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  NXP offers FW update code as part of the SW6705.   PN7160 is typically delivered with the initial FW 12.50.05. To ensure full reliable functionality, it is highly recommended to update the FW on 12.50.09 (or latest). The FW update might be also helpful if you need to restore the default EEPROM settings.  The FW source data are inside the sFWudpate folder.  phDnldNfc_UpdateSeq.c -> FW Version 12.50.05 phDnldNfc_UpdateSeq_12_50_09.c -> FW Version 12.50.09 The phDnldNfc_UpdateSeq.c is executed, which means what is inside of this "C" file is pushed to the PN7160 EEPROM.  So, if you want to update from 12.50.05 to 12.50.09. You need to copy content from phDnldNfc_UpdateSeq_12_50_09.c to The phDnldNfc_UpdateSeq.c.  Also, make sure that the content in phDnldNfc_UpdateSeq_12_50_09.c is commended.   Once that's done, you can debug the code.  Then you can check the progress in "Terminal"   
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Extended NFC Factory Test Application includes:  Get Current value (current measurement in mA) DPC Check (Available from FW. Version 12.50.06) Get AGC Value  Get AGC Value NFCLD (AGC value reading with fixed NFC Level Detector level)   How to get it:  Just download the app from Github. Replace the "NfcFactoryTestApp.c" with the file which is here in the attachment.  Run the application as described in ->AN13287.
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DISCLAIMER APPLICABLE TO THIS DOCUMENT CONTENTS: This post contains a guide of how to use i.MXRT1050 demoboard with other NXP demoboards to demonstrate Secure access to industrial IOT, using NFC, embedded secure element and MCU (see picture below). A ready to use package including preparation of a secure element, and of a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card can be used as 3-step authentication example using symmetric AES keys; a session key will be generated inside SE050 which will be exported to i.MXRT1050 which will handle contactless communication thru CLRC663 plus frontend. This document is structured as follows: Hardware Requirements: Following hardware is required to run the project: i.MXRT1050 EVKB development board plus referred TFT LCD Display BLE-NFC-V2 arduino-friendly board. OM-SE050ARD, embedded secure element arduino-friendly R3 board.   1. Overview of i.MXRT1050 EVKB: The i.MXRT1050 EVKB development board provides the ideal platform for evaluation of and development with the i.MX RT1050 crossover processor, featuring NXP’s advanced implementation of the Arm ® Cortex ® -M7 core. The i.MX RT1050 EVK is a 4-layer through-hole USB-powered PCB. The board includes a high performance onboard debug probe, audio subsystem and accelerometer, with several options for adding off-the-shelf add-on boards for networking, sensors, display and other interfaces. This core operates at speeds up to 600 MHz to provide high CPU performance and best real-time response. Support for Amazon FreeRTOS ™ available within the MCUXpresso SDK.The i.MX RT1050 EVK board is now supported by Arm ® Mbed ™ OS and Zephyr ™ OS, both open source embedded operating systems for developing the Internet of Things. i.MXRT1050 EVKB board supported devices Processors and Microcontrollers i.MX RT Series i.MX-RT1050 : i.MX RT1050 Crossover Processor with Arm ® Cortex ® -M7 core Sensors 6-Axis FXOS8700CQ : Digital Motion Sensor - 3D Accelerometer (±2g/±4g/±8g) + 3D Magnetometer Interfaces USB PD-PHY and CC-Logic PTN5110 : USB PD TCPC PHY IC Power Management Load Switches NX3P190UK : Logic controlled high-side power switch NX5P3090UK : USB PD and type C current-limited power switch The i.MXRT1050 EVKB is fully supported by the MCUXpresso suite of tools, which provides device drivers, middleware and examples to allow rapid development, plus configuration tools and an optional free IDE. MCUXpresso software is compatible with tools from popular tool vendors such as Arm and IAR, and the i.MXRT1050 EVKB may also be used with the popular debug probes available from SEGGER and P&E Micro.   As final touch to this demonstrator, one LCD display will be added in order to show "access control" check result when approaching a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card to the Reader antenna, without the use of a computer console.Connection between i.MXRT1050 EVKB board and LCD Display requires attachment of two flat cables, one for touch-screeen functionality and the other for controlling Display itself.   Click here to order Touchscreen LCD Display thru buy direct:                                          P/N: RK043FN02H-CT 12NC:935358709598   2. BLE-NFC-V2: It is easier to use the BLE-NFC-V2 board due to four Arduino compliant male connectors. Current version has only double row-male connectors which imposes that BLE-NFC-V2 board will be the last board stacked on top of other arduino boards. The following figure shows the pin mapping between the two boards.   Pin Function i.MXRT1050  (Arduino connector # - Pin #) CLRC663 plus NFC BLE V2 (Arduino connector # - Pin #) MOSI J24-5 MOSI J10-P14 MISO J24-4 MISO J10-P12 SPI CLK J24-6 SCK J10-P10 SPI CS J24-3 SSEL J10-P16 RESET J22-6 CLRCL_NRST J12-P6 IRQ J22-5 IRQ J12-P8 IFSEL0 J24-7 GND IF0 Via R11 IFSEL1 J25-4 VCC IF1 Via R9 GND J25-6 GND GND J11-P11   Connections between i.MXRT1050 EVKB Board and NFC BLE V2   3 OM-SE050ARD: SE050 Arduino ® Compatible Development Kit The OM-SE050ARD is the flexible and easy-to-use development kit for the EdgeLock™ SE050 Plug & Trust product family. It can be used in various ways for example via the Arduino interface compatible to any board featuring an Arduino compatible header, including many i.MX, LPC and Kinetis ® boards, or via a direct I 2 C connection. This kit allows evaluation of the SE050 product family features and simplifies the development of secure IoT applications. More information can be found in the respective Application Note AN12395. Preparing hardware for "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo" at i.MXRT1050 EVKB   Reworking i.MXRT1050 EVKB: It is necessary to short circuit 4 empty resistor pads: R278, R279, R280 and R281 – they connect SPI from i.MX1050 until Arduino SPI pads, which will be used by NFC BLE V2 board.   Reworking NFC-BLE V2 board: It is necessary to cut at least one male pin to avoid conflict with OM-SE050ARD board (better would be to cut first 2 pins):   Configuring OM-SE050ARD board jumpers:     Final HW configuration of these three boards altogether: Since NFC BLE V2 has only male connectors, OMSE050ARD board is first connected to i.MX1050 EVKB, then NFC BLE V2 is plugged on top of this latest pcb.       Running "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo" at i.MXRT1050 EVKB:   If this is the first time you’re using i.MXRT1050 EVKB board, follow this link  i.MXRT1050 board overview . Make sure to install the SDK package for i.MXRT1050 EVKB which is required for the project below to run. Download the following zip package Access_RT_v_1_0_18092019.zip. This file is split in two parts and includes 3 functionalities in one MCUxpresso project: Preparation of MFDFEV2 card The touch screen display will offer three functionalities. By default, the first screen will be "Authenticate" functionality. When you choose the arrow to the right, you'll find TAB with word START, that you'll touch when you need to prepare a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card with suitable application and AES keys used for demonstrator. Just place a virgin card on top of Reader antenna, and press "START" button and check with Terminal on MCUxpresso to check sequence of actions to personalize one DESFire EV2 card. You may also use Teraterm to monitor the execution of DESFire card personalization, by inspecting the COM number used by i.MXRT1050 board.     Preparation of SE050 with proper keys    When you choose the arrow to the left once, you'll find TAB with word Authenticate; if you do it again, then you'll the word "START", which you will touch when you need to prepare a virgin OM-SE050ARD demoboardcard with suitable application and AES keys used for demonstrator. Just press "START" button and check with Terminal on MCUxpresso to check sequence of actions to personalize one SE050 board. You may also use Teraterm to monitor the execution of SE050 key provisioning, by inspecting the COM number used by i.MXRT1050 board. After steps 2.a and 2.b have been done to obtain preparation of one Secure element as well as preparation of one MIFARE DESFire EV2 card, then select using < and > keys the Default Display menu, containing word "Authenticate" : just place DESFire EV2 card on top of NFC antenna and press "Authenticate". If the DESFire EV2 card is the one you have personalized, you'll see a Locker icon that will show "Open locker" , that is "Access granted action". If you place other cards, "Locker icon"will stay closed, that is "Access denied". Again, use MCUxpresso Terminal or use Teraterm to monitor the execution of DESFire EV2 authentication steps with SE050 by inspecting the COM number used by i.MXRT1050 board. Available Resources: Application Note Secure Access to Industrial IoT: https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN12569.pdf  Quick start guide to integration of SE050 with i.MXRT1050 https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN12450.pdf i.MXRT1050 EVKB i.MX RT1050 Evaluation Kit | NXP  BLE-NFC-V2 https://www.nxp.com/products/identification-security/rfid/nfc-hf/nfc-readers/clrc663-iplus-i-and-qn902x-nfc-bluetooth-low-energy-solution-for-consumer-applications:BLE-NFC SE050: www.nxp.com/SE050 Porting guidelines of P&T MW to other non-NXP MCU's:  https://community.nxp.com/t5/Secure-Authentication/Does-the-EdgeLock-SE050-Plug-Trust-middleware-support-non-NXP/m-p/1686723#M1305  https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN12448.pdf  In the attachment area, you'll find:  one bundle zip file split in 2 files: Access RT...zip001.zip and ....zip001.zip. download both files, unzip them in one laptop directory, then you may re-zip them and import in MCUxpresso. They include draft of all three functionalities of secure access to industrial iot hands-on: DESFire EV2 card preparation, SE050 trust provisioning (with keys) and authentication of card with current installed SE050.
