Wireless Connectivity Knowledge Base

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Wireless Connectivity Knowledge Base

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The Thread Low Power End Device is preconfigured to have both the MCU in low power state and the radio turned off most of the time to preserve battery life. The device wakes up periodically and polls its parent router for data addressed to it or optionally initiates sending data to the network by means of the parent router. The low-power module (LPM) from the connectivity framework simplifies the process of putting a Kinetis-based wireless network node into the low-power or sleep modes. For the MKW41Z there are six low-power modes available. By default, the Thread Low Power End Device uses Deep sleep mode 3, where: MCU in LLS3 mode. Link layers remain idle. RAM is retained. The wake-up sources are: GPIO (push buttons). DCDC power switch (In buck mode). LPTMR with the 32kHz oscillator as clock source. The LPTMR timer is also used to measure the time that the MCU spends in deep sleep to synchronize low-power timers at wake-up. See the Connectivity Framework Reference Manual and PWR_Configuration.h for more information about the sleep deep modes. To change the polling time on deep sleep mode 3, we need to understand two macros:    1. The cPWR_DeepSleepDurationMs macro in \framework\LowPower\Interface\MKW41Z\PWR_Configuration.h. #ifndef cPWR_DeepSleepDurationMs   #define cPWR_DeepSleepDurationMs                3000 #endif ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ This macro determines how long the MCU will go to low power mode (deep sleep). The maximum value is 65535000 ms (18.2 h). 2. The THR_SED_POLLING_INTERVAL_MS macro in \source\config.h. /*! The default value for sleepy end device (SED) polling interval */ #ifndef THR_SED_POLLING_INTERVAL_MS     #define THR_SED_POLLING_INTERVAL_MS                     3000     /* Milliseconds */ #endif ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ This macro determines how often the Low Power End Device will send a poll message to its parent. NOTE: This value does not determine how often the MCU wakes up. The polling interval should be a multiple of the Deep sleep duration value, otherwise the poll will be sent at the next deep sleep time out. As an example, let's say we configure the polling interval to 4000ms and the deep sleep duration to 3000ms. The MCU will wake up every 3000ms but the poll message will be sent every 2 deep sleep timeouts = 6000ms because the timers are synchronized when the MCU wakes up. The following figure shows the behavior of this example. It is recommended that the polling interval is the same as the deep sleep duration, so the MCU doesn't wake up unnecessarily. The following figure shows this behavior. Another macro to keep in mind is THR_SED_TIMEOUT_PERIOD_SEC in app_thread_config.h. #ifndef THR_SED_TIMEOUT_PERIOD_SEC     #define THR_SED_TIMEOUT_PERIOD_SEC                 ((4*THR_SED_POLLING_INTERVAL_MS)/1000 + 3) #endif ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ This value is the timeout period used by the parent to consider a sleepy end device (SED) disconnected. By default, this value is configured to be 4 times the polling interval + 3s. It is recommended to leave this macro as it is. This value is sent to the parent node during the commissioning.
