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i.MX Processors Knowledge Base

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[中文翻译版] 见附件   原文链接: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343518 
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[中文翻译版] 见附件   原文链接: https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343761 
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Instrumenting A Board To instrument a board, the connection between the power supply and the target device needs to be broken, usually via a series resistor that's placed on the board. Sometimes the inductor needs to be lifted if no series resistor was included on the rail by the board's designer. In the ideal case, through-hole connections were also provided on the board for the connection of these off-board sensors. Here are three close-up photos that show several boards that have been instrumented: In all three cases, the sensors stand in place via the two outer current carrying wires. The middle and right used insulated wires where as the one on the left used bare wires. In all three cases, the sensor's   +   connection needs to go towards the power supply and the   - connection goes to the target device. The outer wires here are 24-26 gauge. (The relatively heavy gauge wire is used to keep the series resistance of inserting a smart sensor to a minimum.) The ground connection is the middle hole of the smart sensor. In the left and middle photos, a 30 gauge wire connects to the middle hole ground connection on the  board. In the right photo, the ground wire was more conveniently added to a big cap just below the bottom of edge of the photo. Here are wider angle view photos of two of the boards above: The sensors on the left are free-standing since the current carrying wires are stiff enough to hold them upright. Care must be taken since too much flexing will cause a wire to break. Too much bending can also cause a short to the board (and that's why insulated wires were used on these boards). The board on the right has the sensors laying parallel to the board. They are not affixed to the board, but a wire is wrapped around the bundle of ribbon cables out of view past the right edge of the photo. For boards without the through hole connections, the smart sensors need to be immobilized to keep from pulling the SMT pads off the board. If there is room on the board or sides of connectors or large components, the sensors may be attached down with foam double-sticky tape (see photo below, sensor affixed on top i.MX7ULP): For boards where there are no convenient unpopulated areas or there are too many sensors, some other means needs to be devised to immoblize the smart sensors. In the left photo below, two inductors per sensor have been flipped and the two sensors inserted to instrument the two rails. The solder pads on the inductors would easily be broken off by any movement of the smart sensors, so a cage with clamps to hold the ribbon cables was 3D printed. On the back side, there is room for the aggregator to be zip tied to the bottom plate, so the instrumented board can be moved as a single unit with minimal flexing of the ribbon cables.
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When you do long test (days or weeks) test on i.MX board and your test fails, you often wants to know what has happen with a JTAG probe. The problem is when you have 50 boards running in parallel, you don't have the budget to have 50 JTAG debug probe. If you do a "hot plug" of your JTAG probe, you have roughly one chance out 2 to reset your board... so you'll have to wait another couple of hour to resee the problem. Anyway to have a reliable JTAG plug with no reset, it is really simple... cut the RESET line on your cable! then you'll still be able to "attach" to your i.MX. On the MEK board, with a 10-pin JTAG connector, you have the cut the cable line 10 of the ribbon cable: On the cable, cut the reset line like this: With my Lauterbach JTAG  probe, when I do a "hot plug" I never have a reset of my i.MX. BR Vincent