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DISCLAIMER APPLICABLE TO THIS DOCUMENT CONTENTS:   This post contains a guide of how to use LPC55S69 demoboard with other NXP demoboards to demonstrate Access control using NFC, one embedded secure element and an MCU (see picture below). A ready to use package including preparation of a secure element, and of a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card can be used as 3-step authentication example using symmetric AES keys; a session key will be generated inside SE050 which will be exported to LPC55S69 which will handle contactless communication thru CLRC663 plus frontend.   This document is structured as follows: Hardware Requirements: Following hardware is required to run the project: LPC55S69-EVK development board. OM-SE050ARD development board. CLEV6630B board or BLE-NFC-V2 board. 1. Overview of LPC55S69-EVK: The LPCXpresso55S69 development board provides the ideal platform for evaluation of and development with the LPC55S6x MCU based on the Arm® Cortex®-M33 architecture. The board includes a high performance onboard debug probe, audio subsystem and accelerometer, with several options for adding off-the-shelf add-on boards for networking, sensors, displays and other interfaces. The LPCXpresso55S69 is fully supported by the MCUXpresso suite of tools, which provides device drivers, middleware and examples to allow rapid development, plus configuration tools and an optional free IDE. MCUXpresso software is compatible with tools from popular tool vendors such as Arm and IAR, and the LPCXpresso55S69 may also be used with the popular debug probes available from SEGGER and P&E Micro.   2. Overview of OM-SE050ARD demoboard: The OM-SE050ARD is the flexible and easy-to-use development kit for the EdgeLock SE050 Plug & Trust product family. It can be used in various ways for example via the Arduino interface compatible to any board featuring an Arduino compatible header, including many i.MX, LPC and Kinetis boards, or via a direct I 2 C connection. This kit allows evaluation of the SE050 product family features and simplifies the development of secure IoT applications. More information can be found in the respective Application Note AN12395.   2.1 Connections between OM-SE050ARD and LPC55S69 EVK   OM-SE050ARD LPC55S69 (Conn.# - Pin #) Port Function Name SE_SDA (J22-1) P24-6 also P17-3 PIO1_21 FC4_I2C_SDA_ARD SE_SCL (J22-4) P24-5 also P17-1 PIO1_20 FC4_I2C_SCL_ARD +5V_PC (J22-2)     VDD_TARGET GND (J22-3)     GND 2.2 Jumper settings on OM-SE050ARD to connect it to LPC55S69 EVK Connect SE050 to LPC55S Arduino stackable headers and change jumper J14 as: This connects SE_VDD directly to 3V3 and bypasses enable signal. This is required because enable pin on LPC55S coincides with Silex-2401 SPI pins so we cannot use SE_EN signal to drive SE_VDD.   3. Overview of NFC Front end boards working with LPC55S69 EVK board for this example:   3.1 BLE-NFC-V2: It is easier to use the BLE-NFC-V2 board since less changes have to made on the board as compared to the CLEV6630B board. The following figure shows the pin mapping between the two boards. It is advisable to add a pull-up resistor (4k7 to VCC) on CLRC663 plus signal IRQ.   3.2 CLEV6630B board: The CLEV6630B board consists of CLRC663 plus (NFC frontend) connected by default to an LPC1769 µC via SPI. However, the board is made in such a way that the LPC1769 MCU can be bypassed to connect to an external MCU (in our case the LPC55S69) easily. For doing so: Six resistors from the board need to be removed. These are highlighted in red in the Figure 1: Use the SPI pin connectors available on the left-hand side, on the board edge to connect to external MCU (LPC55S69 in this case) Solder jumper wires onto the following pins of CLEV6630B Board:  GND IRQ CLRC_NRST SSEL MOSI MISO SCK IF0 IF1          The CLEV6630B is shown in Figure 2 after the required changes have been made to it (Removal of resistors and soldering of wires).   Now connect the two boards as follows: Signal function LPC55S69 (conn. # - Pin #) Port CLEV6630B MOSI P17-10 PIO0_20 MOSI MISO P17-12 PIO0_19 MISO SPI SCK P17-14 PIO0_21 SCK SPI CSEL P17-6 PIO1_11 SSEL RESET P18-11 PIO0_15 CLRCL_NRST IRQ P18-3 PIO1_10 IRQ GND P17-7   GND  As final touch to this demonstrator, one LCD display will be added in order to show "access control" check result when approaching a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card to the Reader antenna, without the use of a computer console. Connection between LPC55S69 board and LCD Display:   TFT LPC55S69 (Jumper # - Pin #) Port      SPI_CLK D13 (P17-9) PIO1_2      SPI_MISO D12 (P17-11) PIO1_3      SPI_MOSI D11 (P17-13) PIO0_26      SPI_CS_TFT D10 (P17-15) PIO1_1      GPIO_LCD_BL D9 (P17-17) PIO1_5      GPIO_LCD_DC D7 (P18-1) PIO1_9 5V 5V   GND GND     Click here to order 2.8 inch TFT Display from Waveshare: P/N: 2.8 inch TFT Touch Shield Brand       4. Running "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo" at LPC55S69:   If this is the first time you’re using LPC55S69-EVK board, follow the getting started guide first à  LPC55S69-EVK | NXP . Make sure to install the SDK package for LPC55S69-EVKboard which is required for the project below to run. Download the ‘demobinaries.zip' package which you will find attached to this post. This zip file contains 2 bin files: ex_prepareCard.bin - upload this binary file to LPC55S69 when you need to prepare a MIFARE DESFire EV2 card with suitable application and AES keys used for demonstrator. Upload bin file to LPC55S69 by using MCUxpresso. Just place a virgin card on top of Reader antenna, and reset MCU board by clicking on "RESET KEY" push button. ex_prepareSe050.bin - upload this binary file to LPC55S69 when you need to prepare a new SE050 with suitable AES keys to be used in this demo. Just  upload binary using MCUxpresso; connect a virgin OM-SE050ARD on LPC55S69 arduino connectors, connect micro USB connector to MCU board, and reset MCU by clicking "RESET KEY". After steps 2.1 and 2.2 have been done to obtain preparation of one Secure element as well as preparation of one MIFARE DESFire EV2 card, then upload the next bin file to LPC55S69 using MCUxpresso: ex_Ev2Auth_se05x.bin Alternatively, you can import the whole project in your MCUxpresso environment. Download the file EmbeddedWorld2019DemoLatest.zip at end of this page. Import this zip file project in MCUxpresso environment Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: PICTURE TO BE UPDATED MCUXPRESSO PICTURE TO BE UPDATED The project should be running now. The project contains a closed loop that tries to check presence of a card on top of Reader. Here is how the output looks like in LCD Display. Press the button reset, and you will see the text "Secure Access to Industrial IOT demo 2019" PICTURE TO BE UPDATED Then press the button "Wake-up". Afterwards NFC reader will enter in a loop in which he will look for a card to authenticate. If there are no cards, he will soon show the red allert with text "Access denied" Bring any NFC card near the frontend’s antenna (or in presence of no card) LCD display will show a message in RED "ACCESS DENIED". PICTURE TO BE UPDATED Only in case the "prepared DESFire EV2" card is placed on top of reader, in the picture below, we can see message in GREEN "ACCESS GRANTED" PICTURE TO BE UPDATED.     Available Resources: Porting NFC Reader Library to i.MX RT1050. (Detailed Description of porting) https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-341843 LPC55S69 https://www.nxp.com/products/processors-and-microcontrollers/arm-based-processors-and-mcus/lpc-cortex-m-mcus/lpc5500-cortex-m33/lpcxpresso55s69-development-board:LPC55S69-EVK BLE-NFC-V2 https://www.nxp.com/products/identification-security/rfid/nfc-hf/nfc-readers/clrc663-iplus-i-and-qn902x-nfc-bluetooth-low-energy-solution-for-consumer-applications:BLE-NFC CLEV6630B Product Information|NXP  SE050: www.nxp.com/SE050