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General summary MCUBOOT, fsci_bootloader and otap_bootloader are 3 different bootloader applications that can be used depending on the use case. The MCU Flashloader is a separate implementation but it's also mentioned to avoid misunderstanding.   MCUBOOT The MCU bootloader provides support for multiple communication protocols (UART, SPI, I2C, CAN) and multiple applications to interface with it. Summary: - It's a configurable flash programming utility that operates over a serial connection on several Kinetis MCUs. - Host-side command line (blhost) and GUI tools are available to communicate with the bootloader.  -  By default, application starts at address 0xa000. - MCU Bootloader|NXP website - MCU Bootloader Reference Manual - MCU Bootloader Demo Application User's Guide   fsci_bootloader Framework Serial Connectivity Interface ( FSCI) is an NXP propietary protocol that allows interfacing the Kinetis protocol stack with a host system or PC tool using a serial communication interface . The FSCI bootloader enables the FSCI module to communicate with the PC and transfer the image using the FSCI protocol. Summary: - It relies on the FSCI protocol to transfer the binary from a PC connected via UART, using a python and C applications. - To enter into bootloader mode (in FRDM-KW41Z), hold SW1 (Reset) and press SW4, then release SW1 first and SW4 second . Please refer to demo user's guide to get the specific steps for your platform. - By default, application starts at 0x4000. - FSCI Bootloader Manual   otap_bootloader The Connectivity SDK contains Over-the-Air firmware upgrade examples. The OTAP bootloader loads an image obtained from wireless communication, the OTAP bootloader only enters after an image was successfully transferred to the client device (internal or external flash). Summary: - It's used by over the air programmed devices. - The bootloader mode only enters if a flag is set after reset triggered by a successful reception of an image over the air. - By default, application starts at 0x4000. - Kinetis Thread Stack Over-the-Air (OTA) Firmware Update User’s Guide   mcu_flashloader The MCU flashloader is a specific implementation of the MCU bootloader. For the flashloader implementation, the MCU bootloader command interface is packaged as an executable that is loaded from flash and executed from RAM. This configuration allows the user application to be placed at the beginning of the on-chip flash where it is automatically launched upon boot from flash. Using the MCU flashloader to program a user application to the beginning of the flash makes this implementation of the bootloader a one-time programming aid. The MCU flashloader doesn't allow to jump to a different section after a timeout or button press like the other bootloaders, it's main purpose is to flash an application without the need of an external debugger, mainly used for factory programming. Summary: - It is pre-programmed into many Kinetis flash devices during manufacturing and enables flash programming without the need for a debugger. - After the user application is programmed into flash memory, the Kinetis flashloader is no longer available. - Documentation: Getting Started with the MCU Flashloader   You can select from the MCU Bootloader, FSCI_Bootloader and OTAP Bootloader, depending on your needs. JC
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Hello all, let me share a video demonstration of the Thread Smart Home model. See the link below: Thread Smart Home model Best regards, Karel
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802.15.4 wireless sniffers like the USB-KW41Z are capable of capturing over-the-air traffic. The captured packets are passed to a network protocol decoder like Wireshark over a network interface tunnel built by the Kinetis Protocol Analyzer.   Hardware  One USB-KW41Z preloaded with sniffer firmware ( instructions found at www.nxp.com/usb-kw41z )  Software Download & Install Thread Wireshark from wireshark.org which is an open-source network protocol analyzer capable of debugging over the air communication between Thread devices. Kinetis Protocol Analyzer is a software that provides a bridge between the USB-KW41 and Wireshark.  Wireshark Configuration  Open Wireshark from the Program Files Click Edit and select Preferences  Click Protocols to expand a list of protocols Select IEEE 802.15.4, click the Decryption Keys Edit... button Create a new key entry by pressing the plus button, then set the following values and click OK       Decryption key = 00112233445566778899aabbccddeeff      Decryption key index = 1      Key hash = Thread hash Find CoAP and configure it with CoAP UDP port number = 5683 Click Thread and select Decode CoAP for Thread  with Thread sequence counter = 00000000 as shown below At the 6LoWPAN preferences, add the Context 0 value of fd00:0db8::/64 Click OK and close Wireshark Configure Kinetis Protocol Analyzer  Connect the USB-KW41Z to one of the USB ports on your computer Open the device manager and look for the device connected port Open the "Kinetis Protocol Analyzer Adapter" program Make sure, you have a USB-KW41Z connected to your PC when opening the program because the Kinetis Protocol Adapter will start looking for kinetis sniffer hardware. Once the USB-KW41Z is detected, the previously identify COM port will be displayed Select the desired IEEE 802.15.4 channel to scan in the Kinetis Protocol Analyzer window. This guide selects channel 12 as an example  Click on the Wireshark icon to open Wireshark Network Protocol Analyzer An error may appear while opening Wireshark, click OK and continue Wireshark Sniffing Wireshark Network Analyzer will be opened. On the "Capture" option of the main window, select the Local Area Connection that was created by the Kinetis Protocol Analyzer, in this example, Kinetis Protocol Analyzer created "Local Area Connection 2", then click "Start" button. USB-KW41Z will start to sniff and upcoming data will be displayed in the "Capture" window of the Wireshark Network Protocol Analyzer.