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The Linux L4.14.98_1.0.0_GA; and SDK2.5 for 8QM/8QXP Post GA, SDK2.5.1 for 7ULP GA3 release are now available. Linux on IMX_SW web page, Overview -> BSP Updates and Releases -> Linux L4.14.98_2.0.0 SDK on https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com Files available: Linux:  # Name Description 1 imx-yocto-L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga.zip L4.14.98_2.0.0 for Linux BSP Documentation. Includes Release Notes, User Guide. 2 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX6QPDLSOLOX.zip i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6DualPlus, i.MX 6Dual, i.MX 6DualLite, i.MX 6Solo, i.MX 6Solox Linux Binary Demo Files 3 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX6SLLEVK.zip i.MX 6SLL EVK Linux Binary Demo Files 4 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX6UL7D.zip i.MX 6UltraLite EVK, 7Dual SABRESD, 6ULL EVK Linux Binary Demo Files 5 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX7DSABRESD.zip i.MX 7Dual SABRESD Linux Binary Demo Files  6 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX7ULPEVK.zip i.MX 7ULP EVK Linux Binary Demo Files  7 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX8MMEVK.zip i.MX 8MMini EVK Linux Binary Demo Files  8 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX8MQEVK.zip i.MX 8MQuad EVK Linux Binary Demo files 9 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX8QMMEK.zip i.MX 8QMax MEK Linux Binary Demo files 10 L4.14.98_2.0.0_ga_images_MX8QXPMEK.zip i.MX 8QXPlus MEK Linux Binary Demo files 11 imx-scfw-porting-kit-1.2.tar.gz System Controller Firmware (SCFW) porting kit of L4.14.98_2.0.0 12 imx-aacpcodec-4.4.5.tar.gz Linux AAC Plus Codec v4.4.5 13 VivanteVTK-v6.2.4.p4.1.7.8.tgz Vivante Tool Kit v6.2.4.p4.1.7.8   SDK: On https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/, c lick the Select Development Board , EVK-MCIMX7ULP//MEK-MIMX8QM/MEK-MIMX-8QX to customize the SDK based on your configuration then download the SDK package.  Target board: MX 8 Series MX 8QuadXPlus MEK Board MX 8QuadMax MEK Board MX 8M Quad EVK Board MX 8M Mini EVK Board MX 7 Series MX 7Dual SABRE-SD Board MX 7ULP EVK Board MX 6 Series MX 6QuadPlus SABRE-SD and SABRE-AI Boards MX 6Quad SABRE-SD and SABRE-AI Boards MX 6DualLite SDP SABRE-SD and SABRE-AI Boards MX 6SoloX SABRE-SD and SABRE-AI Boards MX 6UltraLite EVK Board MX 6ULL EVK Board MX 6ULZ EVK Board MX 6SLL EVK Board What’s New/Features: Please consult the Release Notes.   Known issues For known issues and more details please consult the Release Notes.   More information on changes of Yocto, see: README: https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-manifest/tree/README?h=imx-linux-sumo ChangeLog: https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-manifest/tree/ChangeLog?h=imx-linux-sumo#
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The following document contains a list of document, questions and discussions that are relevant in the community based on amount of views. If you are having a problem, doubt or getting started in i.MX processors, you should check the following links to see if your doubt is in there. Yocto Project Freescale Yocto Project main page‌ Yocto Training - HOME‌ i.MX Yocto Project: Frequently Asked Questions‌ Useful bitbake commands‌ Yocto Project Package Management - smart  How to add a new layer and a new recipe in Yocto  Setting up the Eclipse IDE for Yocto Application Development Guide to the .sdcard format  Yocto NFS & TFTP boot  YOCTO project clean  Yocto with a package manager (ex: apt-get)  Yocto Setting the Default Ethernet address and disable DHCP on boot.  i.MX x Building QT for i.MX6  i.MX6/7 DDR Stress Test Tool V3.00  i.MX6DQSDL DDR3 Script Aid  Installing Ubuntu Rootfs on NXP i.MX6 boards  iMX6DQ MAX9286 MIPI CSI2 720P camera surround view solution for Linux BSP i.MX Design&Tool Lists  Simple GPIO Example - quandry  i.MX6 GStreamer-imx Plugins - Tutorial & Example Pipelines  Streaming USB Webcam over Network  Step-by-step: How to setup TI Wilink (WL18xx) with iMX6 Linux 3.10.53  Linux / Kernel Copying Files Between Windows and Linux using PuTTY  Building Linux Kernel  Patch to support uboot logo keep from uboot to kernel for NXP Linux and Android BSP (HDMI, LCD and LVDS)  load kernel from SD card in U-boot  Changing the Kernel configuration for i.MX6 SABRE  Android  The Android Booting process  What is inside the init.rc and what is it used for.  Others How to use qtmultimedia(QML) with Gstreamer 1.0
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The document descript how to use the win32diskimager to create bootable sdcard.  How to resize sdcard mirror rootfs partition. Ex: fsl-image-validation-imx-imx6qpdlsolox.sdcard
