Regarding MC,PC,S9 conventions.(eg MCHCS908AW60)

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Regarding MC,PC,S9 conventions.(eg MCHCS908AW60)

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denny_george
Contributor I
Hello,
 
Can Any one explain me the significance of MC,PC,S conventions.(eg MCHCS908AW60/PCHCS908AW60/S9HCS908AW60). I understand they stand for fully qualified,Product Engineering,Auto Qualified respectively.But what does that mean.
 
If I were to buy MCUs in bulk will I be given only MCxxxxxxx?  
 
Thanks in Advance!
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Ake
Contributor II
Hi,
When Freescale has made a new MCU, but it has not been tested yet, it is called PCxxx.
The PC parts are not for sale, and are given away to important customers, who must have them to shorten the developement time.
 
The MC prefix means that this is a fully-qualified part. There are datasheets and realibility figures available. They are fully qualified.
 
In the old days, the first Motorola MCU was the MC6800. It was furhter developed into the MC6801, -2, -5.
Some of the MC680x had an EPROM on board. They were called the MC687xxx devices.
After some additional years, the processing was changed, and the new parts were called the MC68HCxx devices. A typical EPROM part was the MC68HC705C8.
 
Later a brand new family was launched. It was called the HC908 family, where the "9" said that a Flash EPROM was used and the family was the "08".
A typical part was the MC68HC908JL3.
 
Recently a new "08" family was launced. But as the ICs were getting smaller and smaller, the name had to be changed to MC9Sxxx, so it would fit on the package. The "9" is a Flash EPROM part, and the "S" declares the family name. 
 
There are some MCUs that are available in special versions, eg the MC68HRC908JL3, which runs with a simple R-C oscillator.
 
The devices that you mention, I have not heard of. The closest is the MC9S08AW60 or the PC9S08AW60.
If you bought the 9S08AW60, you would get the MC type.
If you got the PC  type, you should get a few pieces, and you should get them free.
 
Regards,
Ake
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denny_george
Contributor I
Hi Ake,
 
Howz life in Spain!!!
 
Ok!!! My devices were
MC9S08DZ60MLF
PC9S08DZ60F0MLF
S9S08DZ60F1MLF
And not AW family..To be more familiar I converted DZ to AW :smileysurprised:
 
 
I'm satisfied with the answers for MC and PC.But what about S9S08DZ60F1MLF




Message Edited by Geo*** on 2008-10-14 10:53 AM
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denny_george
Contributor I
Hello All,
 
S=Auto Qualified  ???? What does that mean ..Anything to do with Automotive field ???
 
For Heaven's sake somebody reply :smileysad:
 
 
What are Freescalers here doing :smileymad:
 
S9S08DZ60==>
9==>Flash Type
S08==>Core
DZ==>Family
60==>Approx Flash size in kB.


Message Edited by Geo*** on 2008-10-14 02:16 PM
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J2MEJediMaster
Specialist I
It means the part has been qualified for automotive applications.

---Tom
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denny_george
Contributor I
Hi Tom,
 
Thanks a lot !
 
 
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Lundin
Senior Contributor IV
Will this be standard part number for all Freescale micros or just for the S08 family? Where is the documentation about this?

Great idea to choose S9 as prefix so we won't at all confuse it with neither S908 nor Motorola s-records...

I guess it will follow the tradition of logcial and intuitive part numbers. Look at the different part numbers the S12 went through for example:

- First there was 68HC12.
- Then a new device was made, called "Star12".
- Star12 was renamed to MC9S12*****.
- Some silicon masks were named MCS12*****B.
- When the bugs were fixed, new silicon masks got the name MC9S12***** back. Or sometimes it was called "C" just to confuse, but this isn't an official part number.
- New letter "E" was appended with RoHS.
- New letters were appended with tape & reel. This part number was completely undocumented anywhere, it just popped up out of the blue without any info about it. As far as I know, it is still undocumented.

You can be **bleep** sure the Freescale retailers and their app engineers are utterly clueless as soon as you ask them about part numbers and silicon masks. Every single one of them I have met will always "get back to me" as soon as I ask about it. Or alternatively smile, nod and give me the wrong chip. I have received 68HC12 when I wanted S12. I have received S12DG128B when I explicitly asked for one without "B".

I really don't blame the retailers either, because Freescale keeps spitting out hundreds of new MCUs each year and the structure of the part numbers is constantly changing...
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Ake
Contributor II
Hi,
I have not heard about the S9S08 before.
But I guess that Tom is right. It must be some special qualification, made for one ctm I'd suppose.
 
Regards,
Ake
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denny_george
Contributor I
Hi Ake,
 
I think its not a custom made.
Its from datasheet MC9S08DZ60 Series Data Sheet, Rev. 4, Page 405 ,MC9S08DZ128 Series Data Sheet, Rev. 1 page 447.
 
 
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Ake
Contributor II
Hi,
Now I see. MC is Fully Qaulified and S is Auto Qualified (as you earlier said).
So you want to know what the Auto Qualified stands for.
OK, I will try to find it out.
Or maybe Tom can tell us?
Regards,
Ake
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J2MEJediMaster
Specialist I
I am assuming--dangerously, it now appears--that auto qualified means for automotive applications. Which means the thing would be ruggedized, capable of operating under extreme conditions of temperature and humidity. In other words, not a benign operating environment like that found in consumer electronics or electronic gear that runs in an office or even on a factory floor.

Rather than start a misconception that would makes things worse, Ake, could you please find out what these things mean? I'm going to shut up before I possibly confuse things more.

---Tom
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Ake
Contributor II
Hi,
OK, I have got a paper describing the differences between the Auto and the Consumer/Industrial quality procedures.
 
In general, FSL offers two types of qual tiers for MCUs – Auto qualification and C&I qualification.
• Products that follow the Auto or C&I qual tier vary by both the qualification process and the production test flow that they receive.
• Auto qualified parts follow a much more demanding qualification process – AEC (Automotive Electronics Council) Q100 Grade 1 qual flow.  The AEC Q100 qual flow is an Auto standard qualification process that all of the major OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers require for nearly all of their applications.
• The results of an AEC Q100 qualification are documented in a product’s PPAP (Production Part Approval Process). 
• PPAPs only exist for Auto qualified products.
 
So I think that when exchaning the common MC with an S, the part has to go thru AEG testing.
 
Regards,
Ake
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denny_george
Contributor I
Hello All,
 
Auto Qualified (S) and Fully Qualified(MC).
 
Whats the difference in MCU ??? Is it the peripheral quality??(All the periperals are same!!!)  ? Silicon used? Protection against EMI/EMC extra in S?
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Lundin
Senior Contributor IV
Here is a link to Freescale's official site:

http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=S08D&nodeId=016246844929941644&tab=Bu...

Such a bright idea to change the part number... not even Freescale themselves know about it. I wonder what part the retailer will give me when I ask for S9... probably a STR9 from ST Microelectronics.
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