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NXP Reader Library is a software written in C language enabling the customers to create their own software stack for their contactless reader. The reader library supports the reader frontend ICs namely PN5180, CLRC663, PN5190 and reader NFC controllers namely PN7462AU, PN7640.   This document describes the structure on NFC reader library. After that, two examples are given on how to modify the software to match read and write NDEF messages. The description is based on NXP NFC Reader Library version 07.09.00, on PNEV7642A board.   1  NFC reader library introduction   NXP Reader Library is classified into following layer, each layer is independent from the other layers, each layer is used as an entry point for immediate upper layer.   Application layer (AL) Protocol abstraction layer (PAL) Hardware abstraction layer (HAL) Bus abstraction layer (BAL)      Below is a full picture of the NFC reader library      The reader library source code structure is as below picture shows,     Comps – components, source files of all included components (abstraction layers) Intfs  - interfaces .  header files of all included components. Types  - Types.   Global macros for general use as well as configuration.    1.1 Application layer (AL) This layer contains application specific implementations for various contactless cards, includes MIFARE DESFire, MIFARE DESFIRE EV2, MIFARE Plus, MIFARE Plus EV1, MIFARE Classic etc.       The application layer contains four main packages: -Card command sets and the NFC Forum Tag Type Operations ---MIFARE Classic Ultralight, DESFire, Felica, Jewel, ICode ---phalTop provides an API to complete NDEF related operations on top of the four NFC Forum Type Tags -NFC Activity: ---Discovery Loop -Host Card Emulation: ---Type 4A Tag -P2P Package: ---LLCP ---SNEP   1.2 Protocol abstraction layer (PAL) The protocol abstraction layer implements the activation and exchange operations regarding the protocol of the contactless communication. The NXP Reader Library supports following ISO standards protocols ISO/IEC14443-3A, ISO/IEC1443-3B, ISO/IEC14443-4, ISO/IEC14443-4A, MIFARE, ISO/IEC15693, ISO18000-3M1, ISO/IEC18000-3M3, ISO/IEC18092, Felica,     1.3 Hardware abstraction layer (HAL) The hardware abstraction layer implements the hardware specific elements of the reader chip, and abstract them to a generic interface.       1.4 Bus abstraction layer (BAL) The bus abstraction layer ensures correct communication interface between the master device and the reader chip, includes SPI, I2C, I3C, UART…   2 Reader Library customization   2.1  port to other MCU Layer structure of the NXP Reader Library is modular and multi-layered architecture.  If you want to port the reader library to other MCU, what you need to do is change the phDriver. phDriver is the abstraction of the board, of the MCU.     phDriver includes GPIO, Timer Abstraction Layer and BAL (Bus Abstraction Layer).   GPIO: it is for IRQ, Reset or other control signals. Timer: it is crucial for any timing relevant tasks, RTOS user timers, they care about everything, so porting timers is very important. BAL: interface between MCU and NFC Front-End (SPI, I2C, I3C, UART…),  we have to initialize SPI or I2C.     2.2 Read NDEF handling Exercise 1: Read the NDEF message of your ICODE DNA tag Process: check if the found Tag is technology V config the TOP AL to T5T check if a NDEF container is present check if I can read the message read the NDEF message please see the attached source code for more details   2.3 write NDEF handling Exercise 2: Write the same message onto one MIFARE DESFire tag. Process: 1 check if the found tag is Type-A 2 check if it is a T4AT by masking the SAK 3 set TOP AL config to T4T 4 check if it is NDEF formatted 5 write NDEF message      
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The PN5180 offers a low-power card detection (LPCD) feature, which allows to power down the reader for a certain period of time to safe the energy. After this time the reader must become active again to poll for the cards. If no card has been detected, the reader can go back to the power down state. PN5180 LPCD cycle time includes standby time and VBAT time. In a normal case, standby time is 200ms (user can define it),   standby current is 15uA, VBATON current is 7500uA, FieldON current: 200mA.  Average current is about 200uA, it depends on your settings and application.   This article describes how to configure PN5180 LPCD using NXP Cockpit Tool and using NXP NFC Reader library.   1  PN5190 LPCD Overview PN5180 LPCD operates in two modes: auto calibration mode and self-calibration mode. Auto calibration mode:  everything done automatically Self-calibration mode:   calibration must be done manually before starting the LPCD.   1.1  Auto Calibration Mode ( 00b) The LPCD calibration is done automatically when the LPCD is started, using the gear and threshold as defined in the EEPROM. This mode always uses the same gear for the LPCD, and is the fast and easiest way to start the LPCD.  It is recommended to choose a gear, which always keeps the ITVDD and field strength limits, so normally, the highest gear number. Auto calibration mode is most commonly used, it is a standard use case. Below parameters need to be configured correctly in EEPROM   LPCD_REFERENCE_VALUE       LPCD_REFVAL_GPO_CONTROL      LPCD_THRESHHOLD  ( 0x37) LPCD wakes up, if current AGC during “ping” > AGC Reference + LPCD_THRESHOLD or< AGC Reference -LPCD_THRESHOLD Minimum LPCD_THRESHOLD = 03…08 (very sensitive) Maximum LPCD_THRESHOLD = 40 … 50 (very robust)    LPCD_FIELD_ON_TIME  (0x36) RF on time in 8µs, excluding the fix time .   Fix time = 62µs 01 => RF on = 70µs 02 => RF on = 78µs 03 => RF on = 86µs 10 => RF on = 190µs   1.2  Self Calibration Mode (01b) The LPCD calibration must be manually triggered, with reading or writing into the AGCREF_CONFIG register.   Reading from this register - without prior writing - starts an LPCD calibration. The calibration is executed using the gear which is resulting from the actual DPC setting under the actual antenna detuning condition. AGC_GEAR is used in the LPCD self-calibration.   Reading from this register - without prior writing - delivers in addition to the AGC_GEAR value the AGC_VALUE. The AGC_VALUE is used in the LPCD self-calibration. Writing to this register: Writing data to this register is required before starting the LPCD in Self-calibration mode. Either the previously read AGC_GEAR or a user-defined gear can be chosen. The previously read AGC_VALUE has to be written in any case. Writing data to this register defines the values for AGC_GEAR without taking the actual detuning condition into account. The value of AGC_GEAR to perform an LPCD calibration which derives the AGC_VALUE. This AGC_VALUE and the AGC_GEAR are used in the LPCD self-calibration.   Self-calibration mode always requires a Read AGC_REF_CONFIG, followed by a write AGC_REF_CONFIG, using the previously read AGC_VALUE.   The LPCD calibration can be done in two different options: Option 1:  Read AGC_REF_CONFIG register:  This command executes a standard RF Field on. So depending on the load condition the DPC adjusts the output power. The final gear is take as gear for the LPCD.  This option guarantees that the maximum output power is taken for the LPCD.   Option 2: Write AGC_REF_CONFIG register: This command executes a LPCD calibration ping with the gear number, as defined in the AGC_REF_CONFIG, bit 10:13. This option allows a flexible use of any of the defined gears for the LPCD.   PN5180 LPCD self-calibrate is executed, using Gear -> AGC_REF_CONFIG (Register) Threshold -> LPCD_THRESHOLD (EEPROM) RF on time-> LPCD_FIELD_ON_TIME (EEPROM)   2  How to configure PN5180 LPCD with Cockpit The NFC Cockpit allows the configuration and test of the low power card detection of the PN5180 as shown in below picture. The LPCD parameter, which are stored in the EEPROM, can be changed and the LPCD can be started. The LPCD tab allows to directly define and write the related EEPROM addresses:   LPCD Gear #: Defines the gear number, which is used for the LPCD in auto calibration mode, stored in addr. 0x34, bit 0:3 Threshold Value: Defines the threshold window, As soon as the AGC value during the LPCD ping exceeds the AGC reference value + threshold window, the IRQ will be raised and the PN5180 wakes up. Field On Time:  Defines the ping length Standby time :  This value defines the time between two pings in ms. FieldOn Current: This value is ITVDD under the loading condition, when RF field is on with the used gear. This value does not have any influence on the LPCD execution, but simply is used to estimate the overall  average current consumption. This current estimation is calculated, when the LPCD is started.         3   How to configure PN5180 LPCD with NXP NFC reader library. The LPCD works in two phases: First the standby phase is controlled by the wake-up counter (timing defined in the instruction), which defines the duration of the standby of the PN5180. Second phase is the detection-phase. The RF field is switched on for a defined time (EEPROM configuration) and then the AGC value is compared to a reference value.   Below is the flow chart for PN5180 LPCD          