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ESAI module in i.MX6D/I.MX6D/I.MX6DL/I.MX6S supports several RESET funtions: Reset ESAI Core, Reset both Transmitter and Receiver, Reset Transmitter individually, Reset Receiver individually, Reset Transmitter FIFO and Reset Receiver FIFO. Below is a simple diagram for these RESET functions, which shows reset object and related register configurations. 1.Reset ESAI Core After setting ESAI_ECT ERST bit to be 1, ESAI core and configuration registers will be reset, but Transmitter and Recevier FIFOs can't be reset by the operation. 2. Reset both Transmitter and Receiver After setting ESAI_PCRC & ESAI_PRRC to be 0x000, Transmitter and Receiver can both be reset, The RESET is also called "Personal Reset" in it's reference manual. About PCRC & PRRC bits functionality, we can see the table: From the table, ESAI_PCRC=0x000 and ESAI_PRRC=0x000 will make ESAI disconnet external ESAI pins, and ESAI's Tranmitter and Receiver can't communicate with external audio codec.  See ESAI_PCRC and ESAI_PRRC register below: ---ESAI_PCRC register ---ESAI_PRRC register There are 12 bits in each register to contorl "DISCONNECTION" OR "CONNECTION" with ESAI pins. So for normal operations of ESAI, these 2 registers can't be changed. 3.Reset Transmitter & Receiver individually By setting ESAI_TCR[TPR]=1, Transmitter can be reset individually, and not affect Receiver. By setting ESAI_RCR[RPR]=1, Receiver can be reset individually, and not affect Transmitter . In reference manual, the reset is called "personal reset / individual reset", actually they means the same thing: --Reset Transmitter individually. --Reset Receiver individually. 4.Reset Transmitter FIFO and Reset Receiver FIFO ---By setting ESAI_TFCR[TFR]=1, Tranmitter FIFIO can be reset. ---By setting ESAI_RFCR[RFR]=1, Receiver FIFO can be reset. The Reset requires ESAI is operational, which means at least one pin is defined as an ESAI pin. NXP TIC team Weidong Sun
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The Linux L4.9.88_2.0.0 Rocko, i.MX7ULP Linux/SDK2.4 RFP(GA) release files are now available. Linux on IMX_SW web page, Overview -> BSP Updates and Releases ->Linux L4.9.88_2.0.0 SDK on https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/ web page.   Files available: Linux:  # Name Description 1 imx-yocto-L4.9.88_2.0.0.tar.gz L4.9.88_2.0.0 for Linux BSP Documentation. Includes Release Notes, User Guide. 2 L4.9.88_2.0.0_images_MX6QPDLSOLOX.tar.gz i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6DualPlus, i.MX 6Dual, i.MX 6DualLite, i.MX 6Solo, i.MX 6Solox Linux Binary Demo Files 3 L4.9.88_2.0.0_images_MX6SLEVK.tar.gz i.MX 6Sololite EVK Linux Binary Demo Files 4 L4.9.88_2.0.0_images_MX6UL7D.tar.gz i.MX 6UltraLite EVK, 7Dual SABRESD, 6ULL EVK Linux Binary Demo Files 5 L4.9.88_2.0.0_images_MX6SLLEVK.tar.gz i.MX 6SLL EVK Linux Binary Demo Files 6 L4.9.88_2.0.0_images_MX8MQ.tar.gz i.MX 8MQuad EVK Linux Binary Demo files 7 L4.9.88_images_MX7ULPEVK.tar.gz i.MX 7ULP EVK Linux Binary Demo Files  8 L4.9.88_2.0.0-ga_mfg-tools.tar.gz Manufacturing Toolkit for Linux L4.9.88_2.0.0 iMX6,7 BSP 9 L4.9.88_2.0.0_mfg-tool_MX8MQ.tar.gz Manufacturing Toolkit for Linux L4.9.88_2.0.0 i.MX8MQ BSP 10 imx-aacpcodec-4.3.5.tar.gz Linux AAC Plus Codec for L4.9.88_2.0.0   SDK:   On https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/, c lick the Select Development Board to customize the SDK based on your configuration then download the SDK package.    Target board: i.MX 6QuadPlus SABRE-SD Board and Platform i.MX 6QuadPlus SABRE-AI Board i.MX 6Quad SABRE-SD Board and Platform i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-SD Board i.MX 6Quad SABRE-AI Board i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-AI Board i.MX 6SoloLite EVK Board i.MX 6SoloX SABRE-SD Board i.MX 6SoloX SABRE-AI Board i.MX 7Dual SABRE-SD Board i.MX 6UltraLite EVK Board i.MX 6ULL EVK Board i.MX 6SLL EVK Board i.MX 7ULP EVK Board i.MX 8MQ EVK Board   What’s New/Features: Please consult the Release Notes.   Known issues For known issues and more details please consult the Release Notes.   More information on changes of Yocto, see: README: https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-manifest/tree/README?h=imx-linux-rocko ChangeLog: https://source.codeaurora.org/external/imx/imx-manifest/tree/ChangeLog?h=imx-linux-rocko
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meta-avs-demos Yocto layer meta-avs-demos   is a Yocto meta layer (complementary to the NXP BSP release for i.MX) published on CodeAurora that includes the additional required packages to support  Amazon's Alexa Voice Services SDK (AVS_SDK) applications. The build procedure is the described on the README.md of the corresponding branch. We have 2 fuctional branches now: imx-alexa-sdk: Support for Morty based i.mx releases imx7d-pico-avs-sdk_4.1.15-1.0.0: legacy support for Jethro releases The master branch is only used to collect manifest files, that used with repo init/sync commands will fetch the whole environment for the 2 special supported boards: i.MX7D Pico Pi and i.MX8M EVK. However the meta-avs-demos can be used with any i.MX board either. Recipes to include Amazon's Alexa Voice Services in your applications. The meta-avs-demos provides the required