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High level description to enable a Linux + KW41Z Border Router. Similar to how it’s shown for the K64 solution in the Kinetis Thread Stack Application Development Guide.   Configure the OpenWrt router to assign the IPv6 ULA prefix 2001:2002:2003::/48. On the LAN network, the router distributes addresses from range 2001:2002:2003::/60 Plug an Ethernet cable between the OpenWrt router and the Linux box. Before creating the Thread network, the Linux box has a global address on its eth interface from range 2001:2002:2003::/60. After creating the Thread network, the BR configures on its Serial TAP interface an address from range 2001:2002:2003::/60. On its 6LoWPAN interface, the BR configures an address from range 2001:2002:2003:c::/64. This is achieved with DHCPv6 prefix delegation - the router is requested to assign a new prefix space to be used by the Thread network. The forth segment in the IPv6 range might be 2, 4, 8 or c, depending of the number of DHCP-PD requests made to the router. After 4 attempts, the router will not lease any other prefixes for some time. In order to force that, you'd require to restart the odhcpd deamon in the OpenWrt router with the following command: /etc/init.d/odhcpd restart . Join the router eligible device, which configures an address in 2001:2002:2003::1/60. We then ping the "Internet" (the LAN interface on the OpenWrt router) and it works. “threadtap0” interface must be bridged with an uplink interface connected to an OpenWrt DHCPv6-PD enabled router; it will act identically as the K64F solution.   Setup Linux PC (Ubuntu) OpenWrt AP/Router with DHCPv6-PD support (OpenWrt version used in this guide: OpenWrt Chaos Calmer 15.05.1) For reference, hardware used on this guide:  TP-Link Model TL-WR741ND 150Mbps Wireless N Router OpenWRT firmware supports multiple hardware available at https://openwrt.org/ 1 FRDM-KW41Z (Host Controlled Device, connected to Linux) 1 FRDM-KW41Z (Router Eligible Device or any joiner device) Thread version 1.1.1.20 (from SDK builder at mcuxpresso.nxp.com)   Host Controlled Device firmware, make sure the following macros are enabled : THR_SERIAL_TUN_ROUTER                       /source/config.h     -> Enables TAP interface by default (not TUN) THR_SERIAL_TUN_ENABLE_ND_HOST     /app/common/app_serial_tun.h   OpenWRT router Configure IPv6 ULA-Prefix:   Linux Copy HSDK folder Create 'threadtap0' TAP interface: …/host_sdk/hsdk/demo#    sudo bash make_tap.sh Use "Thread_Shell" or modify “Thread_KW_Tun” demo to enable the SERIAL_TAP macro …/host_sdk/hsdk/demo#   nano Thread_KW_Tun.c #define SERIAL_TAP 0   modify to:  #define SERIAL_TAP  1         Note : For demo purposes, the "Thread_Shell" demo is recommended, it already uses TAP by default and allows input commands. If this is not required and only the TAP bridge is to be used, use the Thread_KW_Tun demo. Bridge the interfaces; assuming eno1 is the interface connected directly to OpenWrt: # brctl addbr br0 # brctl addif br0 eno1 # brctl addif br0 threadtap0 # ifconfig br0 up Note : (Optional) Addresses on the bridged interfaces are lost and need to be reconfigured on the actual bridge. In this example, after bridging eno1 (interface to OpenWrt router), you’d have to run #dhclient br0 to get an IPv4 address on br0 for SSH to the router and/or #dhclient -6 br0 to get an IPv6 address to the br0 interface. There's a note here https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Network_bridge#With_bridge-utils  about this.   