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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

EmSA recently released some updates to FAIM support on LPC84x devices in their popular Flash Magic tool. If you are using this unique feature of the LPC84x device series be sure to update to version 12.65 or later to get access to command line support and the latest fixes for some previous bogus errors/warnings that were appearing.

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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

LPC845 Breakout Board now has an SDK package available! We are working on updating our getting started information to show how to use this rather than starting from the LPC845 chip SDK. The board is called LPC845BREAKOUT in the SDK builder.

pastedImage_2.png

We used the board to teach a class on how to create a custom SDK for your own board. The class got several thumbs up at our recent Seattle Tech Day and Santa Clara Connects events. The materials are here:

https://community.nxp.com/docs/DOC-343310

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BlackNight
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

I really love tiny and bread board friendly boards, especially if they are very affordable and can be use with Eclipse based tools. So I was excited to see the NXP LPC845-BRK board to be available at Mouser, so I ended up ordering multiple boards right away. Why multiple? Because they only cost CHF 5.95 (around $6)!

NXP LPC845-BRK Board

NXP LPC845-BRK Board

The boards arrived yesterday, so it is a perfect timing to have them (and more of it) integrated into the next semester university course material. So you will probably see a few more tutorials for this board.

lpc845-brk boards

Unboxing

The kit comes in a solid card box with:

  • the LPC845-BRK board
  • two 10pin headers
  • Micro USB cable
  • a smalls screwdriver
  • two 2pin jumpers and headers
  • getting started reference card
lpc845-brk kit content

The board works out of the box and does not need any soldering, and the headers are provided in case I want to customize the board. I like the fact that the headers are supplied, plus I’m free what I want to solder to the board. Plus I can use different headers if I want to. I was puzzled by the screwdriver (what for?) until I realized that there is small potentiometer on the board :-).

LPC845-BRK Board

The main MCU on the board is the LPC845 in QFN48 package ( LPC845M301JBD4), an ARM Cortex-M0+, 30 MHz, 64 KB FLASH and 16 KB SRAM):

LPC84x Block Diagram

The board has a ‘break-apart’ touch area: if I don’t need it, I can make the board smaller. it includes a potentiometer, an RGB LED, three push buttons (Reset, user and ISP). Plus most important: the LPC11U35 acting as a debug probe:

LPC845-BRK Board Components

I can use the LPC845 with an external debug probe: for this I have to solder a jumper plus the 2×5 header. All the three buttons can be used as user buttons, so technically there are three of them. There is as well a jumper for an ammeter to measure the current used.

Software and Tools

There is no dedicated MCUXpresso SDK for that board (yet?), so I have downloaded the one for the device from http://mcuxpresso.nxp.com/:

SDK for LPC845

With drag&drop I added it to the NXP MCUXpresso IDE 10.3.0:

Installed SDK for LPC845

On the LPC845-BRK web site there is a zip file with examples which I have imported into the MCUXpresso IDE:

examples

When plugged in, the board enumerates with a virtual COM port which is a gateway to the LPC845 UART:

Virtual COM Port

I was able to debug the board out of the box, the board is recognized as CMSIS-DAP debug probe:

linkserver

And voilà: I’m debugging it 

Debugging with MCUXpresso IDE

Summary

I really like that board. It is of good quality with a lot of value. It has a on-board debugger and even the possibility to use it directly with a J-Link or P&E Multilink if I wish so. The board is small, can be hooked on a bread board and can be made even smaller with removing the touch pad. The Cortex-M0+ is not the fastest and biggest MCU on the planet, but provides enough processing power for many smaller applications. I plan to follow-up with more tutorials in the next days and weeks. Until then, see the tutorials listed in the Links section below.

