i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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1) rtp linux side: gst-launch mfw_v4lsrc fps-n=30 ! vpuenc codec=6 ! queue ! rtph264pay ! udpsink host=192.168.0.105 port=5000 –v pc side: open the attached H264.sdp file using VLC. Then you can find the picture from camera on mx6 board, pls don’t forget to load camera module 2) Receive Pipeline from Board to PC: gst-launch -v gstrtpbin name=rtpbin udpsrc caps='application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=96' port=5000 ! rtpbin.recv_rtp_sink_0 rtpbin. ! rtph264depay ! queue ! ffdec_h264 ! queue ! autovideosink sync=false  udpsrc port=5001 ! rtpbin.recv_rtcp_sink_0 sync=false rtpbin.send_rtcp_src_0 ! udpsink port=5005 sync=false async=false Output: Setting pipeline to PAUSED ... Pipeline is live and does not need PREROLL ... Setting pipeline to PLAYING ... New clock: GstSystemClock /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:send_rtcp_src_0: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:send_rtcp_src: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstUDPSink:udpsink0.GstPad:sink: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:send_rtcp_src_0.GstProxyPad:proxypad2: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:recv_rtp_sink: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:recv_rtp_sink_0: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:recv_rtp_sink_0.GstProxyPad:proxypad1: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:recv_rtp_src: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:sink: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpJitterBuffer:rtpjitterbuffer0.GstPad:src: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpJitterBuffer:rtpjitterbuffer0.GstPad:sink: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpPtDemux:rtpptdemux0.GstPad:sink: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpH264Depay:rtph264depay0.GstPad:src: caps = video/x-h264, stream-format=(string)byte-stream, alignment=(string)nal /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpH264Depay:rtph264depay0.GstPad:sink: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:recv_rtp_src_0_2621786612_96.GstProxyPad:proxypad4: caps = application/x-rtp, media=(string)video, clock-rate=(int)90000, encoding-name=(string)H264, payload=(int)96 /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue0.GstPad:sink: caps = video/x-h264, stream-format=(string)byte-stream, alignment=(string)nal /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue0.GstPad:src: caps = video/x-h264, stream-format=(string)byte-stream, alignment=(string)nal /GstPipeline:pipeline0/ffdec_h264:ffdec_h2640.GstPad:sink: caps = video/x-h264, stream-format=(string)byte-stream, alignment=(string)nal /GstPipeline:pipeline0/ffdec_h264:ffdec_h2640.GstPad:src: caps = video/x-raw-yuv, width=(int)352, height=(int)288, framerate=(fraction)25/1, format=(fourcc)I420, interlaced=(boolean)false /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue1.GstPad:sink: caps = video/x-raw-yuv, width=(int)352, height=(int)288, framerate=(fraction)25/1, format=(fourcc)I420, interlaced=(boolean)false /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue1.GstPad:src: caps = video/x-raw-yuv, width=(int)352, height=(int)288, framerate=(fraction)25/1, format=(fourcc)I420, interlaced=(boolean)false /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstAutoVideoSink:autovideosink0/GstXvImageSink:autovideosink0-actual-sink-xvimage.GstPad:sink: caps = video/x-raw-yuv, width=(int)352, height=(int)288, framerate=(fraction)25/1, format=(fourcc)I420, interlaced=(boolean)false /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstAutoVideoSink:autovideosink0.GstGhostPad:sink: caps = video/x-raw-yuv, width=(int)352, height=(int)288, framerate=(fraction)25/1, format=(fourcc)I420, interlaced=(boolean)false /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstAutoVideoSink:autovideosink0.GstGhostPad:sink.GstProxyPad:proxypad0: caps = video/x-raw-yuv, width=(int)352, height=(int)288, framerate=(fraction)25/1, format=(fourcc)I420, interlaced=(boolean)false /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:sync_src: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:rtcp_sink: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:rtcp_src_-1673180684: caps = application/x-rtcp /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpJitterBuffer:rtpjitterbuffer0.GstPad:sink_rtcp: caps = application/x-rtcp ^CCaught interrupt -- handling interrupt. Interrupt: Stopping pipeline ... Execution ended after 26282965149 ns. Setting pipeline to PAUSED ... Setting pipeline to READY ... /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstUDPSink:udpsink0.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstAutoVideoSink:autovideosink0/GstXvImageSink:autovideosink0-actual-sink-xvimage.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstAutoVideoSink:autovideosink0.GstGhostPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue1.GstPad:src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue1.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/ffdec_h264:ffdec_h2640.GstPad:src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/ffdec_h264:ffdec_h2640.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue0.GstPad:src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstQueue:queue0.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpH264Depay:rtph264depay0.GstPad:src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpH264Depay:rtph264depay0.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:recv_rtp_src_0_2621786612_96: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:send_rtcp_src_0: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpPtDemux:rtpptdemux0.GstPad:src_96: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpPtDemux:rtpptdemux0.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpJitterBuffer:rtpjitterbuffer0.GstPad:sink_rtcp: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpJitterBuffer:rtpjitterbuffer0.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpJitterBuffer:rtpjitterbuffer0.GstPad:src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:rtcp_src_-1673180684: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:src_-1673180684: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:rtcp_sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSsrcDemux:rtpssrcdemux0.GstPad:sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:sync_src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:send_rtcp_src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:recv_rtp_src: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin/GstRtpSession:rtpsession0.GstPad:recv_rtp_sink: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstRtpBin:rtpbin.GstGhostPad:recv_rtp_sink_0: caps = NULL /GstPipeline:pipeline0/GstUDPSrc:udpsrc0.GstPad:src: caps = NULL Setting pipeline to NULL ... Freeing pipeline ...