recipes to build an i.MX image with the support for running Alexa SDK. The imx-alexa-sdk branch is based on Morty and kernel 4.9.X and it supports the next builds: i.MX7D Pico P i i.MX8M EVK Generic i.MX board For the i.MX7D Pico Pi and i.MX8M EVK there is an extended support for additional (external) Sound Cards like: TechNexion VoiceHat: 2Mic Array board with DSPConcepts SW support Synaptics Card: 2 Mic with Sensory WakeWord support The Generic i.MX is for any other regular i.MX board supported on the official NXP BSP releases. Only the default soundcard (embedded) on the board is supported. Sensory wakeword is currently only enabled for those with ARMV7 architecture. To support any external board like the VoiceHat or Synaptics is up to the user to include the additional patches/changes required. Build Instructions Follow the corresponding README file to follow the steps to build an image with Alexa SDK support README-IMX7D-PICOPI.md README-IMX8M-EVK.md README-IMX-GENERIC.md
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NOTE: Always de-power the target board and the aggregator when plugging or unplugging smart sensors from the aggregator. The aggregator portion of the i.MX Power Profiling System sits between the "smart" current sensor boards and the host computer. It provides power and signal connections to each connected sensor board. The communication is done over I2C, where three I2C bus extenders (PCA9518) effectively provide a dedicated bus to each I2C device, to better allow for cabling.  More information will follow... A photo, layout images and schematic attached below.   MBED source for the FRDM-KL25Z is available here: 30848-KL25Z-AGGREGATOR    Smart Sensor Connections At each smart sensor header JP0-JP13, these are the connections provided: 5V: powers the 3.3V regulator on each sensor board 12V: all the gates of all the switching FETs are pulled pulled up to 12V GND: ground connection SCL/TX0: I2C clock line  SDA/RX0:  I2C data line  SWD_CLK:  global line for triggering smart sensors to make measurements RESET_B:  global line for resetting all smart sensor boards SWD_IO_n: individual select line for each smart sensor I2C Bus Connection Three I2C bus extenders  (PCA9518) provide buffered connections between the FRDM board and all the connected smart sensors. The bus extenders were added to allow for longer cables between the aggregator and the smart sensor boards. Each bus extender has five ports and along with connections that allow extending the bus to more bus extenders. Gate Supply The aggregator contains a boost regulator that boost the 5V input from the FRDM board to 12V. The boosted voltage is fed to each of the smart sensor headers. It's used by the smart sensor board to pull up the gates of the switching FETs above any of the rails under test by at least 4.5V in order to benefit from a lower Rds(on). Caution must be exercised with some older FRDM boards since the 5V from the USB connection passes through diodes with a maximum current of 200mA.  The boost regulator and the load presented by the smart sensor boards may exceed the diode's limit and damage it. (Yes, it's happened... two older FRDM-KL25Z boards were used during development. One of them failed with the diode shorted (~0.05 Ohms), so everything kept working. The other failed with a  short of ~45 Ohms, so it kind of worked but not really...) Application Code for Aggregator  To date, application code has only been developed for the FRDM-KL25Z board. The latest application code resides at: https://os.mbed.com/users/r14793/code/30848-KL25Z-AGGREGATOR/, with the latest binary attached below. SWD Programming of Smart Sensors  Connectors J5 and JP15 are provided as an adapter for programming the smart sensor boards via SWD. JP15 provides power to the smart sensor board, since they have no direct 3.3V input for the KL05Z. An SWD programmer (or suitably modified FRDM-KL05Z board) connects to J5. Both connections use 10-pin 0.05"-spaced ribbon cables. Additionally, when a smart sensor is connected to JP15, J6 provides access to the UART pins of the smart sensor (the I2C pins on the smart sensor also mux out the UART of the KL05Z). No hardware changes are necessary at all; changing the code running on the smart sensor is all that's required. In fact, during the initial prototyping of the smart sensors, the serial UART connection was used instead of I2C. Modify Aggregator To Use SWD Dongle To Program Smart Sensor:  Add a wire as shown on the bottom side of the aggregator board as shown below. This ties 3.3V on the aggregator to the debug header, enabling the voltage level translators on the dongle to communicate with the KL05Z on the smart sensor board.  