List of articles about the LPC845-BRK board:

Happy BRKing  :-)

Links

- - -

Originally published on January 31, 2019 by Erich Styger

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BlackNight
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

The LPC845-BRK is a great tiny sub-$6 breakout board featuring the LPC845M301JBD4 MCU:

  • ARM Cortex-M0+
  • 30 MHz, 64 KByte FLASH, 16 KByte SRAM
  • On-board CMSIS-DAP debug interface, works out-of-the-box with NXP MCUXpresso IDE or other 3rd party IDEs
  • 3 push buttons (user, RESET, ISP)
  • RGB LED
  • Potentiometer

NXP LPC845-BRK Board

Reference Material

Community Projects and Articles

Below you can find a lists of community post, blog and articles around this great board:

Post a comment if you have found another article or project to be added to this list!

Enjoy!

Erich

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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

We've been working on making the flagship member of the LPC800 series more accessible to more users than ever before, and are delighted to announce the LPC845 Breakout Board is now available from our distribution partners and also direct from nxp.com! Setting a new price point for a fully featured, debug enabled platform, this board includes CMSIS-DAP compatible debug and a VCOM port in a very compact yet flexible form factor. Of course it can be used with MCUXpresso IDE, Keil, IAR and other popular tools.

MCUXpresso SDK based examples are available now, and you will have seen some examples of interfacing to MEMS sensors, LDRs, SPI displays and a UART GPS module already on this site, all using commonly available from Adafruit and distributors.

Keen LPC user Kevin Townsend has been working on some other, more complex projects that he's posted on his github and on hackster.io ... an I2C co-processor for Raspberry Pi and today a fun smart Jenga block. He tells me he has another project one the way next week, so keep a look out for that!

We hope you enjoy this new board and, as always, we love to hear what you think and what you create!

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DishaPatil
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

The new LPC845 breakout board has 3 onboard LEDs- Red, Green, and Blue. The brightness of these LEDs can be controlled using a PWM signal by changing the duty cycle values for each of them. As this board has an SDK support, I have used the SDK drivers to implement this application. 

pastedImage_1.png

The SCTimer0 generates the PWM pulse at pins which are assigned as the SCT output pins. I have assigned the PWM output to the Green LED (PIO1_0) in my source code. You can assign the PWM output to be on any other LED by using the inbuilt configuration tool which is explained later. 

The source code below shows how to set the duty cycle percentage to increase or decrease the brightness of the assigned LED (here I have set it to 60%) 

pwmParam.level = kSCTIMER_HighTrue;
pwmParam.dutyCyclePercent = 60;

Writing the source code for this application was easy as the LPC845 Breakout board has an SDK package support. I used the SCT (Sctimer) SDK driver API in the software. The MCUXpresso SDK Builder has open source drivers, middleware, and reference example applications for software development. Customize and download the SDK specific to the processor and then import the zip file to the project in MCUXpresso IDE.
                                                                                                                                                                                               
The LPC845 Breakout board also features function-configurable I/O ports through a switch matrix (SWM). This makes it easier to configure pin routing and other pin electrical features. The configuration tool which is integrated into the IDE is useful for making changes in the switch matrix. The source code is auto-generated when the pin configuration or peripherals are changed.
/* SCT_OUT2 connect to P1_0 */
SWM_SetMovablePinSelect(SWM0, kSWM_SCT_OUT2, kSWM_PortPin_P1_0);
 
The source code for this application and board info for the LPC845 Breakout board can be found here.

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DishaPatil
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

I have built an application to interface an accelerometer with the new LPC845 Breakout board using the I2C SDK driver.
The accelerometer acts as an I2C slave device to the LPC845 master device. Colors on the on-board RGB LED change according to the accelerometer position.
 
The accelerometer is a slave device in this application with slave address: 0x1D. The position of the board is determined by the x,y,z-axis values obtained from this slave device. The change in these x,y,z values detects the movement of the LPC845 Breakout board. I have assigned various patterns to the RGB LEDs for each movement along the y-axis. 
pastedImage_5.png

Refer to the table for the hardware Connections for this application:
The NXP MMA8652 3-axis accelerometer on the breakout board can be connected using I2C protocol. SCL, SDA lines and can be powered via VDD, VDDIO and GND pins.