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DISCLAIMER APPLICABLE TO THIS DOCUMENT CONTENTS:   PN5190-NTAG 5 boost High Speed Communication Demo This article describes the unique feature of these two chips when interacting with each other at contactless interface: Passthrough demonstrator at high bit rates for ISO 15693 between PN5190 and NTAG5 Boost. Scope of demonstrator: ▪ Demonstrating a unique feature of NXP Semiconductors. High bit rates for ISO15693 communication (212 kbps) between a PN5190 reader IC and an NTAG5 boost plus LPC55S69 host MCU, when implementing passthrough mode using the SRAM of the NTAG5 boost. ▪ Through MCUXpresso console, the user can configure the contactless bit rate (26.4kbps or 212kbps options) as well as the amount of data to exchange using passthrough mode. ▪ Passthrough mode is implemented from NFC reader to LPC side only. ▪ The PN5190 prints on the MCUXpresso console the outcome of the transaction and baud rate achieved. ▪ In order to handle passthrough communication, we are using GPIO interrupt handlers on the NTAG 5 boost + LPC55S69 side and hard coded timeout on the PN5190 + MCU side. Required hardware and software material: Hardware ▪ PNEV5190BP development board ▪ LPCXpresso55S69 Development Board ▪ OM2NTA5332 - NTAG5 boost development kit ▪ 3 x USB micro cables Software ▪ Firmware Source Code for PN5190is attached to this article, containing keywork pn5190: mobileknowledge-nxp-connected-tags-pn5190-2cfb4c59b56e_v1.0.zip ▪ SDK_2.x_FRDM-K82F is already included in bundle mentioned above. ▪ Firmware Source Code for LPCXpresso55S69 is attached to this article, containing keyword lpc55s69: mobileknowledge-nxp-connected-tags-lpc55s69-5f2f9667cc60_v1.1.zip ▪ MCUXpresso IDE recent version (v11.6.0 or newer) Demonstrator bring up: Hardware assembly for LPCXpresso55S69: • Connect NTAG5 Boost board to LPCXpresso55S69 • Make sure SW6 is on position 2-3 to enable 5V power on tag side. • Connect LPCXpresso55S69 board to your computer (Debug Link Input). • No additional power source is needed. Hardware assembly for PNEV5190B: • Connect two USB micro cables to PNEV5190B board for power, flashing firmware and UART connection • Red LED indicates power is enabled • Green LED debugging/UART status Software loading on LPC55S69: Import “lpcxpresso55s69_ntag5_passthrough_nolib” project to MCUXpresso IDE • Install SDK_2_12_0_LPCXpresso55S69. SDK can be downloaded from • https://www.nxp.com/security/login?service=https%3A%2F%2Fmcuxpresso.nxp.com%2Flogin%2F  • Build project and flash a binary file using GUI Flash Tool. After flashing, reboot your board. Blue LED must be enabled which means tag is waiting for field to be detected. Under MCUXpresso: 1. Import project from file system 2. Select lpcxpresso55s69 project 3. Uncheck copy projects into workspace Software loading on PNEV5190B: • Unzip the “PN5190_NTAG5boost_Passthrough.zip” folder. • Import all projects inside “PN5190_NTAG5boost_Passthrough” to MCUXpresso IDE • Install SDK_2.x_FRDM-K82F. Such SDK is included in project file tree: • nxp-connected-tags-pn5190\Platform\SDK_2.x_FRDM-K82F • Build project and flash a binary file using GUI Flash Tool. After flashing, reboot your board. Blue LED must be enabled which means reader is waiting for NTAG5 to be detected. • Start Debug session to see available bitrate options on the console. Under MCUXpresso: 1. Import project from file system 2. Select all the projects 3. Uncheck copy projects into workspace LED User Interface Specifications (same for LPCXpresso55S69 an PNEV5190B) • Steady blue - waiting for Tag - discovery loop, • Blinking green - passthrough transfer ongoing • Steady green - all data transferred successfully. • Steady red - error - tag lost during transfer. Menu options when two boards have NFC antennas facing each other: Two options of bitrate are available for transfer amount of data from host to NTAG5 Boost: ▪  standard 26.4 kbps or ▪  highest bit rate 212 kbps It is possible to configure amount of data to be exchanged between PN5190 and NTAG 5 boost: ▪1KByte ▪2KBytes ▪10KBytes Demonstration flow: Once one of these option is selected, reader is ready to detect a tag. ▪ When tag is detected, reader configures selected bitrate and starts data exchange. ▪ Blinking green LED indicates transfer ongoing and the console shows a progress. Here are some results of transaction at the different bit rates and data sizes offered by this demonstrator: Data Size (Bytes) Selected bitrate (kbps) Result Bitrate (kbps) Transfer time (ms) 1024 26.4 2.8 357 1024 212 12.35 81 2048 26.4 2.8 714 2048 212 12.42 161 10240 26.4 2.7 3569 10240 212 12.41 806   High speed demo user manual can be also find attached to this article: 22-10-11 NXP - Connected Tags demonstrator User Manual.pdf Conclusions: This demonstrator HW & SW can show that high speed interaction can be achieved between PN5190 (NFC Front end) and NTAG 5 boost, making use of available commands described in product support package. Disclaimer: All SW available here is aimed only for evaluation purposes and NXP disclaims any direct or indirect liability damages, since referred SW bundles are not official part of PN5190/NTAG 5 boost standard product support packages available in nxp.com.  
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AN13189 provides guidelines for the integration of PN7160 NXP NCI-based NFC controller to an Android platform from software perspective. But some developers found some compile issues when integrating PN7160 NFC package into Android 11.   This article describes how to fix the build error when you integrating PN7160 NXP NCI-based NFC controller to Android 11 system.  You need to follow the AN13189 (PN7160 Android porting guide ) first.  After you run the installation script install_NFC.sh, the following modification should be added to the source code. 1) Open package/apps/Nfc/nci/jni/Android.bp Add  "-DNXP_EXTNS=TRUE",   2 )  open system/nfc/src/Android.bp Add   "-DNXP_EXTNS=TRUE",     3 )   open packages/apps/Nfc/src/com/android/nfc/NfcService.java And add this: between isNfcSecureEnabled and setNfcSecure methods:             @Override         public IBinder getNfcAdapterVendorInterface(String vendor) {             if(vendor.equalsIgnoreCase("nxp")){                     return (IBinder) mNfcAdapter;             } else {                    return null;             }         }     Next, follow AN13189, complete the following steps in section 4.2. Then you can build the package successfully.  Thanks  @andraz_skupek .      
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Using an alternative clock source to set up PN7462's contact interface clock , so that we have more options of the clock frequency.
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The code is based on the application note https://www.nxp.com.cn/docs/en/application-note/AN12657.pdf. It mostly shows how to communicate between LPC1769 and RC663 via SPI based on board CLEV6630B without library and which Register have to be set to send a REQA (NTAG21x).
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Demo for Originality Signature Verification(AN11350)
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--The document consists of the following: Step 1. Connections And Firmware Version Step 2. Updating FW On PC Windows 10 Step 3. Updating FW On VMplayer16.0 + Ubuntu 20.04 Step 4. Updating FW On i.MX8MN-EVK With Embedded L5.4.70_2.3.0 BSP Step 5. Confirming whether update is successful using cockpit4.8 --About Cockpit There are several different versions of cockpit, and each version can only recognize the same version of firmware. --Reference Materials 1.https://community.nxp.com/t5/NFC/Mounting-the-PN7462AU-in-the-USB-downloader-mode-under-Linux/m-p/800939 2.https://community.nxp.com/t5/NFC/PN7462-updating-EEPROM-on-linux/m-p/739808/highlight/true#M3144       NXP CAS-TIC team Weidong Sun 04-15-2021  
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     This document mainly describes how to use NanoNVA tool to do antenna tuning on OM29263ADK with CLEV663B/PN5180B board. Please refer to the application note AN12810(https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/application-note/AN12810.pdf) about the NanoVNA tool. And please refer the user manual UM11098 (https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/user-guide/UM11098.pdf) about OM29263ADK. After setting NanoVNA tool with reference to the above documents. Firstly, take the small antenna of OM29263ADK with CLEV663B as an example. The small antenna can be directly connected and used on the CLEV6630B。the antenna board can be directly connected to the CLEV6630B without any additional modification, after the original antenna had been removed (cut off).   The result of the antenna tuning with NanoVNA tool as the below:   Second, take the small antenna of OM29263ADK with PN5180B board as an example. Follow the UM11098 steps as the below: (a) the EMC filter cut off frequency must be adjusted, and (b) the DPC and related features should be disabled, since the antenna is asymmetrically tuned and the DPC is not used. (a) The original antenna uses a symmetrical tuning, which uses an EMC filter with L0 = 470nH and C0 = 253pF (220pF + 33pF). The inductor as well as the first part of the capacitance (220pF) are assembled on the main board. To operate the OM29263ADK antenna, the C0 (220pF) on the PNEV5180B must be replaced by a 68pF.   (b) The DPC and its related features should be disabled to operate an asymmetrical antenna.   If can’t get the card information please refer to the AN11740’s related steps to achieve a good sensitivity of RxP/RxN path. The result of the antenna tuning with NanoVNA tool as the below:   The whole process of the small antennas tuning of OM29263ADK with CLEV66B/PN5180 with NanoVNA is completed. PS: It is the similar with the steps for the large antennas tuning of OM29263ADK with CLEV66B/PN5180 with NanoVNA.  
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Please kindly refer to the attachment for details.   Hope that helps,
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A Quick Solution for link issue of "missing --end-group" when you use the latest MCUXpresso IDE to compile the NFC reader library projects.
