ALL $ exit For the graphic we are going to install the xorg: $ sudo pacman -S xorg-server $ sudo pacman -S xorg-apps Now we can execute startx and observe the windows of xorg $ startx To have a windows gestor: $ sudo pacman -S sddm $ sudo pacman -S plasma kde-applications $ sudo systemctl enable sddm Reboot and you are ArchLinux graphics windows
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Some Chinese customers using i.MX series SoC maybe encounter some issues when they download android , u-boot & kernel source code by 'git' command, the following steps will show customer how to get them: 1. Getting repo --No.1 methord # cd ~ # mkdir myandroid # mkdir bin # cd bin # git clone git://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/git-repo.git/ <if git failed, use : git clone https://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/git-repo.git/ > # cd git-repo # cp ./repo ../ --No.2 methord # cd ~ # mkdir bin # curl https://storage.googleapis.com/git-repo-downloads/repo > ~/bin/repo # chmod a+x ~/bin/repo [Note]Customers can select one of above to get "repo" 2. Modifying repo File Open ~/bin/repo file with 'gedit' and Change google address From        REPO_URL = ' https://gerrit.googlesource.com/git-repo ' To        REPO_URL = 'git://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/git-repo'        like following: ## repo default configuration ## REPO_URL = 'git://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/git-repo' REPO_REV = 'stable' 3 、 Setting email address # cd ~/myandroid # git config --global user.email " weidong.sun@nxp.com " # git config --global user.name "weidong.sun" [ Email & Name should be yours] 4 、 Getting manifest # ~/bin/repo init -u https://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/platform/manifest -b android-5.1.1_r1 # cd ~/myandroid/.repo # gedit manifest.xml        Then change the value of fetch to " git://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/ ", like following: <manifest>   <remote name="aosp"            fetch="git://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/" />   <default revision="refs/tags/android-5.1.1_r1" ...... [Note] android-5.1.1_r1 is version of branch,customer can change it to another. 5 、 # ~/bin/repo sync          [Note] During runing repo sync, maybe errors will occur like the following: ...... * [new tag]         studio-1.4 -> studio-1.4 error: Exited sync due to fetch errors          Then 'repo sync' exits. But don't worry about it, continue to run the command please ! " ~/bin/repo sync", downloading source code will be continous. 6 、 Getting Cross Compiler # cd ~/myandroid/prebuilts/gcc/linux-x86/arm # git clone https://aosp.tuna.tsinghua.edu.cn/android/platform/prebuilts/gcc/linux-x86/arm/arm-eabi-4.6 # cd arm-eabi-4.6 # git checkout android-4.4.3_r1 7 、 Getting linux kernel source code        Probably, customer can't normally get linux kernel by using "git clone" command, she can download it directly from the following weblink:        http://git.freescale.com/git/cgit.cgi/imx/linux-2.6-imx.git/        At first, create a temperary directory, then download kernel into the directory. see following steps: # cd ~ /Downloads # mkdir linux-kernel   Atfer downloading l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga.tar.gz, use 'tar zxvf l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga.tar.gz' command to decompress it.        Then you can find a subdirectory name " l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga" is created, linux source code is in the directory, we should copy all files in the directory to ~/myandroid/kernel_imx/ # cd ~/myandroid # mkdir kernel_imx # cd kernel_imx # cp -a ~ /Downloads/linux-kernel/l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga ./ 8 、 Getting uboot source code               Probably, customer can't normally get linux kernel by using "git clone" command, she can download it directly from the following weblink:       http://git.freescale.com/git/cgit.cgi/imx/uboot-imx.git/        We can use similar way to that of linux kernel to get u-boot source code: # cd ~ /Downloads # mkdir u-boot        Download l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga.tar.gz file, and save it in ~ /Downloads/ u-boot, then decompress it, then u-boot source code will be in ~ /Downloads/ u-boot / l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga/, we should copy all file in the path to ~/myandroid/bootable/bootloader/uboot-imx/ # cd ~/myandroid/bootable/bootloader # mkdir uboot-imx # cd uboot-imx # cp -a ~ /Downloads/u-boot/ l5.1.1_2.1.0-ga/ * ./ 9 、 Patch android BSP source code        android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_core_source.gz is the name of patch. Run following command to patch android. # copy android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_core_source.gz /opt/ # tar zxvf android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_core_source.gz # cd /opt/ android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_core_source/code/ # tar zxvf L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga.tar.gz # cd ~/myandroid # source /opt/ android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_core_source/code/ L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga/ and_patch.sh # help # c_patch /opt/ android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_core_source/code/ L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga/ imx_L5.1.1_2.1.0-ga        If everything is OK, the following logs will display on console:               **************************************************************        Success: Now you can build the Android code for FSL i.MX platform               ************************************************************** 10 、 Patch Freescale extended feathures code        Please refer to chapter 3.3 of Android_User's_Guide.pdf to patch another 2 files:        (1) android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_omxplayer_source.gz        (2) android_L5.1.1_2.1.0_consolidated-ga_wfdsink_source.gz [Note]       As for other steps, such as compiling etc, please refer to Android_User's_Guide.pdf that released by NXP. TICS team Weidong Sun 04/01/2016
