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This post contains step by step guide of how to use NTAG 5 with LPC55S69. The goal of this post is to enable developers to use NTAG 5 and LPC55S69 together, quickly and easily.    Attached with this post are two ready to use packages:      'Simple_NDEF’ demonstrates how to read/write to NTAG 5 from the I 2 C  interface and field detection functionality.      'Passthrough’ demonstrates SRAM passthrough functionality, in which NTAG 5 acts as a fast bridge between the I 2 C interface device and RF interface device. NTAG 5 Overview NTAG 5  i s a family of ISO/IEC 15693 and NFC Forum Type 5 Tag compliant tags with an EEPROM, SRAM, and I 2 C  host and slave interface. This ensures information exchange with all NFC Forum Devices with a tap. With this ability, the tag offers a long-reading range and privacy due to close proximity with mobile devices. NXP’s NTAG 5 boost shrinks the NFC footprint while adding AES security, so designers can deliver ultra-compact devices for use in IoT, consumer, and industrial applications. It is an NFC Forum-compliant contactless tag that delivers exceptional read range, giving tiny devices the ability to interact with the cloud, and other NFC-enabled devices, including smartphones. NXP’s NTAG 5 link lets designers of sensor-equipped systems add an NFC interface with a wired host interface that’s configurable as an I 2 C master/slave, a Pulse Width Modulator (PWM), or a General-Purpose I/O (GPIO). Operating at 13.56 MHz, it is an NFC Forum-compliant contactless tag that can be read and written by an NFC-enabled device at close range and by an ISO/IEC 15693-enabled industrial reader over a longer range. Hardware Requirements NTAG 5 Evaluation Board (OM23510ARD)                          OM23510ARD                                     2. LPCXpresso55S69 Board Hardware Connections Connecting the two boards is very easy since both have Arduino compatible headers, so simply plug the NTAG 5 EVK board on top of the LPCXpresso55S69 board.   1. Running 'Simple_NDEF' on LPC55S69 with NTAG 5 If this is the first time you’re using the LPCXpresso55S69 board, follow the getting started guide first LPC55S69-EVK . Make sure to install the SDK package for the LPC55S69 board which is required to run the project. Download the ‘Simple_NDEF’ package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to the “Project Explorer” tab of your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here:https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on the Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: 5. After step 3, the project should be running now. Here is how the output looks in the terminal: 2. Running 'Passthrough' on LPC55S69 with NTAG5 If this is the first time you’re using the LPCXpresso55S69 board, follow the getting started guide first   an   LPC55S69-EVK | NXP. Make sure to install the SDK package for the LPC55S69 board which is required to run the project. Download the ‘Passthrough’ package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to the “Project Explorer” tab of your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here:https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE  Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE (via drag and drop), click on the Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started, click on the run icon to run the code: 5.  After step 3, the project should be running now. To check the passthrough functionality, install the NTAG 5 App and then go into passthrough functionality. Available Resources LPC55S69-EVK: LPCXpresso55S69 Development Board https://www.nxp.com/products/processors-and-microcontrollers/arm-microcontrollers/general-purpose-mcus/lpc5500-cortex-m33/lpcxpresso55s69-development-board:LPC55S69-EVK NTAG 5 link: NFC Forum-compliant I²C bridge for IoT on-demand | NXP  NTAG 5 boost: NFC Forum-compliant I²C bridge for tiny devices | NXP 
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This demonstration is based on RFIDDiscover full version and Pegoda EV710. You may refer to the following links for more details. RFIDDiscover | NXP  PEGODA Contactless Smart Card Reader | NXP  Before start the demonstration, please connect Pegoda with your PC via USB and place the MIFARE DESFire Light card on the reader. The history and log can be fetched from the attachment. Please refer to the video for more details.  