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It is based on L3.0.35_GA4.1.0 BSP.   In default Linux BSP, there are 3 kinds of de-interlace mode, motion =0,1,2 mode, motion mode 0 and 1 will use three fields for de-interlace, and motion mode 2 wil use one field for de-interlace, so the whole fps is 30. In this mode, for motion mode 0 and 1, field 1,2,3 was used for first VDI output frame of display; and field 3,4,5 was used for second VDI output frame of display; field 5,6,7 was used for third VDI output frame of display. One field data (such as 2,4,6) was used only once, so there is data lost.   After applied these patches, the VDI de-interlace output will be 60fps: for motion mode 0 and 1, field 0,1,2 was used for first VDI output frame of display; and field 1,2,3 was used for second VDI output frame of display; field 2,3,4 was used for third VDI output frame of display. So all field data will be used twice, there is no video data lost, the VDI quality was improved.   Kernel patches: 0001-Add-MEM-to-VDI-to-MEM-support-for-IPU.patch 0002-Add-IPU-IC-memcpy-support.patch 0003-IPU-VDI-support-switch-odd-and-even-field-in-motion-.patch 0004-IPU-VDI-correct-vdi-top-field-setting.patch   mxc_v4l2_tvin_imx6_vdi_60fps.zip: this is the test application sample code.   Test commands, parameter "-vd" means double fps VDI: ./mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 0 -ow 720 -oh 480 -m 0 -vd  
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The document includes the following contents: (1)document how to port ov5646 to android jb4.2.2 (2) ov5645 driver for Linux 3.0.35 (3) ov5645 schematic based on i.MX6Q/DL (4)ov5645 for android camera HAL   [Note:]      P5V29A-0JG is a camera module based on OV5645, and PAO532-0JG is based on OV5640, both manufactured by NINGBO SUNNY OPOTECH CO.LTD (China), If customer wants to use them on i.MX6 platform, can send me email to ask for datasheets of P5V29A & PAO532 , or discuss corresponding questions on porting.   Email: weidong.sun@freescale.com
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For iMX6DQ, there are two IPUs, so they can support up to 4 cameras at the same time. But the default BSP can only support up to two cameras at the same time.     The attached patch can make the BSP support up to 4 cameras based on 3.10.53 GA 1.1.0 BSP.   The 4 cameras can be: - 1xCSI, 3xMIPI - 2xCSI, 2xMIPI - 4xMIPI   For 4xMIPI case, the four cameras should be combined on the single MIPI CSI2 interface, and each camera data should be transfered on a mipi virtual channel.   In this patch, we given the example driver for Intersil ISL79985. The input to ISL79985 is four CVBS camera. There are four patches: 0001-IPU-update-IPU-capture-driver-to-support-up-to-four-.patch      Updated IPU common code to support up to four cameras.   0002-Add-Intersil-ISL79985-MIPI-Video-Decoder-Driver-for-.patch      ISL79985 driver, which can support both 1 lanes and 2 lanes mode.   0003-Remove-the-page-size-align-requirement-for-v4l2-capt.patch      With this patch, the mxc_v4l2_tvin test application can use overlay framebuffer as V4l2 capture buffer directly.   0004-IPU-CSI-Drop-1-2-frame-on-MIPI-interface-for-interla.patch      This patch is option, it will drop one field data, so for each camera, the input will be 720*240 30 FPS.   For 720P HD solution, it is based on Maxim MAX9286: iMX6DQ MAX9286 MIPI CSI2 720P camera surround view solution for Linux BSP   How to builld the kernel with ISL79985 support:       make imx_v7_defconfig       make menuconfig (In this command, you should select the ISL79985 driver:             Device Drivers  --->                   <*> Multimedia support  --->                         [*]   V4L platform devices  --->                               <*>   MXC Video For Linux Video Capture                                       MXC Camera/V4L2 PRP Features support  --->                                           <*>Intersil ISL79985 Video Decoder support                                           <*>mxc VADC support                                           <*>Select Overlay Rounting (Queue ipu device for overlay library)                                           <*>Pre-processor Encoder library                                           <*>IPU CSI Encoder library)       make zImage       make dtbs   The built out image file:       arch/arm/boot/dts/imx6q-sabresd.dtb       arch/arm/boot/zImage   "mxc_v4l2_tvin.zip" is the test application, test command to capture the four cameras and render on 1080P HDMI display: /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 0 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 1 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 2 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 3 -g2d &   2015-10-10 Update: Updated the test application "mxc_v4l2_tvin_isl79985.tar.gz" to fix the Yocto build errors. Updated ISL79985 register setting " page5 , isl79985_write_reg(0x07, 0x46)" in patch "0002-Add-Intersil-ISL79985-MIPI-Video-Decoder-Driver-for-.patch", which can fix the green line issue.   