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NOTE: Always de-power the target board and the aggregator when plugging or unplugging smart sensors from the aggregator. NOTE:  See this link to  instrument a board with a Smart Sensor. Overview The i.MX Power Profiler system consists of one to fourteen "smart" current sensors, an aggregator shield, and a Kinetis FRDM board (the FRDM-KL25 has been used in prototyping but the FRDM-K64F and FRDM-K66F should also be fully compatible). One of the biggest improvements of this system over its preceeding dual-range measurement system is that the microcontroller on each sensor board allows near-simultaneous measurement of all instrumented rails on a board. The dual range profiler has only a single MCU for all sensors, so only one measurement can be made at a time.  It is intended to be used to instrument one to fourteen rails of a target i.MX appliation board. Ideally, the target board will have been designed with a matching/mating power sense footprint for each rail to be measured.  Each smart sensor can sense current in three ranges with three current sense amplifiers. They are "smart" because each sensor board has a Kinetis KL05Z on it to control the switching FETs and to digitize the analog signals (the sense amplifier outputs and the target's power supply rail voltage). A 1% voltage regulator on each smart sensor provides a good voltage reference right next to the KL05Z to ensure better ADC accuracy. Each smart sensor board communicates via I2C. The aggregator shield has three I2C bus extenders (PCA9518) which essentially provide a dedicated I2C bus for each of the connected smart sensors. The FRDM board's I2C is also connected to one of the bus extenders ports. Individual GPIO lines are routed to each smart sensor's connected along with a ganged reset and trigger line for all of the connected smart sensors. A boost regulator generates almost 12V from the FRDM board's 5V supply, which is used for all the switching FETs on the smart sensor boards. The FRDM board's 5V rail is also routed to each smart sensor, which is regulated down to 3.3V locally on each connected smart sensor. Here is a photo of the very first prototypes after moving to 10-pin 0.05" spaced headers and ribbon cables instead of FFC: The smart sensor is intended to mate with through-hole current sense tap points on the target i.MX application board. Three holes spaced at 0.05" each. When not instrumented with sensor, a short needs to be placed across the outer two pins so that the board will function normally. The through hole connections provide physical protection to the target board, keeping traces from getting ripped off. The ground connection in the center provides a reference for meauring the rail voltage on the target board. A partial layout example of the implementation of the current sense footprint is below, where two 0805 shorting resistors in parallel are placed on each side of the holes. The top trace connects to the regulator output and the bottom to the load, usually an i.MX power supply rail. To include the current sense footprint into a board during the design phase, it should be configured as in the following partial schematic:  Every effort should be made to place the feedback on the i.MX side of the sense points so that the regulator compensates for the additional series resistance of the smart sensor, which effectively eliminates the additional series resistance the smart sensor adds. The Feedback should be before the smart sensor if the switching supply won't tolerate the additional series resistance (i.e., output becomes unstable).
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Host TFTP and NFS Configuration Now configure the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server and Networked File System (NFS) server. U-Boot will download the Linux kernel and dtb file using tftp and then the kernel will mount (via NFS) its root file system on the computer hard drive. 1. TFTP Setup   1.1.1 Prepare the TFTP Service   Get the required software if not already set up. On host for TFTP: Install TFTP on Host $ sudo apt-get install tftpd-hpa   (Note: There are a number of examples in various forums, etc, of how to automatically start the TFTP service - but not all are successful on all Linux distro's it seems! The following may work for you.)   Start the tftpd-hpa service automatically by adding a command to /etc/rc.local. $ vi /etc/rc.local   Now, just before the exit 0 line edit below command then Save and Exit. $  service tftpd-hpa start   Now, To control the TFTP service from the command line use: $  service tftpd-hpa restart     To check the status of the TFTP service from the command line use: $  service tftpd-hpa status   1.1.1 Setup the TFTP Directories Now, we have to create the directory which will contain the kernel image and the device tree blob file. $  mkdir -p /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp Then, copy the kernel image and the device tree blob file in this directory. $ cp {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET}/zImage /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp $ cp {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET}/<dtb file> /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp   OR we can use the default directory created by yocto {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET}/ The tftpd-hpa service looks for requested files under /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp The default tftpd-hpa directory may vary with distribution/release, but it is specified in the configuration file: /etc/default/tfptd-hpa . We have to change this default directory with our directory   Edit default tftp directory $ vi /etc/default/tftpd-hpa   Now, change the directory defined as TFTP_DIRECTORY with your host system directory which contains kernel and device tree blob file. Using created directory TFTP_DIRECTORY=” /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/tftp ” OR Using Yocto directory path TFTP_DIRECTORY=” {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/deploy/images/{TARGET} ” Restart the TFTP service if required $  service tftpd-hpa  restart   1.2 NFS Setup 1.2.1 Prepare the NFS Service Get the required software if not already set up. On host for NFS: Install NFS on Host $  sudo  apt-get install nfs-kernel-server The NFS service starts automatically. To control NFS services : $  service nfs-kernel-server restart To check the status of the NFS service from the command line : $  service nfs-k ernel-server status 1.2.2 Setup the NFS Directories Now, we have to create the directory which will contain the root file system. $  mkdir -p / imx -boot/imx6q-sabre/ nfs   Then, copy the rootfs in this directory. $  cp -R {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs/* /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs   OR we can use the default directory created by yocto. $  {YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs 1.2.3 Update NFS Export File The NFS server requires /etc/exports to be configured correctly to access NFS filesystem directory to specific hosts. $ vi /etc/exports Then, edit below line into the opened file. <”YOUR NFS DIRECTORY”> <YOUR BOARD IP>( rw ,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) Ex. If you created custom directory for NFS then, /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs <YOUR BOARD IP>(rw,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) Ex:  /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs 192.168.