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This post contains step by step guide of how to use the NTAG I²C plus with LPC55S69. This is easy and straightforward to do, since the MCUXpresso SDK Builder tool has an option to add NTAG I²C plus example directly to SDK of LPC55S69. Hardware Needed: LPC55S69-EVK NTAG I²C plus explorer kit Follow the following simple steps to use NTAG I²C plus with LPC55S69: Download and install MCUXpresso IDE (if you don’t have it already). It can be download for free by clicking here: Next step is to use the MCUXpresso SDK Builder tool to build and download the SDK for LPC55S69. For this: Go to  the MCUXpresso SDK Builder website: https://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/en/select Select the LPC55S69 board and then click on ‘Build MCUXpresso SDK’ button: Click on ‘Add Software component’, then select the NTAG I2C component, click ‘Save changes’ and then download the SDK. Drag and drop the downloaded SDK to the installed SDK’s tab in the MCUXpresso IDE to install it. Click on the ‘Import SDK example(s)’ in the Quickstart Panel in the MCUXpresso IDE. Then select LPC55S69, ‘check the ntag_i2c_plus_example’ box and hit ‘Finish’. Connect the LPC55S69 and NTAG I²C plus boards together. Details of these connections can be found in the “readme.txt” file in the “doc” folder of the project: Finally click on debug in the Quickstart Panel to build the project, flash it to the MCU, and start debugging. This is how the output looks like in the Console tab of IDE: Bring any active nfc device (e.g. an NFC phone with NFC enabled) near the ntagi2c board. The program will detect it and consequently blink the LED as well as display a message on the console: Read the “readme.txt” file for more details regarding the project. Available Resources: BLE pairing with NFC on KW41 and  NTAG I²C plus  source code  www.nxp.com/downloads/en/snippets-boot-code-headers-monitors/SW4223.zip NTAG I²C plus  kit for Arduino pinout  www.nxp.com/demoboard/OM23221ARD
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This page contains information about the supported NXP MCU/MPU and NXP NFC product combinations which have ready to use packages. These can be used as a reference. The table below contains link to where you can find the projects as well.    MCU  ↓    NFC IC  →  NTAG I²C  plus NTAG 5 PN7150 CLRC663 plus family* PN5180 i.MX RT1050 i.MX RT1050 + NTAG I²C plus i.MX RT1050 + CLRC663 plus   Video: Using i.MX RT1050 with CLRC663 plus family and the NFC Reader Library | NXP  i.MX RT1060 i.MX RT1060 + NTAG I²C plus  i.MX RT1060 + PN7150 i.MX 8M Mini i.MX 8M Mini + PN7150 (Andriod) i.MX 8M Mini + PN7150 (linux-yocto) i.MX 7 Dual Sabre i.MX7 Dual Sabre + PN5180 LPC1769 LPC1769 + CLRC663 plus LPC1769 + PN5180 LPC55S69 LPC55S69 + NTAG I²C plus LPC55S69 + NTAG 5 LPC55S69 + PN7150 LPC55S69 + CLRC663 plus LPC55S69 + CLRC663 plus + SE050 (smart lock) LPC11u37h LPC11u37 + PN7150 LPC11u37h + CLRC663 plus LPC11u68 LPC11u68 + PN7150 LPC82X LPC82X + PN7150 LPC845 LPC845 + CLRC663 plus Kinetis K82F K82F + CLRC663 plus K82F + PN5180 Kinetis K64F K64F + PN7150 K64F + CLRC663 plus Kinetis K63 K63 + PN7150 Kinetis K24 K24 + PN7150 KW41Z KW41Z + NTAG I²C plus KW41Z + NTAG 5 KW41Z + PN7150 *CLRC663 plus family: CLRC663 plus, MFRC630 plus, MFRC631 plus, SLRC610 plus For more information on the NFC products, please visit  https://www.nxp.com/nfc
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This post contains step by step guide of how to use NTAG I²C plus with i.MX RT MCUs. The goal of this post is to enable developers to start developing their NFC Applications using NTAG I²C plus and i.MX RT MCUs quickly and easily. Attached with this post are two ready to use packages: ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ is to be used with MIMXRT1060-EVK and NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout. ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ is to be used with MIMXRT1050-EVK and NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout. Both packages contain the same example code but are configured for the two different boards. The example code demonstrates the following basic operations: Reading the EEPROM of NTAG I²C plus. Writing NTAG messages to NTAG I²C plus. Reading SRAM of NTAG I²C plus. Writing to SRAM of NTAG I²C plus. Using Field detect pin as interrupt to turn on an LED when an RF field is detected by the NTAG I²C board. The document has been structured as follows: NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout The NTAG I²C plus Arduino kit consist of two PCBs stacked together: The upper PCB is the antenna board with the connected tag The lower PCB is an interface adaptor board to the Arduino pinout This kit can be used to connect and evaluate the NTAG I²C plus  into many popular MCUs with Arduino compliant headers, for