2016-01-25 Update: Added de-interlace support, L3.10.53_ISL79985_Surroundview_Patch_20160125.tar.gz New test capplication for de-interlance: mxc_v4l2_tvin_isl79985_vdi_20160125.tar.gz New test commands: /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 0 -g2d -m & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 1 -g2d -m & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 2 -g2d -m & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 3 -g2d -m &   Note:  with the 0005-Add-interlaced-mode-capture-for-ISL79985.patch, the V4l2 capture driver will return 720x480 video size, but only odd lines have the video data, they are filled in line skip line mode.     2016-11-21 Update: Added ISL79987 support, L3.10.53_ISL7998x_Surroundview_Patch_20161121.zip New test capplication for de-interlance support: mxc_v4l2_tvin_isl7998x.tar.gz   Test commands (without de-interlace): /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 0 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 1 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 2 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 3 -g2d &   Test commands (with de-interlace, for ISL79987 only): /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 0 -m 1 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 1 -m 1 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 2 -m 1 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 3 -m 1 -g2d &     Now the same patch can support both ISL79985 and ISL79987, with NTSC CVBS camera, for ISL79985, it captures 60fps 720*240; for ISL79987, it captures 30fps 720*480.   2016-11-22 Update: Added patch for L4.1.15 BSP, it supports both ISL79985 and ISL79987, L4.1.15_ISL7998x_Surroundview_Patch_20161122.zip Test capplication mxc_v4l2_tvin_isl7998x.tar.gz is re-used.
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The document will introduce all steps for poring WM8960 audio codec to freescale android4.2.2 BSP. Attachments include : (1)Document for porting (2)Codec driver : wm8960.c (3)Machine driver: imx-wm8960.c (4)wm8960 schematic for reference (5)Android Audio HAL: config_wm8960.h (6)schematic: MX6QDL-PIANO-CNFV1.DSN (7)i.MX6DL BSP files mx6dl_piano.c mx6dl_piano.h mx6dl_piano_pmic_pfuse100.c (8)i.MX6Q BSP files mx6q_piano.c mx6q_piano.h mx6q_piano_pmic_pfuse100.c   Freescale TICS Team Weidong.sun
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Uploading the i.MX 6 Linux Reference Manual here after being un-able to find it on Google or on i.MX6 product page.
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INTRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS CREATE A NEW PROJECT GPU EXAMPLE GSTREAMER EXAMPLE 1. INTRODUCTION:      The below steps show how to create different application examples using Elipse IDE. 2. REQUIREMENTS:      A fully working image and meta-toolchain generated in Yocto . You can follow the  next training: Yocto Training - HOME      Install and configure the Yocto Eclipse Plug-in. For more details about this requirement please refer to Setting up the Eclipse IDE for Yocto Application Development         To demonstrate the steps, L3.14.28  BSP, fsl-image-qt5 image and i.MX6Q SABRE-SDP board were used. 3. CREATE A NEW PROJECT      Follow the section Creating a Hello World Project of this document Setting up the Eclipse IDE for Yocto Application Development 4. GPU EXAMPLE           For this project we use the source code found in the fsl-gpu-sdk that can be downloaded from:      https://www.freescale.com/webapp/Download?colCode=IMX6_GPU_SDK&location=null&Parent_nodeId=1337637154535695831062&Parent…      Follow section 3 and create a new project named gputest.      From the IMX6_GPU_SDK choose one of the examples of GLES2.0 folder. In this case the 01_SimpleTriangle is chosen.      Copy the .c and .h files to the src directory of the gputest project. The Project Explorer window should look like this:              Add the needed files and libraries to compile and link in the Makefile.am file found in the ´src´ folder. The Makefile.am file should have the below content:          bin_PROGRAMS = gputest          gputest_SOURCES = gputest.c fsl_egl.c fslutil.c          AM_CFLAGS = @gputest_CFLAGS@          AM_LDFLAGS = @gputest_LIBS@ -lstdc++ -lm -lGLESv2 -lEGL -lX11 -ldl          CLEANFILES = *~ ​    Add the PATH to CFLAGS where the compiler will look for the headers at Project->Properties->Autotools->configure:           In this project there is no need to add extra PATHs for the headers. Apply the changes by clicking on Reconfigure Project. Build the project To test the file you can send the executable to the board with:           $ scp gputest root@<board_ip>:/home/root      $./gputest      You should get the next output in the display: 5. GSTREAMER EXAMPLE      For this project we use the source code found at Basic tutorial 1: Hello world! - GStreamer SDK documentation - GStreamer SDK documentation    Follow section 3 and create a new project named Gstreamer.    Copy the code of the basic tutorial to your Gstreamer.c file.    