Connect pins of I2C master and slave as below:
MasterSlave
Pin NameBoard LocationPin NameBoard Location
SCL CN1-23SCL J2-3
SDACN1-22SDAJ2-4
VCCCN1-40VDD/VDDIOJ1-3/4
GND CN1-20GND J1-5

pastedImage_1.png
The LPC845 Breakout board has an SDK package support. I used the I2C SDK driver API in the software for interfacing the hardware components. The MCUXpresso SDK Builder has open source drivers, middleware, and reference example applications for software development. Customize and download the SDK specific to the processor and then import the zip file to the project in MCUXpresso IDE.
                                                                                                                                                                                               
The LPC845 Breakout board also features function-configurable I/O ports through a switch matrix (SWM). This makes it easier to configure pin routing and other pin electrical features. The configuration tool which is integrated into the IDE is useful for making changes in the switch matrix. The source code is auto-generated when the pin configuration or peripherals are changed.
/* I2C0_SDA connect to P0_11 */
SWM_SetFixedPinSelect(SWM0, kSWM_I2C0_SDA, true);

/* I2C0_SCL connect to P0_10 */
SWM_SetFixedPinSelect(SWM0, kSWM_I2C0_SCL, true);
 
The source code for this application and board info for the LPC845 Breakout board can be found here.

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DishaPatil
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

Using SDK drivers for LPC845 Breakout Board, this project measures the ambient light intensity by using LDR (Light Dependent Resistor). The voltage values from LDR are read through an ADC. The new LPC845 Breakout board has an SDK support which makes it a lot easier to interface an LDR for measuring light intensity compared to the conventional coding style. I have used the MCUXpresso IDE for modifying the pins and clock configuration settings.
The project requires a resistor and LDR (Light Dependent Resistor)/Photoresistor in a resistor divider circuit as shown below:
ldr-circuit.jpg

The value of R1 here is 4.4Kohm. 

The output of this resistor divider circuit is connected to the assigned ADC channel. In this application, I have assigned it to the ADC0_8 channel which is the PIO0_18 (pin 3) and configured it accordingly in the software.
Components used: LPC845 Breakout Board, Light Dependent Resistor(LDR)/Photoresistor, 2.2Kohm resistor (Quantity:2)
LPC845 Breakout Board connections to the LDR are as shown:
LPC845LDR
Pin NameBoard LocationPin Name
ADC_8PIO0_18 (CN1-3)resistor divider o/p
VCCCN1-40LDR
GNDCN1-204.4k resistor
image.png
For this application, I have used ADC0_8 as the ADC channel which converts the LDR output analog voltage values to digital values. The values printed on the console window reflect the change in the light intensity.
(For testing purposes, the light intensity can be changed by covering the LDR or using a cellphone flash)
The LPC845 Breakout board has an SDK package support. I used the ADC SDK driver API in the software for interfacing the hardware components. The MCUXpresso SDK Builder has open source drivers, middleware, and reference example applications for software development. Customize and download the SDK specific to the processor and then import the zip file to the project in MCUXpresso IDE.
                                                                                                                                                                            
The LPC845 Breakout board also features function-configurable I/O ports through a switch matrix (SWM). This makes it easier to configure pin routing and other pin electrical features. The configuration tool which is integrated into the IDE is useful for making changes in the switch matrix. The source code is auto-generated when the pin configuration or peripherals are changed.
 