*.*(rw,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) OR /{YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs <YOUR BOARD IP>(rw,sync,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check)   Now, we need to restart the NFS service. $  service nfs-kernel-server restart   2 Target Setup   We need to set up the network IP address of our target. Power On the board and hit a key to stop the U-Boot from continuing. Set the below parameters, setenv serverip 192.168.0.206        //This must be your Host IP address The path where the rootfs is placed in our host has to be indicated in the U-Boot, Ex. // if you choose default folder created by YOCTO setenv nfsroot /{YOCTO_BUILD_DIR}/tmp/work/{TARGET}-poky-linux-gnueabi/{IMAGE}/1.0-r0/rootfs   OR // if you create custom directory for NFS setenv nfsroot /imx-boot/imx6q-sabre/nfs Now, we have to set kernel image name and device tree blob file name in the u-boot, setenv image < zImage name > setenv fdt_file <dtb file name on host> Now, set the bootargs for the kernel boot, setenv netargs 'setenv bootargs console=${console},${baudrate} ${smp} root=/dev/nfs ip=dhcp nfsroot=${serverip}:${nfsroot},v3,tcp' Use   printenv   command and check  loadaddr and  fdt_addr environment variables variables for I.MX6Q SABRE, loadaddr=0x12000000 fdt_addr=0x18000000   Also, check netboot environment variable. It should be like below, netboot=echo Booting from net ...; run netargs; if test ${ip_dyn} = yes; then setenv get_cmd dhcp; else setenv get_cmd tftp; fi; ${get_cmd} ${image}; if test ${boot_fdt} = yes || test ${boot_fdt} = try; then if ${get_cmd} ${fdt_addr} ${fdt_file}; then bootz ${loadaddr} - ${fdt_addr}; else if test ${boot_fdt} = try; then bootz; else echo WARN: Cannot load the DT; fi; fi; else bootz; fi; Now, set environment variable bootcmd to boot every time from the network, setenv bootcmd run netboot Now finally save those variable in u-boot: saveenv Reset your board; it should now boot from the network: U-Boot 2016.03-imx_v2016.03_4.1.15_2.0.0_ga+ga57b13b (Apr 17 2018 - 17:13:43 +0530)  (..) Net:   FEC [PRIME] Normal Boot Hit any key to stop autoboot:  0   Booting from net ... Using FEC device TFTP from server 192.168.0.206; our IP address is 192.168.3.101 Filename 'zImage'. Load address: 0x12000000 Loading: #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         #################################################################         ###########################################################         2.1 MiB/s done Bytes transferred = 6578216 (646028 hex) Using FEC device TFTP from server 192.168.0.206; our IP address is 192.168.3.101 Filename 'imx6q-sabresd.dtb'. Load address: 0x18000000 Loading: ####         1.8 MiB/s done Bytes transferred = 45893 (b345 hex) Kernel image @ 0x12000000 [ 0x000000 - 0x646028 ] ## Flattened Device Tree blob at 18000000   Booting using the fdt blob at 0x18000000   Using Device Tree in place at 18000000, end 1800e344 switch to ldo_bypass mode!   Starting kernel ...
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The i.MX Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 GA release is now available from IMX_SW page . Overview -> BSP Updates and Releases -> Android 8.0.0 Oreo (O8.0.0_1.0.0, 4.9 kernel)   Files available: # Name Description 1 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_docs.tar.gz i.MX Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP Documentation 2 imx-o8.0.0_1.0.0_ga.tar.gz i.MX Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 proprietary surce code for i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6DualPlus, i.MX 6Dual, i.MX 6DualLite, i.MX 6Solo  i.MX 6Sololite, i.MX6SX and i.MX7D 3 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_image_6dqpsabreauto.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE for Automotive Infotainment based on i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, and i.MX 6DualLite 4 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_image_6dqpsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE Platform and SABRE Board based on i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad and i.MX 6DualLite. 5 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_image_6slevk.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP - i.MX 6Sololite evaluation kit. 6 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_image_6sxsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE Board based on i.MX 6SoloX 7 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_image_6sxsabreauto.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE for Automotive infotainment based on i.MX 6SoloX 8 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_image_7dsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android O8.0.0_1.0.0 BSP - SABRE Board based on i.MX 7Dual 9 fsl_aacp_dec_O8.0.0_1.0.0.tar.gz AAC Plus Codec for O8.0.0_1.0.0 10 android_O8.0.0_1.0.0_tools.tar.gz Manufacturing Toolkit and VivanteVTK for O8.0.0_1.0.0   Supported Hardware SoC/Boards: i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6QuadPlus, and i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-SD board and platform i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6QuadPlus, and i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-AI board and platform i.MX 6SoloLite EVK platform i.MX 6SoloX SABRE-SD board and platforms i.MX 6SoloX SABRE-AI board and platforms i.MX 7Dual SABRE-SD board and platform   Changes: Compared to the N7.1.2_2.0.0 release, this release has the following major changes: Upgraded the Android code base from android-7.1.2_r9 to android-8.0.0_r25. Removed the device partition and added the vendor partition. Enabled ION-based gralloc and EGL. Feature: For features please consult the release notes.   Known issues For known issues and more details please consult the Release Notes.