Add the needed files and libraries to compile and link in the Makefile.am file found in the ´src´ folder. The Makefile.am file should have the below content:                           bin_PROGRAMS = Gstreamer      Gstreamer_SOURCES = Gstreamer.c      AM_CFLAGS = @Gstreamer_CFLAGS@      AM_LDFLAGS = @Gstreamer_LIBS@ -lstdc++  -lVDK -lm -lGLESv2 -lGAL -lEGL  -ldl -lgstreamer-0.10 -lgobject-2.0 -lgmodule-2.0 -lgthread-2.0 -lrt -lxml2 -lglib-2.0      CLEANFILES = *~         ​    Add the PATH to CFLAGS where the compiler will look for the headers at Project->Properties->Autotools->configure:           For this example the next lines are added             -I${Sysroot}/usr/include/gstreamer-1.0        -I${Sysroot}/usr/include/glib-2.0        -I${Sysroot}/usr/include/libxml2        -I${Sysroot}/usr/lib/glib-2.0/include      Apply the changes by clicking on Reconfigure Project. Build the project To test the file you can send the executable to the board with:           $ scp Gstreamer root@<board_ip>:/home/root To execute the application on the board:      $./Gstreamer The board should have internet access and the application should play the video found at http://docs.gstreamer.com/media/sintel_trailer-480p.webm
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Platform: Ubuntu 12.04 Board: Freescale MCIMX6Q-SDP  and  MCIMX-LVDS1 Screen BSP: L3.0.35_4.1.0_ER_SOURCE_BSP Other device: PC , One Router, 3 Network Cable and 2 usb-otg lines The  platform is as follow: Boot form NFS is very convenient in porting and debugging, and will value us much time. If the customers have modified the kernel and rebuild the kernel to generate the uImage running on board, he can directly download the uImage to the board by TFTP network. It is fast and can avoid the normal operation ,  first customers need to copy the images to the mfgtool specified directory and download the u-boot, uImage and file sytem again to the flash device in board, and then change to boot up mode to boot up the board. If customers are doing debug this operation will waste lot of time. So use the NFS is vey convenient. Beyond this, in the target board customers can also read the files and content in host machine. In a word, use NFS it will help save much time and also convenient. So the follows is introduce and show how to set NFS and then boot up the board. 1 Preparation (1)Build the BSP Build up the L3.0.35_4.1.0_ER_SOURCE_BSP use LTIB on the Ubuntu12.04, you can refer to our user guide document here no details. The u-boot, uImage and file system are all under the directory of litb. Boot up from NFS, so when build uImage some items are needed, here you can see the build details in the section of  Setting Target Linux Image to use NFS in this articel. (2)Download the u-boot to the target board Use the mfgtool Mfgtools-Rel-4.1.0_130816_MX6Q_UPDATER to download the u-boot to the SD card of MCIMX6Q-SDP board or use dd command to write the u-boot to SD card.( By the way, writing to the EMMC is also OK) 2 Setting the NFS Environment Set host machine 1 - Install NFS Service on host typing:     $sudo apt-get install nfs-kernel-server       2 - Create symbolic link to ltib/rootfs     $sudo ln -s <ltib instalation folder>/rootfs /tftpboot/rootfs       3 - Setup exports typing:     $sudo gedit /etc/exports       and add the following line:     /tftpboot/rootfs/ *(rw,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check,async) 4 - Restart the NFS server:     $sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server restart       Now the host is ready to use NFS Setting Target Linux Image to use NFS       1. Run LTIB configuration by typing: $cd <ltib instalation folder>       $./ltib -c       2. On first page menu, go to "Target Image Generation -> Options"       3. Select the option NFS only and exit LTIB configuration to compile with the new configuration. 4. LTIB should start new compiling and create a new Linux image on /<ltib instalation folder>/rootfs/boot/uImage      5. Copy the created image on /<ltib instalation folder>/rootfs/boot/uImage to /tftpboot/uImage 6. The system is ready to run with NFS. The root file system on target will be located on host on /<ltib instalation folder>/rootfs/ 3 Setting the u-boot command line (1)Download the u-boot to the target board fist according to the section 1 (2) Download the u-boot to the target board. Then give the power to the board, boot up board, u-boot boot up. (2)Configuration the Network Configure the Network and IP , to make the target board and the host machine IP are in the local area network of Router. (3)Set the u-boot command line As follow is my setting for you to refer to : 4 Boot up the board Running the “run bootcmd” after setting the u-boot parameters then boot up the kernel and file system. We can see that the board download the uImage by the TFTP from host machine, then boot up the kernel and finally mount the NFS in the kernel. As follows is the details: Downloading the uImage success and boot up kernel: Input root and access the system. Test: Create a new file in the host machine directory, you can see in the next picture: Then open the target board, in the terminal go to the same directory  in the unit_test we can see the same name. So as we can see in the above operation we can see it is very convenient and fast use the NFS. It will help save time and speed the development time.