/* ADC_CHN8 connect to P0_18 */
SWM_SetFixedPinSelect(SWM0, kSWM_ADC_CHN8, true);
The source code for this application and board info for the LPC845 Breakout board can be found here.
int main(void)
{
/* Initialize board hardware. */
BOARD_InitPins();
BOARD_BootClockRUN();
BOARD_InitDebugConsole();
/* Configure the converter and work mode. */
ADC_Configuration();
while(1)
{
/* Trigger the sequence's conversion by software */
ADC_DoSoftwareTriggerConvSeqA(DEMO_ADC_BASE);
/* Wait for the converter to be done. */
while (!ADC_GetChannelConversionResult(DEMO_ADC_BASE, DEMO_ADC_SAMPLE_CHANNEL_NUMBER, &adcResultInfoStruct))
{
}
/* Display the conversion result */
PRINTF("adcResult = %d\r\n", adcResultInfoStruct.result);
}
}
nxp mcu tools lpcbreakout sdk builder mcuxpresso 10.2‌

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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

The LPC800-DIP board is now being sold by Coridium for just $10:

http://www.coridium.us/coridium/shop/boards/bd07-special

 snipcart-thumb-image

They have their own version of gcc and BASIC running on it too, available for just a few $$

http://www.coridium.us/coridium/shop/software/s07-basic-lpc824

Enjoy! 

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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

You may be interested to know that we recently released a new set of debug firmware and Windows 7 drivers for our boards that feature the LPC11U3x MCU as a debug probe (so all the "MAX" boards). The new firmware can be found under the Software & Tools tab of the board page you are using  http://www.nxp.com/demoboard/omxxxxx (where xxxxx is the board part number, such as om13071, om13097, etc.

The intention is for this firmware to be used instead of the Mbed-based firmware and driver that has been used up until now, if you are not going to use Mbed (you can continue to use the Mbed version if you so wish however). Some reasons to consider the new firmware & driver:

  • The CMSIS-DAP implementation is newer, so a little more robust and faster
  • The VCOM / serial port driver supports autobaud, with speeds up to 115200
  • The VCOM driver has a cleaner installation (mbed serial port driver needs board to be plugged in to install, which is a little unusual)
  • The firmware auto-detects if a target serial port connection is present and enumerates a driver if they are.
  • The new firmware gives a unique ID per board, allowing multiple board connections at once.

Downloading the package will give you a driver for Windows 7 & 8 (not needed for Windows 10, MacOS or Linux), plus the debug probe firmware image. Follow the firmware update instructions for your board to update - its a simple delete then drag and drop operation.

Enjoy!

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peter_furtner
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

LPCXpert V3.4 is the latest release of a freeware expert tool for the CORTEX-M based LPC families of microcontrollers. This tool simplifies the selection of a MCU device, speeds up the creation of application code and initialization code and supports generation of an application specific schematic Symbol. This version supports more than 410 different CORTEX-M based micro controllers from NXP.

 

LPCXpert supports all phases of a development. During the MCU selection phase LPCxperts supports selection of a target MCU by providing selection features in the "MCU Select" tab. During the software implementation phase LPCXpert provides a graphical user-interface to configure the pinout (Pin-MUX) and the peripheral interfaces of the target device. LPCXpert then also generates projects providing a framework of reference applications. These applications configure the Clock Generation Unit (CGU) and the on-chip peripheral interfaces of the device to test and demonstrate the setup.

 

New and enhanced features include support for LPCopen software package from NXP. Features also include generation of a Schematic Symbol for the ALTIUM Designer and the CADSOFT EAGLE V6.2 and generation of projects for the NXP LPCXpresso and MCUxpresso IDE, IAR Embedded Workbench (EWARM), Keil µVision and GNU C-Compilers, as well as links to Internet Sites for additional information.

Using LPCXpert it is possible to set the pins of each peripheral (i.e. for SPI, CAN., I2C, EMC, ETH, ...) and to configure the features of each pin (Pull-Up, Pull-Down, ...). In addition LPCxpert V3.4 also supports configuration of pre-built demo code for the LPC8xx and LPC54xxx Families of MCUs.

 

Based on the configuration LPCXpert may generate a C-Code Project or a Schematic Symbol. In addition LPCxpert saves up to 8 different pin-mux configurations and restore from up to 10 different configurations. Additional Information and the download is available from the following Web-Site:

--> http://www.lpcxpert.com

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justinbmortimer
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

Back in Austin TX after a fun trip to Nürnberg, Germany.