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Hello NFC enthusiasts, The following topics will be covered in this document: Activation of multiple Tags. For more information, please refer to Activating multiple Tags using NFC Reader Library  Read and Write NDEF messages. Reading values from GPIOs. This document will be segmented into three parts: Description. Software configuration section. Hardware configuration section. Demonstration. Description. The purpose of this project is to copy the information stored from one tag to another by making use of GPIOs to decide which tag to copy from. This way, topics such as read and write NDEF, card activation and GPIOs will be implemented.   Software configuration section: This demonstration is based on NXP NFC Reader Library v05.02.00, NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum project for PNEV7462B, in which some modifications are going to be made in order to carry this out. These tags are compliant with NFC Forum Type 2 Tag and ISO/IEC14443 Type A specifications.    In phacDiscLoop.h modify the max number of cards supported (two cards for this demonstration):   #define PHAC_DISCLOOP_CFG_MAX_CARDS_SUPPORTED 0x02U      In NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.c add the following code in LoadDiscoveryConfiguration():   static phStatus_t LoadDiscoveryConfiguration() { ... /*Passive max typea devices*/ status = phacDiscLoop_SetConfig(pDiscLoop, PHAC_DISCLOOP_CONFIG_TYPEA_DEVICE_LIMIT, 2); CHECK_STATUS(status); }   A fix to the SW stack has to be made (Fix will be implemented in the next release): open "phacDiscLoop_Sw_Int_A.c", line 511, change if statement as below.     if((pDataParams->sTypeATargetInfo.bTotalTagsFound > 1) && ((bTypeATagIdx) < pDataParams->sTypeATargetInfo.bTotalTagsFound))   In NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.c add #include "phhalGpio.h" to local headers section. /* Local headers */ #include <cards.h> #include "phhalGpio.h" #include "NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.h"‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.c define uint16_t NDEFlength = 0 and declare void InitGPIOs(void) in Global Defines section. /******************************************************************************* **   Global Defines *******************************************************************************/ phacDiscLoop_Sw_DataParams_t       * pDiscLoop;       /* Discovery loop component */ void * ppalI18092mPI; void * ppalI18092mT; void * palTop; /* Variables and InitGPIOs() needed for this application */ uint8_t bTagState1; uint8_t* value; uint8_t* value1; uint8_t val,val1; uint16_t NDEFlength = 0;‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ void InitGPIOs(void);‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ in Main Function, initialize the following: /******************************************************************************* **   Main Function *******************************************************************************/ int main (void) {      /* Initialize section */      value=&val;      value1=&val1;      InitGPIOs();‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In case of multiple devices (which is of our interest) add the following code and comment the if(wNumberOfTags > 1){...} section as follows: else if((status & PH_ERR_MASK) == PHAC_DISCLOOP_MULTI_DEVICES_RESOLVED)             {                 /*                  * Multiple cards resolved. It enters here if DEVICE LIMIT > 1 and more than one devices are                  * detected and resolved.                  */                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n Multiple cards resolved: \n");                 /* Get detected technology type */                 status = phacDiscLoop_GetConfig(pDiscLoop, PHAC_DISCLOOP_CONFIG_TECH_DETECTED, &wTagsDetected);                 CHECK_STATUS(status);                 /* Get number of tags detected */                 status = phacDiscLoop_GetConfig(pDiscLoop, PHAC_DISCLOOP_CONFIG_NR_TAGS_FOUND, &wNumberOfTags);                 CHECK_STATUS(status);                 DEBUG_PRINTF ("\tNumber of tags: %d \n",wNumberOfTags);                 /* Tag 1 information */                 DEBUG_PRINTF ("\n Tag 1 NDEF information: \n");                 status = phacDiscLoop_ActivateCard(pDataParams, PHAC_DISCLOOP_TECH_TYPE_A, 0x00);                 /* Check for NDEF presence */                 status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState1);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                 status = ReadNdefMessage(PHAL_TOP_TAG_TYPE_T2T_TAG);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                 /* Tag 2 information */                 DEBUG_PRINTF ("\n Tag 2 NDEF information: \n");                 status = phacDiscLoop_ActivateCard(pDataParams, PHAC_DISCLOOP_TECH_TYPE_A, 0x01);                 /* Check for NDEF presence */                 status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState1);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                 status = ReadNdefMessage(PHAL_TOP_TAG_TYPE_T2T_TAG);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- \n\n");                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n Options: \n\n");                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n 1.- Left button  -(X)-( )- To copy NDEF message from Tag 1 to Tag 2 \n\n");                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n 2.- Right button -( )-(X)- To copy NDEF message from Tag 2 to Tag 1 \n\n");                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- \n\n");                 /* Reading values from GPIOs 2 and 3 */                 do                 {                     phhalPcr_GetGpioVal(2,value);                     phhalPcr_GetGpioVal(3,value1);                 }while(*value==1 && *value1==1);                 /* Copy NDEF content from tag at index 0 to Tag at index 1*/                 if(*value==0 && *value1==1)                 {                      DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n Copy NDEF from Tag 1 to Tag 2 \n");                 status = phacDiscLoop_ActivateCard(pDataParams, PHAC_DISCLOOP_TECH_TYPE_A, 0x00);                 /* Check for NDEF presence */                 status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState1);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                 status = ReadNdefMessage(PHAL_TOP_TAG_TYPE_T2T_TAG);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                 status = phacDiscLoop_ActivateCard(pDataParams, PHAC_DISCLOOP_TECH_TYPE_A, 0x01);                 /* Check for NDEF presence */                 status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState1);                 DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                     if(bTagState1 == PHAL_TOP_STATE_READWRITE)                     {                     status = WriteNdefMessage(PHAL_TOP_TAG_TYPE_T2T_TAG);                     DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                     }                     DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n NDEF from Tag 1 to Tag 2 already copied \n");                 }                 /* Copy NDEF content from tag at index 1 to Tag at index 0*/                 else if(*value==1 && *value1==0)                 {                      DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n Copy NDEF from Tag 2 to Tag 1 \n");                     /* Check for NDEF presence */                     status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState1);                     status = ReadNdefMessage(PHAL_TOP_TAG_TYPE_T2T_TAG);                     DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                     status = phacDiscLoop_ActivateCard(pDataParams, PHAC_DISCLOOP_TECH_TYPE_A, 0x00);                     /* Check for NDEF presence */                     status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState1);                         if(bTagState1 == PHAL_TOP_STATE_READWRITE)                         {                         status = WriteNdefMessage(PHAL_TOP_TAG_TYPE_T2T_TAG);                         DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);                         }                         DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n NDEF from Tag 2 to Tag 1 already copied \n");                 }                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n Please remove the tags \n\n");                 DEBUG_PRINTF (" \n Press any button to continue... \n\n");                                 /* Reading values from GPIOs 2 and 3 */                 do                 {                     phhalPcr_GetGpioVal(2,value);                     phhalPcr_GetGpioVal(3,value1);                 }while(*value==1 && *value1==1); /*                if(wNumberOfTags > 1)                 {                      Get 1st detected tag and activate device at index 0                     for(bIndex = 0; bIndex < PHAC_DISCLOOP_PASS_POLL_MAX_TECHS_SUPPORTED; bIndex++)                     {                         if(PHAC_DISCLOOP_CHECK_ANDMASK(wTagsDetected, (1 << bIndex)))                         {                             DEBUG_PRINTF("\t Activating device @ index 0\n");                             status = phacDiscLoop_ActivateCard(pDataParams, bIndex, 0);                             break;                         }                     }                     if( ((status & PH_ERR_MASK) == PHAC_DISCLOOP_DEVICE_ACTIVATED) ||                             ((status & PH_ERR_MASK) == PHAC_DISCLOOP_PASSIVE_TARGET_ACTIVATED))                     {                          Get detected technology type                         status = phacDiscLoop_GetConfig(pDiscLoop, PHAC_DISCLOOP_CONFIG_TECH_DETECTED, &wTagsDetected);                         CHECK_STATUS(status);                         GetTagInfo(pDataParams, 0x01, wTagsDetected);                         DEBUG_PRINTF("\t\t Activation successful\n");                     }                     else                     {                         DEBUG_PRINTF("\t\tCard activation failed\n");                     }                 }*/                 /* Switch to LISTEN mode if supported after POLL mode */             }‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.h declare WriteNdefMessage(). /** * Write NDEF message to a detected tag. * */ phStatus_t WriteNdefMessage(     uint8_t TopTagType);      /* [in] Tag type to which write NDEF */‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.c define the function WriteNdefMessage(). /** * Writes NDEF Message to a tag */ phStatus_t WriteNdefMessage(uint8_t TopTagType) {     phStatus_t status;     uint8_t bTagState;     uint16_t wDataLength = 0;     /* Configure Top layer for specified tag type */     status = phalTop_SetConfig(palTop, PHAL_TOP_CONFIG_TAG_TYPE, TopTagType);     DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);     /* Check for NDEF presence */     status = phalTop_CheckNdef(palTop, &bTagState);     DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);     if(bTagState == PHAL_TOP_STATE_READWRITE)     {         /* Write NDEF message */         status = phalTop_WriteNdef(palTop, baSnepAppBuffer, NDEFlength);         DEBUG_ERROR_PRINT(status);         /* Print NDEF message, if not NULL NDEF */         if(NDEFlength)         {             DEBUG_PRINTF("\tNDEF detected...\n");             DEBUG_PRINTF("\tNDEF length: %d\n", wDataLength);             DEBUG_PRINTF("\tNDEF message:\n");             //DumpBuffer(aData, wDataLength);             DumpBuffer(baSnepAppBuffer, 50);         }         else         {             DEBUG_PRINTF("\tNDEF content is NULL...\n");         }     }     else     {         DEBUG_PRINTF("\tNo NDEF content detected...\n");     }     return status; }‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In NfcrdlibEx3_NFCForum.c define InitGPIOs(). void InitGPIOs(void) {     phhalPcr_ConfigInput(2,true,false,false,false,true,false);     phhalPcr_ConfigInput(3,true,false,false,false,true,false); }‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Hardware configuration section: For the Hardware set up, two push buttons will be connected to GPIO_2 and GPIO_3 of PNEV7462B as follows. Vdd will be connected to 3V3 pin on the board: GND can be connected to any GND on the board. Demonstration: Each tag was previously written with a text NDEF message respectively.   Tag 1: Text: Tag1 Language: en   Tag 2: Text: Tag2 Language: en   Writing to a tag can be done by making use of our TagWriter app available in the play store: NFC TagWriter by NXP - Aplicaciones de Android en Google Play  First both tag's NDEF text messages will be displayed: Once the information is read, you'll be asked to select an option from the following menu: If left button (GPIO_2) is pressed, the content from Tag 1 will be written to Tag 2: Otherwise, If left button (GPIO_3) is pressed, the content from Tag 2 will be written to Tag 1: Please find the modified files attached. I hope this is of great help! Best regards, Ivan.