example:  Kinetis (e.g. KW41Z, i.MX (e.g. UDOO Neo, i.MX 6UL, i.MX 6 ULL, i.MX 7D), LPC MCUs (e.g. LPCXpresso MAX, V2 and V3 boards) and i.MX RT boards (e.g. i.MX RT1050, i.MX RT1060) The kit support package includes several software examples. The OM29110ARD is a generic interface board which offers support for connection to any PCB implementing Arduino connectors. It exposes: 3.3V and 5V power supply pins. I2C, SPI and UART host interfaces. Generic GPIOs (e.g. to be used for field detect, interrupts, reset pins or others) As such, it allows the NTAG I²C plus to be plugged into Arduino devices seamlessly. Hardware Requirements EVKB-IMXRT1050 board or EVKB-IMXRT1060 board. NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout (OM23221ARD) Cables: Micro USB cable 6 jumper wires Male to Female (Only required if using EVKB-IMXRT1050 board) Using NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout with EVKB-IMXRT1060 Hardware Connections The hardware connections are simple. Both the EVKB-IMXRT1060 board and OM23221ARD (NTAG I²C plus) board have Arduino interface. So simply connect both as shown in figure:  Running the Demo Follow the below mentioned steps to run the demo: Download the ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ package which you will find attached to this post.  Drag and drop the downloaded package to your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE, click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started click on the run icon to run the code:                                 Note:  If this is your first time using IMXRT1060EVK board, it is recommended to follow the getting started guide first ( i.MX RT1060 Evaluation Kit | NXP  ) To see the output, you need to have a terminal application installed (like Tera term or PuTTY). The output looks like this:                                                    Using NTAG I²C plus kit for Arduino pinout with EVKB-IMXRT1050 Hardware Connections In case of EVKB-IMXRT1050, the I2C pins on the Arduino interface’s J24 pin 9 and 10 are only connected to the i.MX RT slave I²C port, not to a master I²C port. So, we cannot just plug in the NTAG I²C plus kit, instead we need to connect two boards with the help of jumper wires. The connections required are show in figure below.                                Running the Demo Download the ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package which you will find attached to this post. Drag and drop the downloaded package to your MCUXpresso IDE workspace (If you don’t have MCUXpresso, it can be downloaded for free from here: https://www.nxp.com/support/developer-resources/software-development-tools/mcuxpresso-software-and-tools/mcuxpresso-integrated-development-environment-ide:MCUXpresso-IDE Now that the package has been imported to the MCUXpresso IDE, click on Debug icon from the Quickstart panel to begin a debug session. Once the debug session has started click on the run icon to run the code:                                Note:  If this is your first time using IMXRT1050EVK board, it is recommended to follow the getting started guide first ( i.MX RT1050 Evaluation Kit | NXP  ) To see the output, you need to have a terminal application installed (like Tera term or PuTTY). The output looks like this:                                            Porting the Package to any other i.MX RT Boards    If you want to use NTAG I²C plus with i.MX RT boards other than the i.MX RT1050 or the i.MX RT1060, then you’ve       to port the example package. This is fairly straightforward and the procedure is described below: Import the ‘hello world’ project from the SDK of the board to which you want to port the package. (SDKs for every board are freely available for download from the MCUXpresso SDK Builder website).We will modify this ‘hello world’ project adding code from attached packages, to make it work on the desired board.                                     Copy the following folders from the attached ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ or ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package to the ‘hello world’ project imported in step 1:                               Copy the two files to the ‘drivers’ folder of ‘hello world’ project: Delete the ‘hello_world.c’ file from the source folder: Now copy the following preprocessor micros from ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ or ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package to ‘hello world’ project:      Preprocessor settings can be found by right clicking Project-Properties>C++Build > Settings  Now we need to change the project configuration:        a.  Add the newly copied folders to source location; Right click on Project->Properties and add the following        folders:    b.  