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A new version of the Pins Tool for i.MX Application Processors has been released and is available for download as desktop tool from Pins Tool for i.MX Application Processors|NXP. The pins Tool for i.MX Application Processors is used for pin routing configuration, validation and code generation, including pin functional/electrical properties, power rails, run-time configurations, with the following main features: Desktop application Muxing and pin configuration with consistency checking Multicore support ANSI-C initialization code Graphical processor package view Multiple configuration blocks/functions Easy-to-use device configuration Selection of Pins and Peripherals Package with IP blocks Routed pins with electrical characteristics Registers with configured and reset values Power Groups with assigned voltage levels Source code for C/C++ applications Documented and easy to understand source code CSV Report and Device Tree File Localized for English and Simplified Chinese Mostly Connected: On-Demand device data download Integrates with any compiler and IDE What's New Added Label support to give signals a name Added ‘Log’ and ‘Problems’ view to report conflicts between settings Added support for templates to store user configurations as starting point for new configurations Added ability to download and share data for devices, especially for off-network host machines i. MX header files are now automatically part of the device data Import of legacy Processor Expert .pe files Export of register defines Various bug fixes and documentation improvements The release notes of the desktop application are attached to this article. Import Processor Expert Files A new importer has been added to import legacy Processor Expert for i.MX files: Labels Signals can now have user defined labels: Templates, Kits, Boards and Processors When creating a new configuration, it offers Templates, Boards and Processors. Custom configurations can be stored as templates and then used for new configurations. Board Specific Functions With the provided board and kit configurations, there are now pre-configured initialization functions for major blocks on the board: Export Data To simplify downloading the device specific data for the desktop tool, the 'Export' function can be used to download and export the data. The data can be copied that way to another machine or all data for a set of devices can be loaded. Export Registers With the Export command the registers can be exported as text/source: This is used to store the register values: /*FUNCTION********************************************************************** * * Function Name : init_audmux_pins * Description   : Configures pin routing and optionally pin electrical features. * *END**************************************************************************/ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_AUD5_INPUT_DA_AMX_SELECT_INPUT_VALUE            0x00000000   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_AUD5_INPUT_DA_AMX_SELECT_INPUT */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_AUD5_INPUT_TXCLK_AMX_SELECT_INPUT_VALUE         0x00000000   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_AUD5_INPUT_TXCLK_AMX_SELECT_INPUT */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_AUD5_INPUT_TXFS_AMX_SELECT_INPUT_VALUE          0x00000000   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_AUD5_INPUT_TXFS_AMX_SELECT_INPUT */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN02_VALUE                  0x00000002   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN02 */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN03_VALUE                  0x00000002   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN03 */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN04_VALUE                  0x00000002   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN04 */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN15_VALUE                  0x00000002   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DI0_PIN15 */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DISP0_DATA16_VALUE               0x00000003   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DISP0_DATA16 */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DISP0_DATA18_VALUE               0x00000003   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DISP0_DATA18 */ #define INIT_AUDMUX_PINS_IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DISP0_DATA19_VALUE               0x00000003   /*!< Register name: IOMUXC_SW_MUX_CTL_PAD_DISP0_DATA19 */ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ We hope you will find this new release useful. Thanks for designing with NXP! 
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