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Hello NFC community,  as you may know the The PN7462 family consists of 32-bit Arm® Cortex®-M0-based NFC microcontrollers offering high performance and low power consumption. It has a simple instruction set and memory addressing along with a reduced code size compared to existing architectures. PN7462 family offers an all-in-one-solution, with features such as NFC, supporting all NFC Forum modes, microcontroller, optional contact smart card reader, and software in a single chip. It operates at CPU frequencies of up to 20 MHz. and  MIFARE® Ultralight-based tickets offer an ideal solution for low-cost, high-volume applications such as public transport, loyalty cards and event ticketing. They serve as a perfect contactless replacement for magnetic stripe, barcode, or QR-code systems. The introduction of the contactless MIFARE Ultralight® ICs for limited-use applications can lead to reduced system installation and maintenance costs. As you may know the MIFARE family has the Ultralight C tag which is a contactless IC supporting 3DES cryptography is mostly used in limited use applications such smart ticketing, this tag complies with ISO 14443-3 type A and it is defined as type 2 tag. In this document I am going to show you how to modify an example that is provided in the NXP Reader Library to authenticate to a not personalized Mifare Ultralight C and perform a Read operation. Materials: PN7462 or PNEV7462 ( this is the evaluation board  from NXP) PN7462 Reader library Mifare Ultralight C Mifare Ultralight C Data sheet MCUXpresso First we are going to go to  NfcrdlibEx4_MIFAREClassic.c, I am going to explain as much as I can with comments in the code and add some information here we are going to  add the following include: #define MFULC_READ_DATA_SIZE 16 /* Number of bytes that is read by MIFARE Ultralight Read command */ #define MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN 0x04 /* Number of bytes that is read by MIFARE Ultralight Read command */ #define MFULC_PAGE_SIZE 0x04 /* Size of page of MIFARE Ultralight card */ #define KEYCOUNT 0x7FU /* number of keys */ #define KEYVERSIONS 0x01U /* number of key versions */ #define RAND_KEY_2K3DES_ADDRESS 0x01U /* Random 2K3DES key address in keystore */ #define RAND_KEY_2K3DES_VERSION 0x00U /* Random 2K3DES key version in keystore */ #define UL_C_KEY_ADDRESS 0x02U /* Ultralight C key address in keystore */ #define UL_C_KEY_VERSION 0x00U /* Ultralight C key version in keystore */ #define KEY_POSITION 0x00U /* Key position */ ‍ ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ after this in the Global Variable declaration section we will have to add the following: phCryptoSym_Sw_DataParams_t cryptoEnc; /* CryptoSym parameter structure for ENC */ phCryptoSym_Sw_DataParams_t cryptoSymRng; /* CryptoSym parameter structure for SymRng */ phCryptoRng_Sw_DataParams_t cryptoRng; /* CryptoRng parameter structure for Rng */ phKeyStore_Sw_DataParams_t keyStore; /* KeyStore parameter structure */ static uint8_t gaUlcKey[] = {0x49, 0x45, 0x4D, 0x4B, 0x41, 0x45, 0x52, 0x42, 0x21, 0x4E, 0x41, 0x43, 0x55, 0x4F, 0x59, 0x46}; phacDiscLoop_Sw_DataParams_t * pDiscLoop; /* Discovery loop component */ void *psKeyStore; void *psalMFUL; void *ppalMifare;‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ the variable static uint8_t gaUlcKey[] = {0x49, 0x45, 0x4D, 0x4B, 0x41, 0x45, 0x52, 0x42, 0x21, 0x4E, 0x41, 0x43, 0x55, 0x4F, 0x59, 0x46}; this is the key for default in the Mifare Ultralight c as stated in the datasheet section 7.5.6 this is a reference for the key we should be using. Then we are going to change the PAL variables /*PAL variables*/ phKeyStore_Sw_KeyEntry_t aKeyEntry[KEYCOUNT]; phKeyStore_Sw_KeyVersionPair_t aKeyVersion[KEYCOUNT * KEYVERSIONS]; phKeyStore_Sw_KUCEntry_t aKeyUsageCounter[KEYCOUNT]; uint8_t bDataBuffer[DATA_BUFFER_LEN]; /* universal data buffer */ uint8_t bSak; /* SAK card type information */ uint16_t wAtqa; /* ATQA card type information */ ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ then we are going to change this in line 131 psalMFC = phNfcLib_GetDataParams(PH_COMP_AL_MFC);‍‍‍ to psalMFUL = phNfcLib_GetDataParams(PH_COMP_AL_MFUL);‍‍‍ so this get the MIFARE Ultralight AL-Components, then after this line we are going to add  ppalMifare = phNfcLib_GetDataParams(PH_COMP_PAL_MIFARE);‍‍‍  then we are going to erase the Mifare classic  functionality to avoid any kind of error due to Mifare classic not being present in the field.and add the following: First we are going to proceed with the Authentication part, we are going tu use the API phalMful_UlcAuthenticate(pDataParams, wKeyNumber, wKeyVersion);  the first  parameter is the structure pointing to the tag that was activated by the discoveryloop, then the key address and last the  version of the key. as you can see we do not send the key we only tell the tag where is the key stored and the version if it was updated. to ensure the confidentiality of the communication. /* Authenticate with the Key even if no memory of Ultralight Card is restricted by Authentication access Authentication with correct key provides access to any part of the memory (beside key storage) . */ /* Send authentication for entire Ultralight C */ status = phalMful_UlcAuthenticate(psalMFUL, UL_C_KEY_ADDRESS, UL_C_KEY_VERSION); /* Check for Status */ if ((status & PH_ERR_MASK) != PH_ERR_SUCCESS) { /* Print Error info */ DEBUG_PRINTF("\nAuthentication Failed!!!"); DEBUG_PRINTF("\nPlease correct the used key"); DEBUG_PRINTF("\nExecution aborted!!!\n"); break; } DEBUG_PRINTF("\nAuthentication Successful"); /* ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ after this the status should be  OK  and no error found, if you have an error in this please check that the card you are using was not tampered before and changed the key or if you distributor delivered a configured key please be sure to use the correct key. then we are going to proceed to the Read operation: phalMful_Read(pDataParams, bAddress, pData) as you can see  the first parameter is the same as authentication because we are still talking to the same tag,  the MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN its value is 04 this is because as you can see in the datasheet section 7.5 Memory organization the user memory starts in page 4 and ends in page 39 so we just want to read the first page of the tag and the bDataBuffer variable will store the received information. /* *************** READ operation ****************************** */ /* Empty the bDataBuffer */ memset(bDataBuffer, '\0', DATA_BUFFER_LEN); DEBUG_PRINTF("\n\nRead data from page %d, %d, %d, %d", MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN, MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN + 1, MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN + 2, MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN + 3); /* Read data from custom */ status = phalMful_Read(psalMFUL, MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN, bDataBuffer); /* Check for Status */ if (status != PH_ERR_SUCCESS) { /* Print Error info */ DEBUG_PRINTF("\nRead operation failed!!!\n"); DEBUG_PRINTF("\nExecution aborted!!!\n\n"); break; /* Break from the loop*/ } DEBUG_PRINTF("\nRead Success"); DEBUG_PRINTF("\nThe content of page %d is:\n", MFULC_USER_MEMORY_BEGIN); phApp_Print_Buff(&bDataBuffer[0], MFULC_READ_DATA_SIZE);‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ and that is all of our project, this is a simple project but can help a lot of people to understand how to work with Mifare Ultralight C using the PN7462 and then help people to start doing more complex examples based on this project. if you want to know how to configure a Mifare Ultralight c product using our PEGODA reader please check the document I posted called "Mifare Ultralight C - Changing default password and protecting page address". if you have any questions please let me know. BR Jonathan