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iMX6DQ TP2854 MIPI CSI2 720P HD-TVI camera surround view solution for Linux BSP.   For iMX6DQ, there are two IPUs, so they can support up to 4 cameras at the same time. But the default BSP can only support up to two cameras at the same time. The attached patch can make the BSP support up to 4 cameras based on 3.14.52 GA 1.1.0 BSP and 4.1.15 GA1.2.0 BSP. The 4 cameras can be: - 1xCSI, 3xMIPI - 2xCSI, 2xMIPI - 4xMIPI For 4xMIPI case, the four cameras should be combined on the single MIPI CSI2 interface, and each camera data should be transfered on a mipi virtual channel. In this patch, we given the example driver for Techpoint TP2854, it was verified working on iMX6DQ SabreAuto board. The input to TP2854 is four 720P30 HD-TVI cameras.   The MIPI CSI2 720P digital camera surround view solution can be found at: iMX6DQ MAX9286 MIPI CSI2 720P camera surround view solution for Linux BSP   The kernel patches: 0001-IPU-update-IPU-capture-driver-to-support-up-to-four-.patch      Updated IPU common code to support up to four cameras.   0002-Remove-the-page-size-align-requirement-for-v4l2-capt.patch      With this patch, the mxc_v4l2_tvin test application can use overlay framebuffer as V4l2 capture buffer directly.   0003-Add-TP2854-support-on-SabreAuto-board-which-can-supp.patch      TP2854 driver.   How to builld the kernel with TP2854 support:       make imx_v7_defconfig       make menuconfig (In this command, you should select the TP2854 driver:             Device Drivers  --->                   <*> Multimedia support  --->                         [*]   V4L platform devices  --->                               <*>   MXC Video For Linux Video Capture                                       MXC Camera/V4L2 PRP Features support  --->                                           <*>Techpoint tp2854 HD CVBS Input support                                           <*>mxc VADC support                                           <*>Select Overlay Rounting (Queue ipu device for overlay library)                                           <*>Pre-processor Encoder library                                           <*>IPU CSI Encoder library)       make zImage       make dtbs   The built out image file:       arch/arm/boot/dts/imx6q-sabreauto.dtb       arch/arm/boot/zImage "mxc_v4l2_tvin_3.14.52.zip" is the test application, test command to capture the four cameras and render on 1080P HDMI display: /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 0 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 0 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 1 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 0 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 2 -g2d & /mxc_v4l2_tvin.out -ol 960 -ot 540 -ow 960 -oh 540 -d 1 -x 3 -g2d & Details for TP2854, please contact with Techpoint. [2019-04-04] Update Add application to preview + encode at the same time:    /mxc_vpu_test.out -E "-x 0 -o /enc.h264 -w 1280 -h 720 -L 0 -T 0 -W 512 -H 384 -c 5000 -f 2" The camera input data go through CSI->MEM path, and IDMAC 0/1 will convert data from YUV422 ro NV12 for VPU encoder, no resize. Another modification in the mxc_vpu_test, it use different thread to encode and preview.
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The i.MX Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 GA release is now available on IMX_SW page .   Files available: # Name Description 1 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_docs.tar.gz i.MX Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP Documentation 2 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_source.tar.gz Source Code of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP (4.1 kernel) for i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6DualPlus, i.MX 6Dual, i.MX 6DualLite, i.MX 6Solo i.MX 6Sololite, i.MX6SX and i.MX7D 3 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_image_6dqpsabreauto.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP - SABRE for Automotive Infotainment based on i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad, and i.MX 6DualLite 4 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_image_6dqpsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP - SABRE Platform and SABRE Board based on i.MX 6QuadPlus, i.MX 6Quad and i.MX 6DualLite. 5 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_image_6slevk.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP - i.MX 6Sololite evaluation kit. 6 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_image_6sxsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP - SABRE Board based on i.MX 6SoloX 7 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_image_6sxsabreauto.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP - SABRE for Automotive infotainment based on i.MX 6SoloX 8 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_image_7dsabresd.tar.gz Binary Demo Files of Android N7.1.2_2.0.0 BSP - SABRE Board based on i.MX 7Dual 9 fsl_aacp_dec.tar.gz AAC Plus Codec for N7.1.2_2.0.0 10 android_N7.1.2_2.0.0_tools.tar.gz Manufacturing Toolkit and VivanteVTK for N7.1.2_2.0.0   Supported Hardware SoC/Boards: i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6QuadPlus, and i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-SD board and platform i.MX 6Quad, i.MX 6QuadPlus, and i.MX 6DualLite SABRE-AI board and platform i.MX 6SoloLite EVK platform i.MX 6SoloX SABRE-SD board and platforms i.MX 6SoloX SABRE-AI board and platforms i.MX 7Dual SABRE-SD board and platform   Changes: Compared to the N7.1.1_1.0.0 release, this release has the following major changes: Upgraded the Android code base from android-7.1.1_r13 to android-7.1.2_r9. Upgraded U-Boot from v2015.04 to v2017.03. Upgraded the kernel from v4.1.15 to v4.9.17. Upgraded the GPU driver from 6.2.0.p2 to 6.2.2.p1. Upgraded the Wi-Fi BCMDHD release version to 1.141.100.6. Refine the Gralloc and HWC HAL. Enable the GPT partition to replace the MBR partition.   Feature: For features please consult the release notes.   Known issues For known issues and more details please consult the Release Notes.