Build C demos …/host_sdk/hsdk/demo#    make Run Thread_Shell or Thread_KW_Tun demo. …/host_sdk/hsdk/demo#    sudo ./bin/Thread_Shell /dev/ttyACM0 threadtap0 25 or …/host_sdk/hsdk/demo#    sudo ./bin/Thread_KW_Tun /dev/ttyACM0 threadtap0         Note: Try to run the demo without parameters to get some help on the input parameters   ifconfig Thread_Shell demo Thread_KW_Tun demo Joiner FRDM-KW41Z (shell) Join the Thread network Verify IP addresses Ping Eth LAN interface on OpenWrt router to verify “Internet” connectivity  Regards, JC
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This patch fixes some minor issues with the Connectivity Software v1.0.2 when working with the Kinetis BLE Toolbox application for smartphones. Following issues are fixed. BLE OTAP Application: Fixes application failing to download the new image when the previous image upload has been interrupted due a disconnection. BLE Wireless UART: Fixes MTU exchange issue causing some characters not bein shown in the smartphone application in iOS and Android. Hybrid BLE + Thread console: Fixes MTU exchange issue causing some characters not bein shown in the smartphone application console in iOS and Android. Make sure the Connectivity Software version 1.0.2 is installed in your computer before proceeding to install this application.
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The SMAC & IEEE 802.15.4 protocol stacks are a KSDK add-on, therefore you need the installation of the KSDK 1.2 before installing these connectivity stacks. Install the Kinetis SDK 1.2: Software Development Kit for Kinetis MCUs|Freescale After installing the KSDK 1.2, download the desired protocol stack. The connectivity software for this platform can be found in the board webpage, in the downloads tab: Modular Reference Boards for Kinetis KW0x|Freescale The installation window will guide you through an easy way to install the software. Best regards, Luis Burgos.
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The connectivity software is an add-on of the Kinetis SDK, therefore the demos are referenced to a KSDK path variable named "KSDK_PATH" in IAR. The KSDK_PATH variable contains the path of the installation folder for the KSDK version in your PC. Taking as an example the MRB-KW01 SMAC Connectivity Software, we can realize that this variable is used to reference for libraries. In particular, this SMAC software for the MRB-KW01 works with KSDK 1.2, that is why you could have troubles if the variable is referenced to another KSDK version (for example KSDK 1.1). Follow the next steps to modify the KSDK_PATH variable in your computer: 1. Right click on "computer", then click "properties" 2. A Control Panel window will be opened. Click on "Advanced system settings" 3. A system Properties windows will be opened. Select the "Advanced" tab, then click "Environment Variables". 4. Select the KSDK_PATH variable and assure that it stores the correct path needed for your project. In case that you need to modify the variable, then click "Edit" 5. Finally click "Ok" to close all tabs and you will be able to run your connectivity software without problems. Best regards, Luis Burgos.