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The NFC Reader Library is a complete software support library for NFC Frontend ICs. Designed to give developers a faster and simpler way to deliver NFC-enabled products. This multi-layer library, written in C, makes it easy to create NFC based applications. The NFC Reader Library includes a package for K82F. This package can be download from this page. The version used is 05.22.01 - NFC Reader Library for FRDM F82K HW Changes Connecting FRDM_K64F toCLEV6630B Import into MCUXpresso SW Changes (FRDM_K64F) Import the hello_world_demo_apps example Add the source code Basic Discovery Loop Example Link the NFC Reader Library Define FRDM_K64F SDK preprocessor symbols Add include paths Add folder to Source Location Files Modifications phDriver_KinetisSDK.c Board_FRDM_K64FRc663.h BoardSelection.h ph_NxpBuild_App.h phApp_Init.h phApp_Init.c K64 Drivers Demonstration HW Changes The CLEV6630B board has the CLRC663 connected with LPC1760 MCU via SPI. The design of the CLEV6630B makes it very easy to use another MCU, which is what we need to do. To have direct access from FRDM_K64F to CLRC663, this change is needed: the six resistors marked by red squares need to be removed to obtain proper decoupling of the LPC1769 MCU from the CLEV6630B board. Connecting FRDM_K64F to CLEV6630B These are the connections required for this porting: FRDM_K64F pin Connection CLEV6630B pin J2-8 / PTD2 MOSI MOSI J2-10 / PTD3 MISO MISO J2-12 / PTD1 SCK SCK J2-6 / PTD0 SSEL SSEL J1-2 / PTC16 IFSEL0 IF0 J1-4 / PTC17 IFSEL1 IF1 J1-11 / PTC0 IRQ IRQ J1-5 / PTC1 RESET CLRC_NRST J2-14 / GND GND GND Import into MCUXpresso In the Quickstart Panel, click on Import project(s) from file system… Browse the project archive (zip) from your file system. Click Next to select the projects needed (In this example, is just imported the Basic Discovery Loop example). Click on Finish to import the selected ones. The imported projects will appear in the Project Explorer of the workspace. SW Changes (FRDM_K64F) Download and install the K64F SDK from the SDK Builder. Import the hello_world_demo_apps example Click on Import SDK example(s)... Select the frdmk64f. Import the hello_world example and click on Finish. Then we rename the project to frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop. Over this project we are going to apply the changes Add the source code Basic Discovery Loop Example Copy the NfcrdlibEx1_BasicDiscoveryLoop.c to our K64 project. Also copy from the src folder the phApp_Init.c file from NfcrdlibEx1_BasicDiscoveryLoop to frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop source folder. Link the NFC Reader Library We add the DAL, NxpNfcRdLib, phOsal and intfs folders from NfcrdlibEx1_BasicDiscoveryLoop project to thefrdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop project. Right click on the frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop project, click on New>Folder: Click on Advanced, and select Link to alternate location (Link Folder). Click on Browse… browse to your workspace and choose the NxpNfcRdLib folder. Click on Finish. The same procedure has to be done with the DAL, phOsal and intfs folders. The project should appear with the following structure: Define FRDM_K64F SDK preprocessor symbols We need to change the compiler preprocessor configuration. Right click on the frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop Project. Click on Properties.. Go to C/C++ Build>Settings>Tool Settings>MCU C Compiler>Preprocessor The actual symbols are related with the board, but we need to add the related with the Reader Library. These are the symbols we need to add: PHDRIVER_FRDM_K64FRC663_BOARD PH_OSAL_NULLOS NXPBUILD_CUSTOMER_HEADER_INCLUDED Then click on Apply and Close, and Yes. Add include paths After that we add the paths of the folders we recently linked: Right click on the frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop Project. Click on Properties.. Go to C/C++ Build>Settings>Tool Settings>MCU C Compiler>Includes The Include paths should be listed like this: Add folder to Source Location Then we add the root folder to the Path and Symbols: Right click on the frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop Project. Click on Properties.. Go to C/C++ General>Path and Symbols>Source Location Files Modifications phDriver_KinetisSDK.c We need to change some lines in the DAL>KinetisSDK>phDriver_KinetisSDK.c file: GPIO_PortClearInterruptFlags((GPIO_Type *)pGpiosBaseAddr[bPortGpio], bPinNum);‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ bValue = (uint8_t)((GPIO_PortGetInterruptFlags((GPIO_Type *)pGpiosBaseAddr[bGpioNum]) >> bPinNum) & 0x01); bValue = (uint8_t)GPIO_PinRead((GPIO_Type *)pGpiosBaseAddr[bGpioNum], bPinNum);‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ GPIO_PinWrite((GPIO_Type *)pGpiosBaseAddr[bGpioNum], bPinNum, bValue);‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ GPIO_PortClearInterruptFlags((GPIO_Type *)pGpiosBaseAddr[bGpioNum], (1<<bPinNum));‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ These changes are related to the names of the functions in our SDK version (2.7.0). We can erase the Linux, LPCOpen and PN74xxxx folders, we don’t need them for this migration. frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop>DAL>src Also, to avoid multiple definitions issues, we erase the phOsal>src>NullOS>portalble>psOsal_Port_CM3.c file. Board_FRDM_K64FRc663.h The architecture of the NFC Reader Library makes it very simple to be able to use other MCU’s, since you only need to adapt the configuration of the peripheral drivers. To do this, there are some changes required in the DAL (Driver Abstraction Layer) of the Reader Library. In frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop>DAL>boards folder, are some header files with the information of different MCU’s and Readers. We need to add our header file: Board_FRDM_K64FRc663.h We can copy the Board_FRDM_K82FRc663.h, rename and make the needed modifications. BoardSelection.h Then we add the K64 option to the BoardSelection.h header. #ifdef PHDRIVER_FRDM_K64FRC663_BOARD # include <Board_FRDM_K64FRc663.h> #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ ph_NxpBuild_App.h #if defined(PHDRIVER_LPC1769RC663_BOARD) \ || defined(PHDRIVER_FRDM_K82FRC663_BOARD) \ || defined(PHDRIVER_FRDM_K64FRC663_BOARD) # define NXPBUILD__PHHAL_HW_RC663 #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ phApp_Init.h /* Check for K64 controller based boards. */ #if defined(PHDRIVER_FRDM_K64FRC663_BOARD) #define PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ #ifdef PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 # include <fsl_debug_console.h> # include <stdio.h> #endif #ifdef DEBUG #if defined(PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K82) || defined (PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64) #if SDK_DEBUGCONSOLE==1 #define DEBUG_PRINTF DbgConsole_Printf #else #define DEBUG_PRINTF(...) printf(__VA_ARGS__); #endif #else /* PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K82 */ #include <stdio.h> #define DEBUG_PRINTF(...) printf(__VA_ARGS__); fflush(stdout) #endif /* PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K82 */ #else /* DEBUG */ #define DEBUG_PRINTF(...) #endif /* DEBUG */‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ phApp_Init.c Also we to add the FRDM_K64F CPU initialization in phApp_Init.c: #ifdef PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 #include <fsl_port.h> #include <fsl_pit.h> #ifdef DEBUG #include <fsl_clock.h> #endif #endif /* PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 */‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ #ifdef PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 static void phApp_K64_Init(void); #endif /* PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 */‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ #ifdef PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 static void phApp_K64_Init(void) { pit_config_t pitConfig; BOARD_BootClockRUN(); SystemCoreClockUpdate(); PIT_GetDefaultConfig(&pitConfig); PIT_Init(PIT, &pitConfig); BOARD_InitPins(); } #endif /* PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64 */‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ #elif defined(PHDRIVER_KINETIS_K64) phApp_K64_Init();‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ K64 Drivers The hello_world example does not use SPI and PIT drivers, we need to add these drivers to our project: Right click on the frdm_k64f_basic_discovery_loop Project. Click on SDK Management>Manage SDK Components And we add the dspi and pit drivers: Demonstration With all these changes, now we can run the Basic Discovery Loop with the FRDM_K64F and the CLRC663.
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Hello NFC Community,   This document focuses to the configuration of the LPC8N04 to be controlled by the data it receives though the NFC interface. The document is based on the nfc_eeprom project of LPC8N04’s SDK. It will basically be necessary to modify the code within while(1) loop as below.   Get the data from NFC and store it on d_Data buffer:             if (NDEFT2T_GetMessage(g_NdefInstance, g_Data, sizeof(g_Data))) { /* Save NDEF Data into EEPROM */ //Chip_EEPROM_Write(LPC_EEPROM, 0, g_Data, sizeof(g_Data)); }‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Clear respective semaphore and Flag: /** Clear Memory Write Semaphore */ releaseMemSemaphore(); /** Clear Write Flag */ g_TargetWritten = 0;‍‍‍‍‍‍‍   Now that the information is in the g_Data buffer now you may proceed to verify the received data with the one expected to trigger a function e.g., to turn on/off a led.   if(g_Data[7] == 'A') { Led_Set(true); } else if(g_Data[7] == 'B') { Led_Set(false); }‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍     On the other side, it will only be necessary to approach the reader to the LPC8N04's antenna and the NDEFT2T_GetMessage(g_NdefInstance, g_Data, sizeof(g_Data)) function will get the data and store it on the g_data buffer mentioned above. Happy development! BR, Ivan.