I am humbled and energized after spending a week with 30,000+ engineers at this year’s Embedded World!

IMG_1192.JPG

Amazing.  That’s the only way to describe the passion and enormity of our LPC FANS across Europe.  LPC is deep-rooted in the hearts of many and I am lucky to be a part of this inspired, tightknit community.    Embedded World has a strong place in the heart of LPC. 

 

My personal highlights from the event .... LPC FANS, What's Popular, MCUXpresso & Geoff.

  • LPC FANS.

My favorite experience of the event was standing proudly at the LPC pedestal shaking hands with 1000s of LPC FANS.  I enjoyed connecting with each of you, hearing about your success, ideas and future needs.  Everything begins with great people … and we will continue to learn and find inspiration from you.  Thank you for your guidance as we build our next generation of differentiated microcontrollers!

IMG_1221a.JPG

  • What's Popular?  LPC800 & LPC54000 demos & give-aways!

The 8-bit MCU market is moving to the 32-bit world and we are excited to show off the cool features of the LPC800 series, but EW was really more focused on the LPC54600 family.  High performance and integration for power-sensitive applications.  We showed off a variety of demos and partner solutions at the pedestal.  Stunning, low-power, cost effective GUIs made easy with Embedded Wizard and TouchGFX.

Longtime NXP partner, Embedded Systems Academy showcased the dramatic improvements the LPC5461x family of CAN-FD controllers can make in various industrial applications.

IMG_1208.JPG

With our partners, we gave away tons of LPC boards, from our power-optimized, full speed USB enabled LPC54114 board, to our newest LPCXpresso54608 platform.  And over 200 engineers & students left on the final day with an LPC800 DIP boarda very fun platform to experience what everyone is talking about ... LPC800!  Much more to come this year, stay tuned!

  • MCUXpresso.

NXP spent a year working on a unified development experience and Embedded World was the near final step in our MCUXpresso roll-out.  Erich Styger & Andy Beeson did an unbelievable job showing our new tools, read more at Erich's blog.

  • Geoff Lees

pastedImage_10.png

#1, LPCFANS and I both loved seeing Geoff engaged and interacting with numerous customers, fans and partners.  Many of you commented how "cool" it was to see Geoff approachable and engaged throughout the event. Year after year, his commitment to the industry and his visible presence at Embedded World is inspiring.  I am not sure where he finds his energy!

#2, Geoff stole the show (like only Geoff can do). Check out Junko Yoshida's article in EETimes, where Geoff   "unveiled a sweeping plan to broadly migrate design and production of general-purpose processors and microcontrollers from CMOS nodes to the FD-SOI" ... all-in on 28 FD-SOI.  Get ready for our next generation of breakthrough processors and microcontrollers.

Thank you to the NXP team and valued partners for your hard work making this event a huge success!  

IMG_1195.JPG

IMG_1204.JPG

And to our LPC FANS, thank you for continuing to believe ... until next time! 

  Justin

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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

We gave out 200 of our LPC800 DIP breakout board (with an LPC824 installed) at Embedded World last week ... they were snapped up pretty fast! For those lucky folks who grabbed one, here is the schematic. Pretty simple stuff, probably actually easier to read on the packaging!

800dip-pic.png

(Photo courtesy of Erich Styger https://mcuoneclipse.com/2017/03/19/embedded-world-nurnberg-2017-impressions-mcuxpresso-hexiwear-nta...)

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jessegarcia-b45
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

Links to material being referenced:

 

LPCXpresso IDE Download

 

Setup Guide

 

This guide will be the first of many entries where I will show you how to get started with LPC. Today this entry will focus on setting up the IDE and highlighting which products are supported by LPCXpresso IDE.