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current imx6 bsp, not only ltib but also yocto couldn't support subtitle. now we have two solution to support subtitle on yocto, 1)one is extract the subtitle, then draw the subtitle on the video by UI, which is supported by the imxplayer. this solution is using QT by imxplayer, so if you build yocto, should choose QT as target. basicly, aiurdemux send the text to the QT by appsink, then QT draw the text on the UI layer. when build the yocot, pls using the command as below: " bitbake fsl-image-qt5" copy the font libary to the /usr/lib/fonts , then when you play the imxplayer, choose the font you need. 2)another one is blending the subtitle on the video buffer by gstreamer, then output with video enable gst pango lib in gstreamer1.0-plugins-base change playbin flag to disable native video flag basetextoverlay apply patch http://cgit.freedesktop.org/gstreamer/gst-plugins-base/commit/ext/pango/gstbasetextoverlay.c?id=267a8c24af4f02ba6f3075bd589d3c5d1dc826e9 use following command line gst-launch-1.0 playbin flags=0x17 uri=file://$VIDEO_FILE suburi=file://$SUBTITLE_FILE
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1.  Software change for Certification Test Compared to standard Linux/Android release, you may need to do below software changes to implement the certification tests, it is applicable from imx_3.10.31_1.1.0 Linux BSP GA release, for the release before that, user may need to apply the related patches before doing below things, and some examples may be different for former releases, the user needs to change accordingly. See the detailed information in this document “How to do USB Compliance Test for 3.10.y kernel”. And there is also a link describes the patch for USB Certification Test: Patch to make i.MX6DQ USB to support test modes for certification test 2. I.MX6 series USB Certification Guide http://cache.freescale.com/files/microcontrollers/doc/user_guide/IMXUSBCGUG.pdf Include the descriptions of all the Certification Test requirements, equipment, procedures for I.MX6 series. For example, Host/Device High Speed Eye Diagram Test(眼图测试).   3. Description of USBCertification related Registers AN4589 Configuring USB on i.MX 6 Series Processors http://cache.freescale.com/files/32bit/doc/app_note/AN4589.pdf   4. I.MX6Q/ I.MX6DL/ I.MX6SL / I.MX6SX Certification Reports, see attachments   5. Checklist and TPL, see attachments. Original Attachment has been moved to: I.MX6SX-Checklist-and-TPL.zip
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Please make sure design is follow below checking list before checking this guide. HW Design Checking List for i.MX6DQSDL
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   The purpose of this article is to describe how to join together the Processor Expert and ARM GCC toolchain under Eclipse environment.    Freescale provides the Processor Expert, which contains the Pin Settings Tool to support an easy way to configure pin signals, from multiplexing to the electrical properties of pins. With such Tool all the pins can be configured with a graphical user interface, and then generate C code, in order to use it as an example in applications. Please refer to the following Web for more details. http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=PROCESSOR-EXPERT-IMX   The Processor Expert Software for i.MX Processors (Version 1.0) does not include a compiler or linker. Customers should merge the generated code into a build system.   However, it is possible to use common Eclipse-based IDE for the Processor Expert (V 1.0) and GNU ARM “C” toolchains. In particular, the following sequence may be implemented for both Linux and Windows hosts. 1. Install Eclipse (Kepler release) IDE for C/C++ Developers. https://eclipse.org/downloads/packages/eclipse-ide-cc-developers/keplersr2 2. Add Eclipse Processor Expert plug-in, as recommended in the documentation. http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=PROCESSOR-EXPERT-IMX https://community.freescale.com/docs/DOC-101470 3.  Add GNU ARM Eclipse, which contains configurations for different toolchains, including Linux ones. http://gnuarmeclipse.livius.net/blog/plugins-install/ 4. Install appropriate toolchain. For bare-metal applications Sourcery CodeBench Lite for ARM is sutable one. Sourcery CodeBench Lite Edition including ARM GCC IDE - Mentor Graphics Please use Getting Started Guide document from the CodeBench Lite package, that explains how to install and build applications with the CodeBench Lite.    As an example, let’s consider minimal startup code for i.MX6Q (LED flickering project on i.MX6Q SDB / SDP). Assuming Eclipse IDE with the Processor Expert and GNU ARM tools is installed, we should create new “C” project under Eclipse : New -> C Project. Select “Empty Project” and “Cross ARM GCC”, enter “Project name”. Then : select “Advanced settings” -> C/C++ Build -> Settings Tab “Target Processor” : ARM Family : cortex – a9 Architecture : armv7-a Instruction set : ARM (-marm) Endianness : Little endian (-mlittle-endian) FloatABI : Library with FP (softfp) FPU Type : neon Unaligned access : Disabled (-mno-unaligned-access) “Cross ARM GNU Create Flash Image” : General : Raw binary. TAB “Toolchains” : Name : Sourcery CodeBench Lite for ARM EABI (arm-none-eabi-gcc) (If needed customers can select appropriate toolchain) Architecture : ARM (AArch32) Prefix : arm-none-eabi Check “Use global toolchain path” or select the required path directly.  Source codes may added via Eclipse : File -> Import -> File System -> From directory Example source is enclosed. After sources as included in the project, let’s configure linker options via project properties, C/C++ Build -> Settings -> Tool Settings -> Cross ARM C Linker -> General. Add script file “mx6dq.ld”, uncheck “Remove unused section”, check “Do not use standard start files”.   Note, the article of Miro Samek is very helpful in clarifying of startup code and linker script. Please refer to “Building Bare-Metal ARM Systems with GNU”. Article Published online at www.Embedded.com,  July/August 2007. So, now we can build the project : Project -> Build Project. Two executable file will be generated : test.elf (for JTAG debugger) and test.bin, which may be used to create bootable SD card, using cfimager-imx.exe utility : CMD> cfimager-imx -o 0 -f test.bin -d g: Please use readme files in the enclosed for more details.