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Hello NFC community, The purpose of this document is to show the steps to port the Bluetooth pairing example for NTAG I²C Plus from KW41Z to KW36.  Setup For this, we will work with following boards: 1. Arduino NTAG I²C plus board (OM23221ARD) development kit. 2. KW36 Freedom board.  Download SDK as mentioned in chapter 2.1.3 of KW41Z User Manual and pay close attention to include NTAG I²C middleware. Now, repeat the same procedure above for FRDM KW36, this will be the SDK on which we will be making the modifications for the porting. NOTE: Unlike KW41Z, for KW36 there is no NTAG I²C plus middleware as shown in the image below: Save changes and build the SDK. NTAG I²C middleware will have to be imported from KW41Z's SDK in MCUXPresso. Install the SDK and import hid _device freertos example into the workspace: Copy ntag_i2c_plus_1.0.0 folder from KW41Z workspace to KW36's Open folder properties and uncheck Exclude resources from build, then apply and close. In board.c file add the following code below BOARD_DCDCInit()  /* Init DCDC module */ BOARD_DCDCInit(); #ifdef NTAG_I2C /* Init I2C pins for NTAG communication */ BOARD_InitI2C(); #endif // NTAG_I2C‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In AppIMain.c add the following code in main_task before calling App_Thread()  #ifdef NTAG_I2C /* Initialize I2C for NTAG communication */ HAL_I2C_InitDevice(HAL_I2C_INIT_DEFAULT, I2C_MASTER_CLK_SRC, NTAG_I2C_MASTER_BASEADDR); SystemCoreClockUpdate(); /* Initialize the NTAG I2C components */ ntag_handle = NFC_InitDevice((NTAG_ID_T)0, NTAG_I2C_MASTER_BASEADDR); // HAL_ISR_RegisterCallback((ISR_SOURCE_T)0, ISR_LEVEL_LO, NULL, NULL); #endif // NTAG_I2C‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In ApplMain.c add the following under Public memory declarations /************************************************************************************ ************************************************************************************* * Public memory declarations ************************************************************************************* ************************************************************************************/ ... #ifdef NTAG_I2C NFC_HANDLE_T ntag_handle; // NTAG handle #endif // NTAG_I2C‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Include new headers to the following: In ApplMain.c include the following  #ifdef NTAG_I2C /* NTAG middleware module */ #include "HAL_I2C_driver.h" //#include "HAL_I2C_kinetis_fsl.h" #include <app_ntag.h> #endif //NTAG_I2C‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ In hid_device.c include the following #ifdef NTAG_I2C /* NTAG handler */ #include <app_ntag.h> #endif // NTAG_I2C‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Copy app_ntag.c and app_ntag.h files from KW41Z  workspace to KW36's. The app_ntag.c source file contains sample functions for working with NDEF messages. Function NFC_MsgWrite() creates and writes the NDEF message in the Type-2 Tag format to the NTAG I2C chip through the ntag_i2c_plus middleware. The write algorithm is NFC-Forum compliance. Function NDEF_Pairing_Write() contains a procedure to create a BTSSP record via using the NDEF library. The same is performing function NDEF_Demo_Write() function. Here is shown how to create NDEF multi-record that contains several types of NDEF records. The app_ntag.h header file contains predefined blocks of constants (constant fields of data) that are written to the NTAG I2C chip by default during the communication which requires set the default content to the chip’s registers or erase the NTAG I2C chip user memory and registers of lock bytes. NOTE: Please change the I²C Master base address and I²C Master clock source from I2C1 to I2C0 as below in app_ntag.h: In hid_device.c make the implementation in BleApp_HandleKeys() as below. This is an extension for BLE pairing and writing NDEF messages to NTAG I²C. void BleApp_HandleKeys(key_event_t events) { #ifdef NTAG_I2C uint32_t timeout = NDEF_WRITE_TIMEOUT; // static uint8_t boApplStart = TRUE; switch (events) { case gKBD_EventPressPB1_c: // short press of SW4 { // if (boApplStart) // { /* first time startup */ BleApp_Start(); // boApplStart = FALSE; // } // boNDEFState = TRUE; // pairing via NDEF is allowed in case the apk. is running TurnOffLeds(); /* added to copy the pairing NDEF message to NTAG_I2C chip */ if (NDEF_Demo_Write()) { // report an error during creating and writing the NDEF message LED_RED_ON; } else { // indication of success by orange color on the RGB LED LED_RED_ON; LED_GREEN_ON; } /* Start advertising timer */ TMR_StartLowPowerTimer( mNDEFTimerId, gTmrLowPowerSecondTimer_c, TmrSeconds(timeout), NDEFTimerCallback, NULL); break; } case gKBD_EventPressPB2_c: // short press of SW3 { TurnOffLeds(); /* added to copy the pairing NDEF message to NTAG_I2C chip */ if (NDEF_Pairing_Write()) { // report an error during creating and writing the NDEF message LED_RED_ON; } else { // indication of success by green color on the RGB LED LED_GREEN_ON; } /* Start advertising timer */ TMR_StartLowPowerTimer( mNDEFTimerId, gTmrLowPowerSecondTimer_c, TmrSeconds(timeout), NDEFTimerCallback, NULL); break; } case gKBD_EventLongPB1_c: // long press of SW4 { if (mPeerDeviceId != gInvalidDeviceId_c) { Gap_Disconnect(mPeerDeviceId); boNDEFState = FALSE; } break; } case gKBD_EventLongPB2_c: // long press of SW3 { #if gAppUsePrivacy_d if( mAdvState.advOn ) { mAppPrivacyChangeReq = reqOff_c; /* Stop Advertising Timer*/ TMR_StopTimer(mAdvTimerId); Gap_StopAdvertising(); } else if( gBleSuccess_c == BleConnManager_DisablePrivacy() ) { TMR_StartLowPowerTimer(mPrivacyDisableTimerId, gTmrLowPowerSingleShotMillisTimer_c, TmrSeconds(mPrivacyDisableDurationSec_c), PrivacyEnableTimerCallback, NULL); } #endif break; } default: break; } #else // NTAG_I2C switch (events) { case gKBD_EventPressPB1_c: { BleApp_Start(); break; } case gKBD_EventPressPB2_c: { hidProtocolMode_t protocolMode; /* Toggle Protocol Mode */ Hid_GetProtocolMode(service_hid, &protocolMode); protocolMode = (protocolMode == gHid_BootProtocolMode_c)?gHid_ReportProtocolMode_c:gHid_BootProtocolMode_c; Hid_SetProtocolMode(service_hid, protocolMode); break; } case gKBD_EventLongPB1_c: { if (mPeerDeviceId != gInvalidDeviceId_c) Gap_Disconnect(mPeerDeviceId); break; } case gKBD_EventLongPB2_c: { #if gAppUsePrivacy_d if( mAdvState.advOn ) { mAppPrivacyChangeReq = reqOff_c; /* Stop Advertising Timer*/ TMR_StopTimer(mAdvTimerId); Gap_StopAdvertising(); } else if( gBleSuccess_c == BleConnManager_DisablePrivacy() ) { TMR_StartLowPowerTimer(mPrivacyDisableTimerId, gTmrLowPowerSingleShotMillisTimer_c, TmrSeconds(mPrivacyDisableDurationSec_c), PrivacyEnableTimerCallback, NULL); } #endif break; } default: break; } #endif //NTAG_I2C }‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Add the declaration of the timer handler in Private memory declarations section of hid_device.c  /************************************************************************************ ************************************************************************************* * Private memory declarations ************************************************************************************* ************************************************************************************/ ... #ifdef NTAG_I2C static tmrTimerID_t mNDEFTimerId; static bool boNDEFState = FALSE; #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Add the declaration of the timer callback function in Private functions prototypes of hid_device.c /************************************************************************************ ************************************************************************************* * Private functions prototypes ************************************************************************************* ************************************************************************************/ ... #ifdef NTAG_I2C static void NDEFTimerCallback(void *); #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Allocate / Initialize the timer There are 3 timers used within the HID_device demo application. The NDEF timer is also necessary to allocate in the function BleApp_Config() in the hid_device.c file, at the same place as the common timers are allocated. Function TMR_AllocateTimer() returns timer ID value which is stored in the variable mNDEFTimerId. The timer ID allocation must be added behind the other timer as it is done at following C-code printout /* Allocate application timers */ mAdvTimerId = TMR_AllocateTimer(); mHidDemoTimerId = TMR_AllocateTimer(); mBatteryMeasurementTimerId = TMR_AllocateTimer(); #ifdef NTAG_I2C mNDEFTimerId = TMR_AllocateTimer(); #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Add the timer callback function It is necessary to add the NDEFTimerCallback() function at the end of the hid_device.c file. If NDEF timer counter expires timer is stopped. Then RGB LED is switched off. There is the printout of the call back function at the following lines. #ifdef NTAG_I2C /*! ********************************************************************************* * \brief Handles timer callback for writing NDEF messages * * \param[in] pParam Calback parameters. ********************************************************************************** */ static void NDEFTimerCallback(void * pParam) { /* Stop Advertising Timer*/ TMR_StopTimer(mNDEFTimerId); /* switch off the LED indication */ TurnOffLeds(); } #endif // NTAG_I2C‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Note: Change the size for timer task  in app_preinclude.h file as follows: /* Defines Size for Timer Task*/ #ifdef NTAG_I2C #define gTmrTaskStackSize_c 1024 // changed for the NTAG integration #else #define gTmrTaskStackSize_c 500 #endif‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Security change The sample project for adding NTAG I2C middleware is hid_device and is described in chapter 3.1.1. This project requires to enter the password “999999” during the Bluetooth pairing. From this reason is necessary to decrease the security level to remove the password sequence. Security level is a part of the configuration and is set in the app_config.c file. In this file following parameter must be changed gSecurityMode_1_Level_3_c to the new parameter: gSecurityMode_1_Level_1_c Parameter gSecurityMode_1_Level_3_c is used on several places within the app_config.c file. Use the FIND function (short key is “CTRL+F”) of the IDE to find it and update. There are last two parameters of the gPairingParameters structure which are necessary to change. parameter: .securityModeAndLevel = gSecurityMode_1_Level_3_c, has to be changed to: .securityModeAndLevel = gSecurityMode_1_Level_1_c, parameter: .localIoCapabilities = gIoDisplayOnly_c, has to be changed to: .localIoCapabilities = gIoNone_c, parameter .leSecureConnectionSupported = TRUE, has to be changed to: .leSecureConnectionSupported = FALSE, Symbols Add the following symbols to project settings -> Preprocessor. The ones in red are for integration of ntag_i2c_plus middleware and the one in green is for adding the NDEF library, please see below: Include paths Please add the following includes in project settings. The ones in red are for NTAG I²C Plus middleware and the ones in green for the NDEF Library, please see below: With the previous setup it shall be able to run Bluetooth pairing example as for FRDM-KW41Z. Hope this  helps!
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