  1. Visit the link at the top of the post that will direct you to the LPCXpresso IDE page. As of this time, the current version is v8.8.2
  2. Click the gray download link1.pngNote: You will need an account in order to download the IDE. Login or create an account
  3. Once signed in you will be presented with the following window2.pngThis guide assumes you will install on Windows. The steps will be more or less the same regardless of which operating system is utilized for the installation. We will register the software in a later step.
  4. Once you've selected your operating system you will be presented with the following options

    3.pngIt is always recommended that you download the most recent version of the IDE but links are provided for previous editions, if necessary.  Clicking on the link automatically starts the installer. Each installer serves as a standalone package. If you are upgrading to the newest version, keep in mind that the old version remains on the computer. You may opt to manually uninstall old versions.
  5. Once you launch the installer and agree to the licensing terms, you will be prompted for an installation directory. Use the default directory.4.png

    Note: C:\nxp contains all LPCXpresso installations. You can open previous versions here if needed.

  6. Once the software installation finishes you will be prompted to install various drivers. You can select "Always trust software from 'NXP Semiconductors USA. Inc.'" to not have to individually approve each driver's installation.

    5.jpg

  7. You will be presented with the following window once the installation process has completed. You are free to review the version documentation and the IDE User Guide if you wish.

    6.jpg
  8. Once you launch LPCXpresso for the first time, you will be presented with the following window letting you know that you do not have an active license for the IDE. This limits you to debugging code up to 8k in size.7.jpg
  9. In order to increase this limit we need to request a free license by clicking on help in the task bar. Then scrolling down to "Activate" and selecting "Create serial number and register (Free Edition)"8.jpg
  10. A new window will come up with your serial number as shown below. Select "Open in external browser" to open up a browser window to generate the activation key.10.png
  11. Once the new browser window loads you will be presented with your activation key listed below the serial number. Highlight and copy this key.11.png
  12. We are going to follow a similar process to what we used to request the activation key but instead we will select "Activate (Free Edition)"12.jpg
  13. Paste the activation key into the new window that pops up12.png
  14. Once you press OK you will receive confirmation that your copy of LPCXpresso has been licensed. This allows you you to use all of the features of the IDE as well as raising your debug limit to 256k.
  15. You will be prompted to restart LPCXpresso and when it relaunches the welcome page will show that your copy is fully activated.

    13.jpgNote: Once you have an activated key, this key will also be utilized by MCUXpresso in the future. 

This tutorial demonstrated how to set up the free edition of LPCXpresso, however, activating the Pro edition is very similar.

As of this writing LPCXpresso IDE v8.8.2 can be used to develop on the following platforms:

  • LPC81x/LPC82x/LPC83x
  • LPC11xx
  • LPC11Uxx
  • LPC11Exx
  • LPC12xx
  • LPC13xx
  • LPC15xx
  • LPC17xx
  • LPC18xx
  • LPC2xxx
  • LPC3xxx
  • LPC40xx
  • LPC43xx
  • LPC5410x/LPC5411x

Next week, I will demonstrate how to install and setup IAR and KEIL for LPC. In the coming weeks, once I have shown you how to configure the software environments I will post getting started guides with different LPCXpresso development boards. Stay Tuned!

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jessegarcia-b45
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

In case you missed it, we extended our low cost LPC800 series, back in September with the addition of the LPC83x family. The LPC83x family introduces new functionality to our streamlined LPC800 series, which includes LPC81x and now LPC83x.  If more functionality is needed, our extremely popular superset LPC82x family is likely the one you need.

 

The LPC800 series is great 8- and 16-bit alternative for use in various systems, such as end node connectivity, gesture sensing for HMI, basic motor control, power line communication, battery power management … applications are endless from IoT smart home to building control, industrial automation, children’s toys, and more.

LPC83xBlockDiagram.png

The LPC83x family includes option for 32 kB flash, with the addition of 18 ch DMA and up to 12 channel, 12-bit ADC.  Rich capability bundled with a low price has allowed LPC800 series to become the most actively quoted and fastest growing LPC family to date with millions of units shipping in 2016.