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Certification is the process of testing radio hardware to demonstrate that it meets the stated regulations in the country that it will operate in. A certification is needed generally when electronic hardware will be sold in a country, the certification requirements of that country must be met. If you require changes in your certificated hardware that will affects your RF performance, then you need to re-certificate the device. Most common regions and certification's institutes are (it applies for 2.4GHz & SubGHz): FCC for USA IC for Canada ETSI (CE) for Europe ARIB for Japan Other countries generally follow FCC or ETSI standars. The institute in charge of certifications depends on the region. It's the same institute to certificate your device in 2.4GHz or SubGHz in a certain region, the only difference are the articles of each institute to operate in the different frequencies. For operating in the 2.4GHZ band (worldwide): - In the U.S, CFR 47 FCC Part 15 203, 15.209 and 15.247 - In Canada, IC RSS-210 which closely follows FCC Part 15 - In EU, ETSI EN 300, 301 - In Japan, ARIB STD-T66 For SubGHz depends on the frequency you want to operate in. Taking Japan as an example: In Japan you can operate in the 920MHz band or in the 400MHz band for SubGHz. For both frequencies, ARIB is the institute in charge of the certifications but to operate in the 400MHz band the article that you will need is the ARIB STD-T67, and to operate in the 920MHz you will need to certificate your hardware with ARIB STD-T108 article. Freescale's MRB-KW019032 is certificated to operate in the following SubGHz ISM bands: The firmware used to certificate our KW products is the Radio Utility or the Connectivity Test, it allows the user in changing some RF parameters needed to pass the certification process. If you are thinking in certificate a product, contact an expert! There are Telecommunication Certification Body (TCB) companies which can give you guidance in the processes you need to follow to achieve a certification. To know more about FCC certification requirements and processes, refer to the reference manual “ Freescale IEEE 802.15.4 / ZigBee Node RF Evaluation and Test Guidelines ” in the Freescale's website. Best regards, Burgos. This document was generated from the following discussion: Certifications
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KW01 demo code for 315/434MHz application is ready. The demo code located in the "software Development Tools" FXTH87|Tire Pressure Monitor Sensor|Freescale
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Sniffing is the process of capturing any information from the surrounding environment. In this process, addressing or any other information is ignored, and no interpretation is given to the received data. Freescale provides both means and hardware to create devices capable of performing this kind of operation. For example, a KW01 board can be easily turned into a Sub-GHz sniffer using Test Tool 12.2.0 which can be found at https://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/download/license.jsp?colCode=TESTTOOL_SETUP&appType=file2&location=null&DOWNLOAD_ID=null After downloading and installing Test Tool 12.2.0 there are several easy steps to create your own sniffer for Sub-GHz bands. 1) How to download the sniffer image file onto KW01.      a) Connect KW01 to PC using the mini-usb cable      b) Connect the J-Link to the PC      c) Open Test Tool 12.2 and go to the Firmware Loaders tab      d) Select Kinetis Firmware Loader. A new tab will pop-up.      e) J-Link will appear under the J-Link devices tab.      f) Select the KW01Z128_Sniffer.srec file and press the upload button.     g) From the Development Board Option menu select KW01Z128.      h) Follow the on-screen instruction and unplug the board. Then plug it back in.      i) Close the Kinetis Firmware Loader tab and open the Protocol Analyzer Tab 2) How to use the Protocol Analyzer feature. Basics.     a) The Protocol Analyzer should automatically detect the KW01 sniffer. If not, close the tab, unplug the board, plug it back and re-open the tab. If this doesn’t work, try restarting Test Tool.     b) To start “sniffing” the desired channel, click the arrow down button from Devices: KW01 (COMx) Off and select the desired mode and channel.     c) The tab will change to ON meaning that KW01 will "sniff" on the specified channel. To select another channel, click the tab again and it will switch back to Off. Then select a new channel.      d) Regarding other configurations, please note that you can specify what decoding will be applied to the received data. Additional information: The sniffer image found in Test Tool is compiled for the 920-928MHz frequency band. Because of this, the present document will have attached to it two sniffer images, for the 863-870MHz and the 902-928MHz frequency bands. To upload a custom image perform the steps described at the beginning of this document, but instead of selecting a *.srec file from the list in Kinetis Firmware Loader click the Browse button and locate the file on disk. After selecting it, redo the steps for uploading an image file. A potential outcome: sometimes, if you load a different frequency band sniffer image, the Protocol Analyzer will display the previously used frequency band. To fix this, close Test Tool, re-open it and go to the Protocol Analyzer tab again. The new frequency band should be displayed. More information on this topic can be found in Test Tool User Guide (..\Freescale\Test Tool 12\Documentation\TTUG.pdf), under Chapter 5 (Protocol Analyzer, page 87).
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