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NFS and TFTP Boot 1  Introduction This document explains the required steps to boot Linux Kernel and mount a NFS on your target. 2 Requirements A functional Yocto environment (Images generated for your target). Your preferred target.  (SABRE-AI, SABRE-SD) 1 Ethernet Cable 1 Micro USB cable USB to Serial converter depending on your target features. 3 Yocto Folders When you develop your Linux kernel and Root File System with Yocto, different folders are created and each folder contains different information. {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/ {TARGET}/  This directory contains the output images, like Kernel, U-Boot and the File System in a tar file. This directory will be used to fetch the kernel and device tree blob file only. {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/sysroot/{TARGET}/  This folder contains all the development files used to generate our Yocto images. Here we can find all the dynamic libraries and headers used for development. This folder is used as parameter for cross-compilation. {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs This folder contains the uncompressed rootfs of our target. This folder will be used as entry in the host NFS server. 4 IP Address and Network Setup This section covers how to boot Linux that mounts the root file system (RFS) over the network. Remember that in this scenario, the RFS exists on the laptop hard drive, and the kernel that runs on the target board will mount the RFS over Ethernet. This setup is used for developing and debugging Linux applications. It allows for applications to be loaded and run without having to re-boot the kernel each time. First some packages on your host need to be installed: # apt-get install xinetd tftp tftpd isc-dhcp-server nfs-kernel-server portmap For development, it is best to have a static IP setup for the board and Linux environment. This way U-Boot options won’t change between reboots as you get a new IP address as you would using DHCP. 4.1 Linux Host Setup This section describes how to setup a static IP in your Linux host environment. This is not required but will allow the IP address of your virtual host system to remain unchanged. Because u-boot parameters use specific IP addresses, this step is recommended because u-boot parameters may need to be updated in the future to match your virtual IP address if it should ever change. You could take the existing IP address and make it static, but you would lose the Internet connection in your virtual machine. Instead we want to make use of the virtual environment and add a secondary Ethernet port that is tied to your wired Internet connection, while keeping the original Ethernet port which can use the wireless connection on your laptop. In the Linux virtual environment, type sudo ifconfig and note that you should have one Ethernet adapter (eth0). The other item listed (lo) is a virtual port for loopback mode. Shutdown the Linux virtual machine In VMware Player, go to Edit virtual machine settings. And add a Bridged Network Adapter, choosing only the wired Ethernet port. And click on OK.  See below for example: Start up the Linux VM. Open a terminal and type: sudo ifconfig You should have a new entry (eth1). This is the new Ethernet port you created in the virtual machine, and it is bridged to your wired Ethernet port. This is the port we want to make a static IP address. To set eth1 to a static IP, open /etc/nework/interfaces sudo gedit /etc/network/interfaces Add the following to set eth1 to your desired IP address. auto eth1 iface eth1 inet static address 192.168.0.100      <-- Your HOST IP netmask 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.0.1 Save the file Restart eth1 sudo ifdown eth1 sudo ifup eth1 4.2 Target Setup We need to setup the network IP address of our target. Power On the board and hit a key to stop the U-Boot from continuing. Set the below parameters: setenv serverip 192.168.0.100 <-- This must be your Host IP address setenv ipaddr 192.168.1.102  <-- This must be your target IP addres setenv ip_dyn no The path where the rootfs is placed in our host has to be indicated in the U-Boot: setenv nfsroot /home/usuario/fsl-release-bsp/buildimx6q/tmp/work/imx6qsabresd-poky-linux-gnueabi/fsl-image-gui/1.0-r0/rootfs setenv image zImage setenv fdt_file uImage-imx6q-sabresd.dtb setenv netargs 'setenv bootargs console=${console},${baudrate} ${smp} root=/dev/nfs ip={ipaddr} nfsroot=${serverip}:${nfsroot},v3,tcp' 4.3 TFTP and NFS Configuration Now configure the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server and Networked File System (NFS) server. This is how U-Boot will download (via TFTP) the Linux kernel, and then the kernel will mount (via NFS) its root file system on the computer hard drive. 4.3.1 TFTP Setup Next setup the TFTP server. The following commands show that we are logged in as root (#). If you are not root ($) then precede each instruction with “sudo”. Edit /etc/xinetd.conf gedit /etc/xinetd.conf Add and save the following lines in the file service tftp { socket_type = dgram protocol = udp wait = yes user = root server = /usr/sbin/in.tftpd server_args = -s {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/ {TARGET}/  disable = no } Notice that {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/ {TARGET}/   has to be written as absolute path. Restart the xinetd service service xinetd restart Test that TFTP is working tftp localhost tftp> get {An Image found in the tftp folder} tftp> quit 4.3.2 NFS Setup Edit the /etc/exports file gedit /etc/exports Add the path where the rootfs is found in your host. {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs *(rw,no_root_squash)                                                                 NOTE:      {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs may work most of the times,        but it is recommended to untar the {IMAGE}.bz2 in an exported           folder keeping using sudoand keeping the chmod of each file.     3. Restart the NFS service sudo service portmap stop sudo service nfs-kernel-server stop sudo service portmap start sudo service nfs-kernel-server start 5 Host Final Configuration and Booting Linux over NFS In your host, under the images folder {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/ {TARGET}/ create the below links ln -s zImage_imx_v7_defconfig zImage      2. In U-boot type the below command:                run netboot After a pair of minutes you should get a Linux working system on your target.