Include paths to the added libraries in the project. These can be copied from the from ‘evkbimxrt1060_ntagI2C’ or ‘evkbimxrt1050_ntagI2C’ package. Open project->properties and copy the following in the respective places as shown in the images:  Change pin configurations according to the board pins you are using:             a. For changing field detect pin, the code can be found in the source file:                   b. For I2C instance, the lines of code are in app_ntag->app_ntag.h:              c. These pins also need to be initialized which can be done through the pin initialization tool of MCUXpresso or code can be added to the ‘board.c’ file in ‘board’ folder. Once these changes are done, porting is complete. Build the project, it should build without any errors. Available resources BLE pairing with NFC on KW41 and  NTAG I²C plus  source code  www.nxp.com/downloads/en/snippets-boot-code-headers-monitors/SW4223.zip NTAG I²C plus  kit for Arduino pinout  www.nxp.com/demoboard/OM23221ARD    
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https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-340244 
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Hello NFC and Kinetis enthusiasts, NTAG I2C plus tag ICs offer both, a contact (I2C) and a contactless interface (NFC) to ease the development of IoT, home-automation and consumer applications. The target of this document and the example projects is to show how NTAG I2C plus can act as the bridge from a host NFC device, like a smartphone or PC, to an embedded board such as a Kinetis Freedom board. 2 main functionalities are demonstrated: embedded board control via NFC and firmware upgrades over NFC. Board control with NFC enabled device NTAG I2C plus provides an easy way of sending/receiving any kind of data between a product embedding an MCU to a host NFC device (e.g. smartphone). Some use cases include product configuration, control or data sensing. A major advantage is that we can have a customized application or graphic interface in the smartphone instead of expense of an LCD screen for the embedded board. Bootloader over NFC Firmware updates in the field are a very common practice for products based in an embedded system. The main advantages of a bootloader over NFC are the simplicity and the non intrusive nature, as it communicates using NFC antennas, i.e. without any wires or physical connections. DEMO PROJECT The next picture shows the setup and connections from the NTAG I2C Plus antenna board to the FRDM-K64F. Hardware - Kinetis Freedom board FRDM-K64F - NTAG I2C Plus Antenna board or flex antenna with the NTAG I2C plus IC. Software - Kinetis Software Development Kit (KSDK) v2.0 - Kinetis Design Studio (KDS) v3.2 - NTAG I2C Demo Android application. Available from Google Play. :smileyalert: Note: Please verify that your smartphone supports NFC. Otherwise the Android app can be installed but it cannot be used for interfacing with the NTAG I2C Plus IC. TESTING THE DEMO PROJECTS There are two KDS projects attached to this document: - NTAG_I2C_Plus_FRDMK64_Demo: Demonstrates the transfer of data between the phone and the MCU. - NTAG_I2C_Plus_FRDMK64_Bootloader: Provides a mean to update the firmware in the Kinetis MCU. The application must be prepared to be placed at an offset of 0x4000 in the MCU internal flash. To load any of these demos please open the corresponding project in KDS IDE, build the project and start a debugger session to program the K64. NTAG_I2C_Plus_FRDMK64_Bootloader 1- In FRDM-K64F, SW2 must be pressed during reset to enter bootloader mode. Hence the 2 usual ways are:+    A) If the board is powered, press and hold SW2 and then press Reset button.    B) When the board is not powered, press and hold SW2 and then plug the USB cable. 2- From the Android demo app go to the "Flash" option. Then click on "Select from Storage" to browse for the application binary file. :smileyinfo: Note: For this bootloader example, the application including the vector table must be relocated to an offset of 0x4000 in Flash. 3- Finally tap the phone to the NTAG I2C Plus antenna and hold it steady during the flashing progress. When the app shows "Flash Completed" the new application starts executing. NTAG_I2C_Plus_FRDMK64_Demo :smileyalert: NOTE: By default the demo project has the 0x4000 offset, so please build the project and then load the generated binary using the bootloader as described above. - Bring the NFC enabled phone near the NTAG I2C Antenna. - Verify transfer is already in progress, by checking the "Board Status". - Press the Orange/Blue/Green buttons in the Android app to change the color of the RGB LED. - Enable the checkbox for "Enable Temperature Sensor" to see the reading of the K64 internal temperature. I hope these demo projects are useful. Please feel free to share your comments or ask any questions. Regards! Jorge Gonzalez
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