 

The LPC832, available in TSSOP20 with 16kB of flash, and LPC834 available in HVQFN33 with 32 kB of flash, is just the start of the LPC800 relaunch.  Just wait until 2017 when many new product families are launched to market!

OM13071_PC824v2_LR_Main.jpg

If the LPC83x fits your requirements for your next design, the recommended board to purchase is the LPC824-MAX (OM13071) and using the free LPCXpresso IDE, you can use code bundles for the LPC800 series to speed up your design.

For more information on the LPC83x family please visit the links below

LPC800 Series Summary

LPC832 Product Page

LPC834 Product Page

LPC824-MAX Development Board

LPCXpresso IDE Summary

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peter_furtner
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

LPCXpert V3.3 is the latest release of a freeware expert tool for the NXP CORTEX-M based LPC families of microcontrollers. This tool simplifies the selection of a MCU device, speeds up the creation of application code and initialization code and it supports generation of an application specific schematic symbol.

This version supports about 400 different CORTEX-M based micro controllers from NXP.

LPCxpert supports all phases of a development. During the MCU selection phase LPCxperts supports selection of a target MCU by providing selection features in the "MCU Select" tab. During the software implementation phase LPCxpert provides a graphical user-interface to configure the pinout (Pin-MUX) and the peripheral interfaces of the target device. LPCxpert also generates a framework of executable code that configures the Clock Generation Unit (CGU) and the peripheral interfaces of the device.

New and enhanced features include support for LPCopen software package from NXP. Features also include generation of a Schematic Symbol for the ALTIUM Designer and the CADSOFT EAGLE V6.2 and generation of projects for IAR Embedded Workbench (EWARM), Keil µVision and GNU C-Compilers, as well as links to Internet Sites for additional information.

Using LPCXpert it is possible to set the pins of each peripheral (i.e. for SPI, CAN., I2C, EMC, ETH, ...) and to configure the features of each pin (Pull-Up, Pull-Down, ...). In addition LPCxpert V3.2 also supports configuration of pre-built demo code for the LPC8xx and LPC54xxx Families of MCUs.

Based on the configuration LPCXpert may generate a C-Code Project or a Schematic Symbol. In addition LPCxpert saves up to 8 different pin-mux configurations and restore from up to 10 different configurations.

Additional Information and the download is available from the following Web-Site:

--> www.lpcxpert.com

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brendonslade
NXP Employee
NXP Employee

Here in the LPC team we are really excited re-energizing the LPC800 family and are working hard to help customers who want to make the transition from 8 and 16-bit MCUs to the Cortex M0/M0+. To this end we've created code bundles which consist of software examples to teach users how to program the peripherals at the basic level. The examples provide register level peripheral access, and direct correspondence to the memory map in the User Manual. Examples are concise and accurate explanations are provided within the readmes and comments in source files. LPC81x and LPC82x example code bundles are available now, ready for use with LPCXpresso, Keil and IAR, and easily portable to any development toolchain. I've posted some direct links below, but remember you can find these by looking under the Software & Tools tab from the product page of the LPC8xx you are using. Enjoy!

LPC81x

http://www.nxp.com/files/microcontrollers/software/LPCWare/LPC812_Example_Code_Bundle_Keil_IAR_r1.0....

http://www.nxp.com/files/microcontrollers/software/LPCWare/LPC812_Example_Code_Bundle_LPCXpresso_r1....

http://w.nxp.com/files/microcontrollers/software/LPCWare/LPC812_Example_Code_Bundle_LPCXpresso_8.1.4...

  

LPC82x

http://cache.nxp.com/files/microcontrollers/software/LPCWare/LPC824_Example_Code_Bundle_IAR_r1.0.zip
http://cache.nxp.com/files/microcontrollers/software/LPCWare/LPC824_Example_Code_Bundle_Keil_r1.0.zi...
http://cache.nxp.com/files/microcontrollers/software/LPCWare/LPC824_Example_Code_Bundle_LPCXpresso_r...

 

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