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All, This document will help you to understand the " YOCTO PROJECT COMMUNITY LAYERS" and the " YOCTO PROJECT FREESCALE OFFICIAL RELEASE" differences and where the layer content is coming from.   Best Regards, Luis
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                                                                                         Watch the Freescale i.MX team boot up Android 5.0 Lollipop in i.mx6 application processors—在线播放—优酷网,视频高清在线观看 The Freescale i.MX Android team has booted up Android 5.0 Lollipop in the SABRE platform for i.mx6 series. Google pushed all of the latest source for its Android release to AOSP on Nov. 5, and the Freescale Android Team started their work. With the previous 6 days to boot Android Lollipop up, the Freescale i.MX Android team enabled the basic features like connectivity, audio/video playback, sensors, inputs and display on day 7! You can see the some changes in the demo video at the beginning of the post. The Freescale i.MX Android team has closely followed almost every version of Android since it is released by AOSP and has good experience on it. Below are some snapshots and pictures for the Android Lollipop.
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This document explains how to create a DS-5 project to compile and debug the SDK and OBDS for iMX6 and iMX28 respectively. Attached you can find the .ds file for the iMX28 needed to debug in DS-5.
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Most common issues with bringup and memory stability come down to memory/system setup during startup phase of i.MX device.   This Python script allows you to dump IVT/DCD tables and data from a i.MX binary (either generated as result of build process or a simple dump of SD/NOR/NAND... content) and analyze them in an easier way. Should work with i.MX 6 and i.MX53 binaries.   Parser for i.MX 6 will also try to print out register values it recognizes, and also parse specific register fields, helping to analyze the data faster. This can be extended if needed to other registers/values.   imxbin.py works with Python3.x and imxbin_2x.py with Python 2.x, so choose appropriate version.   Vladan
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It is based on 3.0.35 GA 4.1.0 BSP.   0001-Correct-mipi-camera-virtual-channel-setting-in-ipu_c.patch It is the updated IPU code for MIPI ID and SMFC setting in ipu_capture.c. These setting should not be combined with MIPI virtual channel value, they shoule be fixed with ID 0.   0002-Use-virtual-channel-3-for-ov5640-mipi-camera-on-iMX6.patch The sample code to modify ov5640_mipi camera to use virtual channel 3 on SabreSD board.   The followed command can be used to verify the mipi camera function after booted into Linux: $ gst-launch mfw_v4lsrc capture-mode=1 device=/dev/video1 ! mfw_v4lsink     2014-09-30 update: Added the patch for 3.10.17_GA1.0.0 BSP. "L3.10.17_1.0.0_mipi_camera_virtual_channel_3.zip"  
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Design Check Lists: HW Design Checking List for i.MX6DQSDL HW Design Checking List for i.Mx53 Hardware Design Checklist for i.MX28 HW_Design_Checking_List_for_i.MX6SoloX i.MX6UL Hardware design checklist DDR Design Tool: i.Mx6DQSDL DDR3 Script Aid MX6DQP DDR3 Script Aid i.Mx6DQSDL LPDDR2 Script Aid i.Mx6SL LPDDR2 Script Aid i.MX6SX DDR3 Script Aid I.MX6UL DDR3 Script Aid i.MX6UL_LPDDR2_Script_Aid i.MX6ULL_DDR3_Script_Aid  i.MX6ULL_LPDDR2_Script_Aid  MX6SLL_LPDDR2_Script_Aid  MX6SLL_LPDDR3_Script_Aid  I.MX53 DDR3 Script Aid i.MX8M DDR3L register programming aid  i.MX6 DDR Stress Test Tool V1.0.3 imx53 DDR stress tester V0.042 i.MX6/7 DDR Stress Test Tool V3.00 i.MX8MSCALE DDR Tool Release  Application Notes: MX_Design_Validation_Guide I.MX6 series USB Certification Guides
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Here is a quick summary at booting a Linux system on the i.MX 6 Sabre SD platform, through USB. This assumes you have a "working" Linux development environment at hand (e.g. Debian ), and that your are able to build a working Linux system with buildroot already , as explained in this post. You will also need libusb-1.0 development files (headers and libraries), as well as root/sudo permissions to access USB peripherals . Also, we will use the fine imx_usb_loader tool that the nice folks at Boundary Devices have developed for their i.MX 5/6 boards, as it works fine for Sabre sd as well. Get buildroot sources We will use git to fetch buildroot sources: $ git clone git://git.busybox.net/buildroot This should create a buildroot directory with all the latest sources (after a while). Note that for more stability you might want to checkout a release instead of the latest version; to do so, list the available release tags with e.g. git tag -l '201*' , and git checkout <the-desired-tag> . Compile buildroot The beauty of buildroot is that it will take care of everything for you, including preparing a cross compiler. You can configure