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Hi everyone, Can I stream video at some different resolutions at the same time using I.Mx6? Thank you.
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Wayland:   Wayland is a display SERVER and COMPOSITION protocol. It is relatively new, as its first release was in 2012. The protocol enables applications to allocate their own off-screen buffers and render their window contents directly, using hardware accelerated libraries like OpenGL ES, or high quality software implementations like Cairo. Wayland is ONLY a display server protocol, not a display server itself. Weston is the reference Wayland protocol implementation.   YOCTO Setup . $ mkdir ~/bin $ curl http://commondatastorage.googleapis.com/git-repo-downloads/repo > ~/bin/repo $ chmod a+x ~/bin/repo $ export PATH=~/bin:$PATH $ git config --global user.name "Your Name" $ git config --global user.email "Your Email" $ git config –list $ mkdir fsl-release-bsp $ cd fsl-release-bsp $ repo init -u git://git.freescale.com/imx/fsl-arm-yocto-bsp.git -b imx-3.14.52-1.1.0_ga $ repo sync     you will be able to build Yocto and also have all the recipes to do so, we need to add WAYLAND, then execute the following steps: $ DISTRO=fsl-imx-wayland MACHINE=imx6qsabresd source fsl-setup-release.sh -b build-wayland $ bitbake fsl-image-gui After these steps, you will have a wayland based i.MX6Q image where you will be able to play with all the knowledge we provided here.   Once your image has been properly generated, you will find the Weston source codes in: <YOUR YOCTODIR>/build-wayland/tmp/work/cortexa9hf-vfp-neon-mx6qdl-poky-linux-gnueabi/weston/1.9.0-r0/weston-1.9.0     Wayland application for extended desktop: This functionality is only supported using the GAL2D blitter, in order to enable a multiple desktop approach, you need to pass the following parameters to your weston command: /etc/init.d/weston stop echo 0 > /sys/class/graphics/fb4/blank weston --tty=1 --use-gal2d=1 --use-gl=0 --device=/dev/fb0,/dev/fb4 &     Xwayland: Wayland is a complete window system in itself, but even so, if we're migrating away from X, it makes sense to have a good backwards compatibility story. With a few changes, the Xorg server can be modified to use wayland input devices for input and forward either the root window or individual top-level windows as wayland surfaces.   DISTRO=fsl-imx-xwayland MACHINE=imx6qsabresd source ./fsl-setup-release.sh -b build-xwayland bitbake fsl-image-gui Once you have the image your Wayland/Weston image will be able to run X11 applications   Excepting X11 applications that use EGL, we don’t support that, if you plan to use EGL apps, please use the Wayland provided functions to create the buffer.   Application for rotation: Weston allows rotating windows with super-key + middle mouse button. As this works for Wayland clients only, you can run Xwayland in weston, run your X application on Xwayland, and rotate the Xwayland display. For another option: Create a file ~/.config/weston.ini with this content: [core] modules=xwayland.so shell=desktop-shell.so idle-time=0 [shell] background-color=0xff002244 locking=false # panel-location=none    [launcher] icon=/usr/share/icons/gnome/24x24/apps/utilities-terminal.png path=/usr/bin/weston-terminal [launcher] icon=/usr/share/icons/hicolor/48x48/apps/firefox.png path=/usr/bin/firefox [output] name=X1 mode=640x800 transform=90 # wanna get mad? use: transform=flipped-270 scale=1 This weston.ini enables a rootless xwayland.so in weston. The [output] section with name=X1 defines weston's appearance as X client. transform=90 rotates the weston display.   the [launcher] sections can be used to create custom panel starters for your X applications. See   /usr/share/doc/weston/examples/weston.ini for more detailed information for further cases, I will attach in the future.
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