buildroot for Sabre SD by doing: $ cd buildroot $ make freescale_imx6sabresd_defconfig By default this would generate binaries suitable for booting with an SD card, so we need to tweak a few settings to obtain a ramdisk, which u-boot will like. Summon the configuration menu with the following command : $ make menuconfig Descend into the "Filesystem images" submenu, and select the following buildroot options: cpio the root filesystem (for use as an initial RAM filesystem) Compression method (gzip) Create U-Boot image of the root filesystem Exit, saving your configuration. You might want to verify that you have indeed the the correct options in your .config : $ grep '^BR2_TARGET_ROOTFS_CPIO' .config This should return the following: BR2_TARGET_ROOTFS_CPIO=y BR2_TARGET_ROOTFS_CPIO_GZIP=y BR2_TARGET_ROOTFS_CPIO_UIMAGE=y You may then proceed with the build: $ make This should download and build everything, so it will take a while. Note that, as bryanthomas pointed out, there are no files for the sabre sd in the boards folder. This is because no patches or custom kernel configurations are needed outside of what is defined in the defconfig . So t he only place the sabre sd board lives in buildroot is in the configs directory. At the time of writing we still need a small final hack to have Linux boot on /init instead of its default /linuxrc for proper boot on ramdisk, though. Hopefully this should be addressed in a future buildroot version, and a patch is on his way, but for now we change the boot script in our target filesystem with: $ cd output/target $ ln -svf init linuxrc $ cd ../.. $ make All build results will fall under the o utput/images folder. We are most interested in the following pieces: output/images/ +- imx6q-sabresq.dtb +- rootfs.cpio.uboot +- u-boot.imx `- uImage Get imx_usb_loader sources We will use git to fetch imx_usb_loader sources: $ git clone git://github.com/boundarydevices/imx_usb_loader.git This should create an imx_usb_loader directory with all the latest sources. Compile imx_usb_loader Assuming your Linux development environment has the necessary libusb-1.0 headers and libraries, you can simply build by doing: $ cd imx_usb_loader $ make This should compile an imx_usb tool in the current folder. Prepare your payload and configuration First, copy all the necessary buildroot generated items to the imx_usb_loader directory. You will need: u-boot.imx uImage imx6q-sabresd.dtb rootfs.cpio.uboot Now we need to explain to imx_usb what we want to download to the i.MX romcode through USB. Add the following lines in the end of the mx6_usb_work.conf : ... u-boot.imx:dcd,plug uImage:load 0x12000000 rootfs.cpio.uboot:load 0x12C00000 imx6q-sabresd.dtb:load 0x18000000 u-boot.imx:clear_dcd,jump header The first line with dcd, plug uses u-boot header to configure the DDR3 memory, allowing us to download contents to the Sabre SD memory. This is exactly what the three subsequent lines with load directives do. The last line re-uses u-boot one more time to find out the address where to jump ( jump header directive), but not touching the DDR configuration any more thanks to the clear_dcd directive (thanks jeanmariepons-b46892 for the tips) . Look at the comments in mx6_usb_work.conf for (a bit) more details on the various directives available. Also, note that all the absolute addresses mentioned above are what u-boot needed at the time of writing. Hopefully this should be fairly stable. Boot through USB! We are all set for booting now. Connect to the USB to UART port with a serial terminal set to 115200 baud, no parity, 8bit data. Connect also your PC to the USB OTG port of the Sabre SD, and make sure you have no SD card inserted and power up the platform. The Sabre SD should not boot into an operating system, but rather wait for a payload to download through USB. You might want to verify that it is indeed waiting with the following command: $ lsusb In the resulting output, there should be a line like the following: Bus 001 Device 098: ID 15a2:0054 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. i.MX 6Dual/6Quad SystemOnChip in RecoveryMode On your PC, start the download of our "payload" to your Sabre SD with: $ sudo ./imx_usb (Note that you need proper permissions to do that.) After download of all the pieces, u-boot should start in its "mfgtools mode", as reflected by the following messages on UART: ... Boot from USB for mfgtools Use default environment for mfgtools Run bootcmd_mfg: run mfgtool_args;bootm ${loadaddr} ${initrd_addr} ${fdt_addr}; ... The Linux kernel should then start, and y our buildroot system should reach a prompt: ... Welcome to Buildroot buildroot login : From there you may login as root . Enjoy! See also... This post details the buildroot steps a bit more. This post explains how to build a ramdisk for i.MX6 with busybox directly. AdeneoEmbedded - Whitepaper on USB loader for i.MX6 platforms imx_usb_loader README on github Buildroot: making embedded Linux easy
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